Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Life Sciences Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 11 of 11

Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Ponderosa Pine Revisited, J. Robert Haller, Nancy J. Vivrette Mar 2011

Ponderosa Pine Revisited, J. Robert Haller, Nancy J. Vivrette

Aliso: A Journal of Systematic and Floristic Botany

We here recognize a new variety, Pinus ponderosa var. pacifica, in the Pacific portion of the species' distribution and present a new combination for Washoe pine as a variety, Pinus ponderosa var. washoensis. In this treatment, we reject the neotype of Pinus ponderosa selected by Lauria and designate instead the branch collected by David Douglas with mistletoe (Arceuthobium campylopodum) as lectotype for Pinus ponderosa. Table 1 compares the distinguishing characters of the North Plateau (typical) variety, the Pacific variety, and the Washoe variety of Pinus ponderosa with a closely related species, Pinus jeffreyi. Figure 1 illustrates the cones of the ...


Two New Combinations In Western North American Asteraceae, David J. Keil May 2010

Two New Combinations In Western North American Asteraceae, David J. Keil

Aliso: A Journal of Systematic and Floristic Botany

Two new combinations that will be used in the second edition of The Jepson Manual are proposed for western North American Asteraceae: Helianthus petiolaris subsp. canescens and Cirsium scariosum var. loncholepis.


Nomenclatural Changes For Some Grasses In California And The Muhlenbergia Clade (Poaceae), J. Travis Columbus, James P. Smith Jr. May 2010

Nomenclatural Changes For Some Grasses In California And The Muhlenbergia Clade (Poaceae), J. Travis Columbus, James P. Smith Jr.

Aliso: A Journal of Systematic and Floristic Botany

New combinations and names are here validated for ten grass (Poaceae) taxa in California for the forthcoming revision of The Jepson Manual. In addition, guided by recent molecular phylogenetic studies, ten non-California grass species are here transferred to Muhlenbergia (Chloridoideae: Cynodonteae) to achieve monophyly of the genus. Lolium, long known to be phylogenetically nested within Festuca, is here subsumed into Festuca, and the circumscription of Stipa is expanded to include all Stipeae (native and non-native) in California. In Stipeae, most currently recognized genera are not monophyletic. Attaining monophyly while bearing in mind identification for persons not expert in Stipeae were ...


A Brief Nomenclatural Review Of Genera And Tribes In Theaceae, Linda M. Prince Jul 2007

A Brief Nomenclatural Review Of Genera And Tribes In Theaceae, Linda M. Prince

Aliso: A Journal of Systematic and Floristic Botany

The angiosperm family Theaceae has been investigated extensively with a rich publication record of anatomical, cytological, paleontological, and palynological data analyses and interpretation. Recent developmental and molecular data sets and the application of cladistic analytical methods support dramatic changes in circumscription at the familial, tribal, and generic levels. Growing interest in the family outside the taxonomic and systematic fields warrants a brief review of the recent nomenclatural history (mainly 20th century), some of the classification systems currently in use, and an explanation of which data support various classification schemes. An abridged bibliography with critical nomenclatural references is provided.


A Phylogenetic Classification Of Polemoniaceae, J. Mark Porter, Leigh A. Johnson Jan 2000

A Phylogenetic Classification Of Polemoniaceae, J. Mark Porter, Leigh A. Johnson

Aliso: A Journal of Systematic and Floristic Botany

Three hundred seventy nine species of Polemoniaceae are arranged in a phylogenetic classification composed of three subfamilies, eight tribes, and 26 genera. Nomenclature of one tribe is clarified and the circumscription of several tribes differs greatly from previous classifications. Five new genera, Bryantiella, Dayia, Lathrocasis, Microgilia, and Saltugilia, are proposed. In addition, four new species are described from the genera Allophyllum, Dayia, Giliastrum, and lpomopsis. This treatment represents a major reclassification with 59 new combinations, and the application of several additional combinations not used in recent years.


An Expanded Circumscription Of Bouteloua (Gramineae: Choridoideae): New Combinations And Names, J. Travis Columbus Jan 1999

An Expanded Circumscription Of Bouteloua (Gramineae: Choridoideae): New Combinations And Names, J. Travis Columbus

Aliso: A Journal of Systematic and Floristic Botany

Cladistic analysis of nuclear ribosomal and chloroplast DNA sequences has revealed that the New World grass genus Bouteloua (Chloridoideae) is not monophyletic. Indeed, some species of Bouteloua are more closely related to species in other genera than to congeners. The problem was dealt with by expanding the circumscription of Bouteloua to include species formerly positioned in the satellite genera Buchloe (1 species), Buchlomimus/em> (1), Cathestecum/em> (4), Cyclostachya/em> (1), Griffithsochloa (1), Opizia (2), Pentarrhaphis (3), Pringleochloa (1), and Soderstromia(1). Thirteen new combinations and names were necessary. As here circumscribed, Bouteloua is monophyletic and comprises 57 species.


Problems In Cladistic Classification: Higher-Level Relationships In Land Plants, Peter R. Crane, Paul Kenrick Jan 1997

Problems In Cladistic Classification: Higher-Level Relationships In Land Plants, Peter R. Crane, Paul Kenrick

Aliso: A Journal of Systematic and Floristic Botany

Recent cladistic analyses of green plants recognize an extensive hierarchical series of relatively well-supported monophyletic groups. Translating this hierarchical pattern of relationships into a usable and informative written classification is important for purposes of scientific communication, research and teaching. However, in the context of the "Linnean" hierarchy, as manifested in the current International code of Botanical Nomenclature (ICBN), effecting this translation confronts substantial practical difficulties--especially the proliferation of hierarchical levels. These problems are exacerbated by the current emphasis of the ICBN on a hierarchy in which different ranks have different formal rank-based endings. These difficulties could be ameliorated by de-emphasizing ...


Hierarchial Roots And Shoots Or Opera Jehovae Magna! (Psalms 111:2), Dan H. Nicolson Jan 1997

Hierarchial Roots And Shoots Or Opera Jehovae Magna! (Psalms 111:2), Dan H. Nicolson

Aliso: A Journal of Systematic and Floristic Botany

The philosophy of Linnaeus's classification, Systema Naturae, is briefly reviewed, as well as those of post-Linnaean systems of plant classification. Texts of current codes of nomenclature pertaining to hierarchy, including associated rank terminations, are compared.


The Linnaean Hierarchy And The Evolutionization Of Taxonomy, With Emphasis On The Problem Of Nomenclature, Kevin De Queiroz Jan 1997

The Linnaean Hierarchy And The Evolutionization Of Taxonomy, With Emphasis On The Problem Of Nomenclature, Kevin De Queiroz

Aliso: A Journal of Systematic and Floristic Botany

During the post-Darwinian history of taxonomy, the Linnaean hierarchy has maintained its role as a means for representing hierarchical taxonomic relationships. During the same period, the principle of descent has taken on an increasingly important role as the basis for reformulated versions of fundamental taxonomic concepts and principles. Early in this history, the principle of descent provided an explanation for the existence of taxa and implied a nested, hierarchical structure for taxonomic relationships. Although an evolutionary explanation for taxa contradicted the Aristotelian context within which the Linnaean hierarchy was developed, the nested, hierarchical structure of taxonomic rela· tionships implied by ...


Correct Common Names Of Herbage Plants, B J. Quinlivan Jan 1971

Correct Common Names Of Herbage Plants, B J. Quinlivan

Journal of the Department of Agriculture, Western Australia, Series 4

NEARLY all plants have both a scientific name and a common name. Some, unfortunately, have two, three, four or more common names, and this causes a great deal of confusion, particularly in the buying and selling of pasture seeds.


Why Botanical Names Are Necessary, Robert Dunlop Royce Jan 1967

Why Botanical Names Are Necessary, Robert Dunlop Royce

Journal of the Department of Agriculture, Western Australia, Series 4

BOTANISTS engaged in naming plants are ofen asked "Why can't you speak English?"

The answer becomes quite clear as the inquirers learn more and more about plants and find people calling the same plant by quite different names.