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Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Wastewater Management: A Model In Interdisciplinary Studies, Frederick P. Deluca, Craig B. Davis, Arnold Van Der Valk Oct 1976

Wastewater Management: A Model In Interdisciplinary Studies, Frederick P. Deluca, Craig B. Davis, Arnold Van Der Valk

Botany Publication and Papers

Interdisciplinary studies should be part of the high school curriculum. But the sheer difficulties presented to teachers of di gesting new material in their free time and then implementing it in a system which tends to be rigid and highly struc tured, often combine to squelch any movement in the interdisciplinary direction.

An experimental program in waste water management that we at the Iowa State University helped to integrate into nine central Iowa high schools last year utilized a unique team approach which helped to alleviate many of the usual ob stacles. This article describes the project, in the belief ...


G76-324 Limiting Feed Intake With Salt, T.D. Rich, Steve Armbruster, D.R. Gill Jan 1976

G76-324 Limiting Feed Intake With Salt, T.D. Rich, Steve Armbruster, D.R. Gill

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Cattlemen are aware of the impact high cost labor has on profit; thus, management procedures which reduce labor requirements are important. One management tool frequently used is regulating feed intake with salt.

In addition, self-feeding supplements tend to allow timid, slow-eating cows to get their share and it is an easy method of providing Vitamin A, phosphorus and other feed additives. However, there are disadvantages to feeding salt-concentrate mixes. Salt is not a precise regulator of intake since certain individuals will tolerate more salt than others and abundant water is essential.

Daily salt requirement for mature cattle is less than ...


G76-321 Use Of Energy Values In Ration Formulation, Paul Q. Guyer Jan 1976

G76-321 Use Of Energy Values In Ration Formulation, Paul Q. Guyer

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide contains information on the use of high energy values in ration formulation.

Ruminants digest feedstuffs primarily by fermentation in the rumen. This allows ruminant animals to use both roughages and grains as sources of carbohydrates for energy. Part of the carbohydrates pass through the rumen and are digested in the abomasum and small intestine. Most carbohydrates in feeds are converted to either acetic, propionic or butyric acid by rumen bacteria and protozoa. These short chain fatty acids are then absorbed through the rumen wall into the blood stream and eventually are used for energy in body tissue.


Heg76-36 Sewing With Plaids (Revised January 1987), Rose Marie Tondl Jan 1976

Heg76-36 Sewing With Plaids (Revised January 1987), Rose Marie Tondl

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide contains useful suggestions for sewing with plaids.

Plaids remain popular and have no season. They can create dramatic effects, be dainty, gay, subtle or forceful. Their coloring may be rich, subdued or bizarre, depending upon the spacing combination and intensity of colors. Whatever the desired effect, perfection in matching plaids can make an inexpensive dress look expensive.


G76-294 Band Application Of Herbicides (Revised March 1986), Russell S. Moomaw, Alex Martin Jan 1976

G76-294 Band Application Of Herbicides (Revised March 1986), Russell S. Moomaw, Alex Martin

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Many row crop producers prefer to use hebicide band applications because of reduced costs. Savings can be substantial with the more expensive materials. Properly applied, band applications of herbicides can satisfactorily protect the crop from weed growth. Herbicide row banding can be done either at crop planting time or postemergence after the crop and weeds have emerged.


G76-292 Home Fruit Spray Schedules (Revised May 1986), Frederick P. Baxendale, Don Steinegger, David Wysong Jan 1976

G76-292 Home Fruit Spray Schedules (Revised May 1986), Frederick P. Baxendale, Don Steinegger, David Wysong

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Insects and diseases of home fruit plantings must be controlled to produce quality fruit. Home orchards must be sprayed several times during the growing season. Spraying only a few times will not produce acceptable results for most fruits.

This NebGuide discusses the types of sprays, sprayers, insecticides, insecticides and fungicides used to control insects.


G76-312 What Are Good Labor Relations?, Robert E. Perry Jan 1976

G76-312 What Are Good Labor Relations?, Robert E. Perry

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Good labor relations is the factor most often identified as necessary for successful employment by farm employees. Farmers who employ hired labor also rate "good labor relations" as an important factor, though many rate good wages as more important

What are "good labor relations"? From answers received from employees, they appear to involve a mixture of human characteristics and open communications that build mutual respect and loyalty.


G76-303 Large Round Bale Safety (Revised June 1995), Robert D. Grisso, David Morgan, Rollin D. Schnieder Jan 1976

G76-303 Large Round Bale Safety (Revised June 1995), Robert D. Grisso, David Morgan, Rollin D. Schnieder

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide covers the safety aspects for equipment used in large round bale packages such as: balers, front-end loaders, bale handling and transport devices.

Large round baling creates unique safety problems for farmers and ranchers. Large round balers have many moving parts that can cause injury or death if a person becomes entangled. Never leave the tractor seat until the PTO (power take-off) has been disengaged, the engine is shut off, and all moving parts have stopped.


G76-284 Hand Signals For Agriculture, Rollin D. Schnieder Jan 1976

G76-284 Hand Signals For Agriculture, Rollin D. Schnieder

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide contains hand signals useful for communicating around noisy equipment and from a distance.

Throughout history, man has devised methods of contacting others who were out of voice range or who could not be heard because of excess noise. The Indians were skilled at using smoke signals or by imitating some form of wildlife such as the owl or coyote.

The early explorers used other signs to guide them. The slashing of bark on trees or sticks pointed in a certain direction were keys for keeping the persons from getting lost or for others to follow.

The railroad used ...


Heg76-42 Wool And Wool Blends (Revised January 1985), Rose Marie Tondl Jan 1976

Heg76-42 Wool And Wool Blends (Revised January 1985), Rose Marie Tondl

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide contains information about buying and sewing wool and wool blends.

Wool is a unique fiber. It is a natural fiber made from the fleece of sheep. Wool fabrics are not all alike. They come in a variety of textures and weights. Wool can be sheer, thin, soft, thick, stiff or anything in between. Wool fabrics are constructed by weaving, knitting or felting.


G76-307 Bull Selection, Robert Taylor Jan 1976

G76-307 Bull Selection, Robert Taylor

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The primary functions of the bull in a beef management program are two-fold: (1) contribute to the production of live calves and (2) contribute to the genetic improvement of economically important traits.

This NebGuide discusses how to select bulls to improve your herd.


G76-279 Processing Deer, Glenn W. Froning, P. S. Gipson Jan 1976

G76-279 Processing Deer, Glenn W. Froning, P. S. Gipson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

It is important to process game properly to obtain maximum flavor and storage stability.

It is a pleasure to hunt game, but perhaps an even greater satisfaction comes from eating the meat. In order to have a flavorful experience, the game animal must be handled, processed and prepared properly. If the game is improperly processed or handled, one may lose much of the desirable flavor and storage stability.


G76-301 How To Tell Corn, Sorghum Maturity, J.D. Eastin, J.T. Hultquist, C.Y. Sullivan Jan 1976

G76-301 How To Tell Corn, Sorghum Maturity, J.D. Eastin, J.T. Hultquist, C.Y. Sullivan

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Researchers have discovered a way to tell when corn and grain sorghum have stopped filling — when they are physiologically mature. A layer of cells near the point where the kernel is attached to the plant turns dark brown as the kernel nears maturity and, finally, black when the kernel is mature.

This NebGuide discusses how to read maturity in the layers of corn and sorghum.


G76-315 Establishing Black Walnut, Rick Hamilton, Neal E. Jennings Jan 1976

G76-315 Establishing Black Walnut, Rick Hamilton, Neal E. Jennings

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This publication contains information on establishing a black walnut plantation.

Based on current market conditions, $20,000 to $30,000 worth of black walnut timber can be harvested from a managed acre within 50 years. The total cost of establishing an acre rarely exceeds $100, including site preparation, cost of seedlings, planting, and weed control. The decision to invest in a walnut plantation can be based on:

1. The rate of return on $100 per acre invested is 11.3 percent to 11.9 percent, yielding $20,000 to $30,000 within 50 years. The same investment at 6 percent ...


G76-314 Native Wood Fence Posts (Revised February 1990), Thomas L. Schmidt, Michael R. Kuhns Jan 1976

G76-314 Native Wood Fence Posts (Revised February 1990), Thomas L. Schmidt, Michael R. Kuhns

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This guide evaluates native Nebraska tree species for use as wooden fence posts.

Fencing is a major part of most farming and ranching operations. Fences are costly and require regular repair and maintenance. Wood fence posts cut from native Nebraska trees can be less expensive than steel posts or wood posts imported from other states. When deciding whether to use native wood fence posts, consider durability, availability and ease of handling.


Ec76-1741 Christmas Trees: A Management Guide, Donald E. Janssen, Neal E. Jennings Jan 1976

Ec76-1741 Christmas Trees: A Management Guide, Donald E. Janssen, Neal E. Jennings

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

In America the decorated Christmas tree has become an accepted tradition. Christmas would seem barren to most people without it. Raising Christmas trees is a growing industry and has proven to be a profitable use of land if high-quality, salable trees are produced.

Planting, managing, and harvesting Christmas trees is a high labor, high risk endeavor. Here is a list of questions. If you can answer "yes" to every one, you will be a successful Christmas tree grower.

Are you willing to plant trees every April?

Are you willing to shear or prune every tree, every year (mid-June to mid-July ...


G76-271 When To Harvest Fruits And Vegetables (Revised July 1982), Don Steinegger, Luann Finke Jan 1976

G76-271 When To Harvest Fruits And Vegetables (Revised July 1982), Don Steinegger, Luann Finke

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

To obtain a quality food product from your garden for fresh use or storage, you must harvest fruits and vegetables at their proper stage of development. Improper harvesting influences quality as well as continued productivity of the plant. This is a guide to harvesting some of the common fruits and vegetables grown in Nebraska.


G76-325 Sweet Clover Poisoning, I,A. Schipper Jan 1976

G76-325 Sweet Clover Poisoning, I,A. Schipper

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Sweet clover poisoning is a problem of varying frequency and intensity in livestock wherever sweet clover grows. The toxic compound produced in sweet clover prevents normal blood clotting resulting in hemorrhages and associated symptoms.

This publication covers which animals are most susceptible, the cause, prevention, management, and treatment of sweet clover poisoning.


G76-322 How To Handle Insect And Plant Specimens For Identification (Revised March 1985), Luanne Coziahr, Stephen D. Danielson, John Furrer, Don Steinegger Jan 1976

G76-322 How To Handle Insect And Plant Specimens For Identification (Revised March 1985), Luanne Coziahr, Stephen D. Danielson, John Furrer, Don Steinegger

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The Nebraska Cooperative Extension Service offers the public a pest/plant identification service. Under this service, insects, weeds, plant diseases, and horticultural plants are identified and, if appropriate, methods for their prevention or control are recommended. Diagnoses of plant problems and control recommendations will be more precise if specimens are handled according to the suggestions offered in this NebGuide.


G76-308 Principles Of Beef Cattle Selection, H.A. Fitzhugh, Jr. Jan 1976

G76-308 Principles Of Beef Cattle Selection, H.A. Fitzhugh, Jr.

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Selection of superior seedstock leads to lasting genetic improvement by increasing the frequency of "desirable" genes and decreasing frequency of "undesirable" genes. The definition of "desirable" varies. Nature favors genes which improve fitness to survive and thrive in the natural environment. Man should favor genes which improve biological and economic efficiency of beef production.

The concepts, definitions, formulas and symbols that are the tools necessary for effective selection programs are discussed in this publication.