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Legal research

2017

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Articles 1 - 21 of 21

Full-Text Articles in Law

Leaky Boundaries And The Decline Of The Autonomous Law School Library, James G. Milles Nov 2017

Leaky Boundaries And The Decline Of The Autonomous Law School Library, James G. Milles

James G. Milles

Academic law librarians have long insisted on the value of autonomy from the university library system, usually basing their arguments on strict adherence to ABA standards. However, law librarians have failed to construct an explicit and consistent definition of autonomy. Lacking such a definition, they have tended to rely on an outmoded Langdellian view of the law as a closed system. This view has long been discredited, as approaches such as law and economics and sociolegal research have become mainstream, and courts increasingly resort to nonlegal sources of information. Blind attachment to autonomy as a goal rather than a means …


Access To Justice Starts In The Library: The Importance Of Competent Research Skills And Free/Low-Cost Research Resources, Deborah K. Hackerson Oct 2017

Access To Justice Starts In The Library: The Importance Of Competent Research Skills And Free/Low-Cost Research Resources, Deborah K. Hackerson

Maine Law Review

Access to justice is an important aspirational goal for everyone in the legal profession. Lawyers, however, cannot provide access to justice without adequate practical skills and the tools necessary to complete their work. Lawyers and law students provide many hours of public and pro bono service every year. With the current state of the economy and the record jobless rate, it is likely that the need for low cost and free legal services will continue to grow. In order to carry out the mission of continuing to provide services to those in need, law students must prepare learn the practical …


Finding The Theory And Method For The Pedagogy Of Teaching Legal Research: A Response To Callister's "Time To Blossom", Paul Jerome Mclaughlin Jr. Aug 2017

Finding The Theory And Method For The Pedagogy Of Teaching Legal Research: A Response To Callister's "Time To Blossom", Paul Jerome Mclaughlin Jr.

Library Faculty Publications

In his article “Time to Blossom,” Callister invites legal research experts to begin a discussion as to what theory and methodology would be most effective for teaching legal research. This article suggests that utilizing a tailored form of systems theory in conjunction with active learning methods would allow legal educators not only to teach students in an effective and understandable manner but also to adapt their teaching methods to correspond to changes in the legal research field.


Data For The Algorithm As A Human Artifact: Implications For Legal [Re]Search, Susan Nevelow Mart Jul 2017

Data For The Algorithm As A Human Artifact: Implications For Legal [Re]Search, Susan Nevelow Mart

Research Data

These documents underlie and are cited in this empirical study: Susan Nevelow Mart, The Algorithm as a Human Artifact: Implications for Legal [Re]Search, 109 Law Libr. J. 387, 409 n.123 (2017), available at http://scholar.law.colorado.edu/articles/755/.

The ZIP file contains three files: one PDF document ("Tables for Charts 1-3"), and two SPSS files ("Data Archive" and "Syntax Archive" (SPSS version 24)). The "Syntax Archive" file may be viewed in a text editor (e.g., Notepad) as well as in SPSS.


Appendix B: The Algorithm As A Human Artifact: Implications For Legal [Re]Search, Susan Nevelow Mart Jul 2017

Appendix B: The Algorithm As A Human Artifact: Implications For Legal [Re]Search, Susan Nevelow Mart

Research Data

This document, "Search Instructions for Algorithm Study," is an electronic Appendix B to, and is cited in, the empirical study: Susan Nevelow Mart, The Algorithm as a Human Artifact: Implications for Legal [Re]Search, 109 Law Libr. J. 387, 400 n.78 (2017), available at http://scholar.law.colorado.edu/articles/755/.


Decision Making Models In 2/2 Time: Two Speakers, Two Models (Maybe), Sharon Bradley, Tim Tarvin Jun 2017

Decision Making Models In 2/2 Time: Two Speakers, Two Models (Maybe), Sharon Bradley, Tim Tarvin

Presentations

Our students have to learn so many new skills to be successful in law school and law practice. Legal research, client interviewing, and case analysis just for starters. Our teaching methods have to engage our students while preparing them to “think like a lawyer.” We also have the responsibility to familiarize students in evaluating the “benefits and risks associated with relevant technology” and to develop efficient practices and processes. The speakers will look at decision making models that are practical and useable.

One speaker will discuss his experiences in a clinical setting using decision trees, teaching his students to visualize …


Surveying The Landscape As Technology Revolutionizes Media Coverage Of Appellate Courts, Howard J. Bashman Apr 2017

Surveying The Landscape As Technology Revolutionizes Media Coverage Of Appellate Courts, Howard J. Bashman

The Journal of Appellate Practice and Process

No abstract provided.


Legal Writing And International Students: Reconsidering “Complete Immersion”, Alissa J. Hartig Apr 2017

Legal Writing And International Students: Reconsidering “Complete Immersion”, Alissa J. Hartig

Applied Linguistics Faculty Publications and Presentations

Before I began my current position, I worked as a writing specialist with multilingual international students in the LL.M. legal writing program at Penn State Law for four years. At the time I started working with law students, I was taking coursework for my Ph.D. in applied linguistics, focusing on second language acquisition and writing. Since I was new to the field of legal education, I tried to get a better sense of what legal writing faculty saw as best practices in working with international students by speaking with faculty, reading articles in law reviews and journals, and attending conferences. …


Juvenile Justice Research To Policy And The Case Of Fines, Alex R. Piquero Mar 2017

Juvenile Justice Research To Policy And The Case Of Fines, Alex R. Piquero

Nevada Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Real Resources For Researching Ip Law, Anne Burnett Feb 2017

Real Resources For Researching Ip Law, Anne Burnett

Presentations

A presentation on strategies for researching intellectual property law in classroom L. Sponsored by the Alexander Campbell King Law Library and the Intellectual Property Law Society.


Federal Research, Yolanda Patrice Jones Phd, Mls Feb 2017

Federal Research, Yolanda Patrice Jones Phd, Mls

Faculty Books and Book Contributions

Finding legal information in the United States can be difficult and/or confusing for the layperson. Electronic databases such as LexisNexis or Westlaw may only be accessible for those who can afford it. Even with access to these databases, those without legal training may find them to be overwhelming. This chapter aims to shed some light on the process of doing federal legal research as well as recommend Internet sites where the layperson can get access to free legal resources.


Bibliography, Editorial Board Feb 2017

Bibliography, Editorial Board

The University of New Hampshire Law Review

This bibliography is a comprehensive list of all of Professor Calvin Massey’s scholarship. Unless otherwise indicated, each title was written exclusively by Professor Massey. We have not, however, included every edition of each title; rather, where multiple editions were published, we reference only the first edition. We have also omitted supplements written by Professor Massey to his own casebooks.


Knowing Defense, Janet Moore, Andrew L.B. Davies Jan 2017

Knowing Defense, Janet Moore, Andrew L.B. Davies

Faculty Articles and Other Publications

The field of empirical research on public defense is in an early stage of development. Yet the field is also diverse, as a growing community of researchers applies training in disciplines ranging from law and criminology to economics and social psychology. These facts invite reflection on baseline questions about the field that may inform future work. For example, what factors shape our research agendas? What data, methods, and theories are in play? Do these new research agendas align with the research priorities of public defenders and the communities they serve? Should they do so? To begin exploring such questions, this …


Update Your Bookmarks! Great Sites For Effective Research, Nancy E. Vettorello Jan 2017

Update Your Bookmarks! Great Sites For Effective Research, Nancy E. Vettorello

Articles

There are more than one billion websites available online. Many are useful tools for attorneys, so it makes sense to review and refresh your favorite bookmarks regularly. While none of the many free sites offer the sophisticated search abilities of fee-based research services, a few minutes spent exploring free sites can help researchers significantly narrow their searches once they turn to a fee-based system. Remember to always take advantage of the advancesearch option when available on a free site. Free sites are offering increasingly sophisticated search options, such as Boolean and proximity searches, which were previously exclusive to paid services.


Resurrecting (And Modernizing) The Research Treasure Hunt, Nancy E. Vettorello Jan 2017

Resurrecting (And Modernizing) The Research Treasure Hunt, Nancy E. Vettorello

Articles

First-year associates will spend forty-five percent of their time on legal research; second- and third-year associates will spend thirty percent. And unfortunately, employers find their associates’ research skills lacking. This is not a new complaint. Employers have been complaining for more than a hundred years that recent law graduates cannot research well. None of this is lost on those who teach legal research, who have long debated the best way to do so. Techniques for teaching research have changed over time, and methods once thought appropriate were sometimes later disfavored. Changes were driven both by pedagogy and by the ever-changing …


Every Algorithm Has A Pov, Susan Nevelow Mart Jan 2017

Every Algorithm Has A Pov, Susan Nevelow Mart

Publications

When legal researchers search in online databases for the information they need to solve a legal problem, they need to remember that the algorithms that are returning results to them were designed by humans. The world of legal research is a human-constructed world, and the biases and assumptions the teams of humans that construct the online world bring to the task are imported into the systems we use for research. This article takes a look at what happens when six different teams of humans set out to solve the same problem: how to return results relevant to a searcher’s query …


A Guide To Legal Research In Virginia, Joyce Manna Janto Jan 2017

A Guide To Legal Research In Virginia, Joyce Manna Janto

Law Faculty Publications

The primary goal of this new edition of A Guide to Legal Research in Virginia is to expand coverage in several chapters and to add a new chapter covering legal ethics materials. This edition also notes changes in the URLs for many Virginia government websites. Most of these changes are likely based on changes in administrations and technological upgrades. The researcher should be aware that there is a lack of consistency among Virginia government web addresses. Changes in the operation and coverage of the major legal databases are noted where appropriate. Today, Virginia practitioners have a wide variety of resources, …


The Algorithm As A Human Artifact: Implications For Legal [Re]Search, Susan Nevelow Mart Jan 2017

The Algorithm As A Human Artifact: Implications For Legal [Re]Search, Susan Nevelow Mart

Publications

The results of using the search algorithms in Westlaw, Lexis Advance, Fastcase, Google Scholar, Ravel, and Casetext are compared. Six groups of humans created six different algorithms, and the results are a testament to the variability of human problem solving. That variability has implications both for researching and teaching research.


New Wine In Old Wineskins: Metaphor And Legal Research, Amy E. Sloan, Colin Starger Jan 2017

New Wine In Old Wineskins: Metaphor And Legal Research, Amy E. Sloan, Colin Starger

Notre Dame Law Review Reflection

This Essay argues that conceptualizing emerging legal technologies using inherited research metaphors is like pouring new wine in old wineskins—it simply doesn’t work. This Essay proposes to replace outdated research metaphors with updated metaphors that can provide the fresh wineskin to conceptualize current research challenges.


Thinking On Your Feet: Reflections Of A First-Time Online Instructor, Ashley A. Ahlbrand Jan 2017

Thinking On Your Feet: Reflections Of A First-Time Online Instructor, Ashley A. Ahlbrand

Articles by Maurer Faculty

Online education continues to rise in popularity for both undergraduate and graduate education. Among the reasons commonly stated for this preference is flexibility, both of time and location. It came as little surprise, therefore, when our Law Library’s long-term proposal to develop an online advanced legal research course found itself on the fast track. This article will discuss the process we went through to develop this course, the end result, and the lessons learned along the way.


Research Algorithms Have A Point Of View: The Effect Of Human Decision Making On Your Search Results, Susan Nevelow Mart Jan 2017

Research Algorithms Have A Point Of View: The Effect Of Human Decision Making On Your Search Results, Susan Nevelow Mart

Publications

No abstract provided.