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Full-Text Articles in Law

“Some Things Are Too Hot To Touch”: Competency, The Right To Sexual Autonomy, And The Roles Of Lawyers And Expert Witnesses, Michael L. Perlin, Alison J. Lynch, Valerie R. Mcclain Jan 2019

“Some Things Are Too Hot To Touch”: Competency, The Right To Sexual Autonomy, And The Roles Of Lawyers And Expert Witnesses, Michael L. Perlin, Alison J. Lynch, Valerie R. Mcclain

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


Involuntarily Committed Patients As Prisoners, Matt Lamkin, Carl Elliott May 2017

Involuntarily Committed Patients As Prisoners, Matt Lamkin, Carl Elliott

University of Richmond Law Review

Part I relates several stories of involuntarily committed patients who were recruited into studies posing serious risks. Part II draws on these cases to argue that the involuntary commitment of these patients leaves them vulnerable to unethical treatment by researchers. Their inherently coercive circumstances present an overwhelming obstacle to voluntary consent, and their captive status makes them attractive targets for research that could be performed using less vulnerable subjects.

Part III argues that most research on this patient population is improper under generally applicable principles of informed consent and fair subject selection. However, existing protections have proved insufficient to prevent ...


Medicare Advantage Special Needs Plans For “Institutionalized Individuals”: What Advantage To Enrollment?, Alissa Eden Halperin, Patricia Nemore, Vicki Gottlich, Toby Edelman Jan 2007

Medicare Advantage Special Needs Plans For “Institutionalized Individuals”: What Advantage To Enrollment?, Alissa Eden Halperin, Patricia Nemore, Vicki Gottlich, Toby Edelman

Saint Louis University Journal of Health Law & Policy

No abstract provided.


Court-Connected Mediation Compared: The Case Of Argentina And The United States, Timothy K. Kuhner Jan 2005

Court-Connected Mediation Compared: The Case Of Argentina And The United States, Timothy K. Kuhner

ILSA Journal of International & Comparative Law

This article presents and compares data collected in Argentina and the United States during each country's initial experience with court-connected mediation.


What Happens When Mediation Is Institutionalized?: To The Parties, Practitioners, And Host Institutions, James J. Alfini, John Barkai, Robert Baruch Bush, Michele Hermann, Jonathan Hyman, Kimberlee Kovach, Carol B. Liebman, Sharon Press, Leonard Riskin Jan 1994

What Happens When Mediation Is Institutionalized?: To The Parties, Practitioners, And Host Institutions, James J. Alfini, John Barkai, Robert Baruch Bush, Michele Hermann, Jonathan Hyman, Kimberlee Kovach, Carol B. Liebman, Sharon Press, Leonard Riskin

Faculty Scholarship

The Alternative Dispute Resolution Section of the Association of American Law Schools presented a program, at the 1994 AALS Conference, on the institutionalization of mediation – through courtconnected programs and otherwise. The topic is an important one, because this phenomenon has become increasingly common in recent years. Moreover, the topic seemed especially appropriate for the 1994 program, since Florida – the host state for the conference – was one of the first states to adopt a comprehensive statute providing for court-ordered mediation (at the trial judge's option) in civil disputes of all kinds. The move toward institutionalizing mediation has raised many questions ...


What Happens When Mediation Is Institutionalized?: To The Parties, Practitioners And Host Institutions, James J. Alfini, John Barkai, Robert A. Baruch Bush, Michele Hermann, Jonathan Hyman, Kimberlee Kovach, Carol B. Liebman, Sharon Press, Leonard Riskin Jan 1994

What Happens When Mediation Is Institutionalized?: To The Parties, Practitioners And Host Institutions, James J. Alfini, John Barkai, Robert A. Baruch Bush, Michele Hermann, Jonathan Hyman, Kimberlee Kovach, Carol B. Liebman, Sharon Press, Leonard Riskin

Faculty Scholarship

The Alternative Dispute Resolution Section of the Association of American Law Schools presented a program, at the 1994 AALS Conference, on the institutionalization of mediation – through court-connected programs and otherwise. The topic is an important one, because this phenomenon has become increasingly common. Moreover, the topic seemed especially appropriate for the 1994 program, since Florida – the host state for the conference – was one of the first states to adopt a comprehensive statute providing for court-ordered mediation (at the trial judge’s option) in civil disputes of all kinds. The move toward institutionalizing mediation has raised many questions, and the program ...


Accountability Versus Privacy: The Plight Of Institutionalized Emotionally Disturbed Children, Katherine M. Lordi Jan 1977

Accountability Versus Privacy: The Plight Of Institutionalized Emotionally Disturbed Children, Katherine M. Lordi

Fordham Urban Law Journal

This article examines the an individual's right to privacy in relation to the state's interest in a smoothly-functioning system of mental health care for minors and concludes with some general guidelines for institutional accountability. The articles states that in order to balance the right of an institutionalized patient to be free from unwarranted invasions of privacy with the public's demand for transparency and accountability, two tasks must be confronted: (1) the limits of institutional and managerial accountability must be defined; and (2) the public's need to know must be balanced with a respect for the patient ...