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Full-Text Articles in Law

Slides: Unquenchable, Robert Glennon Jun 2009

Slides: Unquenchable, Robert Glennon

Western Water Law, Policy and Management: Ripples, Currents, and New Channels for Inquiry (Martz Summer Conference, June 3-5)

Presenter: Robert Glennon, Morris K. Udall Professor of Law and Public Policy, James E. Rogers College of Law, University of Arizona

56 slides


Slides: Dam Building And Removal On The Elwha: A Prototype Of Adaptive Mismanagement And A Tribal Opportunity, William H. Rodgers, Jr. Jun 2007

Slides: Dam Building And Removal On The Elwha: A Prototype Of Adaptive Mismanagement And A Tribal Opportunity, William H. Rodgers, Jr.

The Future of Natural Resources Law and Policy (Summer Conference, June 6-8)

Presenter: William H. Rodgers, Jr., Stimson Bullitt Professor of Environmental Law, University of Washington School of Law

77 slides


Slides: Forestry On The Yakama Reservation: The Balancing Of Natural Resources Management, Philip Rigdon Jun 2005

Slides: Forestry On The Yakama Reservation: The Balancing Of Natural Resources Management, Philip Rigdon

Community-Owned Forests: Possibilities, Experiences, and Lessons Learned (June 16-19)

Presenter: Philip Rigdon, Yakama Nation, Toppenish, WA

64 slides


Trail Smelter Déjà Vu: Extraterritoriality, International Environmental Law And The Search For Solutions To Canadian-U.S. Transboundary Water Pollution Disputes, Austen L. Parrish Jan 2005

Trail Smelter Déjà Vu: Extraterritoriality, International Environmental Law And The Search For Solutions To Canadian-U.S. Transboundary Water Pollution Disputes, Austen L. Parrish

Articles by Maurer Faculty

In the 1930s, a privately owned smelting plant in Trail, Canada was the focus of the most famous case in international environmental law: the Trail Smelter Arbitration. But the subject of that landmark case has not gone away. Over the last seventy years, the Trail smelter dumped millions of tons of mercury, arsenic, and toxic waste into the Columbia River. The dumping's effects have been felt in neighboring Washington State, where the toxic discharges have caused environmental harm. In 2003, the EPA began investigating the Washington border area for designation as a Superfund (CERCLA) site, and controversially demanded that the …


Applying A Game Theory Model To Conflict And Cooperation On The Columbia River, Marcos Martinez Jun 2004

Applying A Game Theory Model To Conflict And Cooperation On The Columbia River, Marcos Martinez

Student Thesis Honors (1996-2008)

Game Theory represents a powerful analytical model with which we can examine the strategies that different states make when negotiating international watercourses. Although economists have applied game theory to a wide variety of conflict models, international water law scholars like Steven McCaffrey have largely limited themselves to applying traditional international law principles to the law governing international watercourses. Other scholars have applied game theory to international law, but few have connected international water law with game theory. Those few that have made the connection have focused on the recurring disputes in the Middle East. By contrast, I will attempt to …


Either/Or? Will Climate Change Force A Choice Between Salmon And Electricity In The Northwest?, John M. Volkman Jun 2003

Either/Or? Will Climate Change Force A Choice Between Salmon And Electricity In The Northwest?, John M. Volkman

Water, Climate and Uncertainty: Implications for Western Water Law, Policy, and Management (Summer Conference, June 11-13)

12 pages and 16 slides

Includes bibliographical references

"John M. Volkman, Partner, Stoel Rives LLP, Portland, Oregon"


Climate Variability And Western Water: What Can We Expect?, Roger S. Pulwarty Jun 2000

Climate Variability And Western Water: What Can We Expect?, Roger S. Pulwarty

Water and Growth in the West (Summer Conference, June 7-9)

7 pages.


An Environmental Perspective On Collaboration In Large Ecosystem Restoration Processes, Daniel F. Luecke Jun 1999

An Environmental Perspective On Collaboration In Large Ecosystem Restoration Processes, Daniel F. Luecke

Strategies in Western Water Law and Policy: Courts, Coercion and Collaboration (Summer Conference, June 8-11)

13 pages (includes illustration).

Contains 3 pages of references.


Agenda: Dams: Water And Power In The New West, University Of Colorado Boulder. Natural Resources Law Center Jun 1997

Agenda: Dams: Water And Power In The New West, University Of Colorado Boulder. Natural Resources Law Center

Dams: Water and Power in the New West (Summer Conference, June 2-4)

Conference organizers and/or speakers included University of Colorado School of Law professors David H. Getches, Douglas S. Kenney, Kathryn M. Mutz, Elizabeth Ann (Betsy) Rieke, Charles F. Wilkinson and Lawrence J. MacDonnell.

The keynote address by Charles F. Wilkinson is titled Coming to Grips with Growth in the West: Traditional Communities, Free Rivers and the New Megalopoli, and it will be held on Monday, June 2, at 12:30 p.m. in the Lindsley Memorial Courtroom of the law school. Wilkinson is a noted law professor, writer and authority on Western issues.

The conference will begin by providing historical context for the …


The Pacific Northwest Governors’ Comprehensive Energy Review: How Comprehensive?, Angus Duncan Jun 1997

The Pacific Northwest Governors’ Comprehensive Energy Review: How Comprehensive?, Angus Duncan

Dams: Water and Power in the New West (Summer Conference, June 2-4)

43 pages (includes illustrations).

Contains footnotes and 1 page of references.


Agenda: Biodiversity Protection: Implementation And Reform Of The Endangered Species Act, University Of Colorado Boulder. Natural Resources Law Center Jun 1996

Agenda: Biodiversity Protection: Implementation And Reform Of The Endangered Species Act, University Of Colorado Boulder. Natural Resources Law Center

Biodiversity Protection: Implementation and Reform of the Endangered Species Act (Summer Conference, June 9-12)

Conference organizers and/or faculty included University of Colorado School of Law professors Betsy Rieke, David H. Getches, Michael A. Gheleta and Charles F. Wilkinson.

All across the country--in Congress, in state legislatures and in urban and rural communities--people are discussing why we should or should not protect biodiversity and how best to do so. Since the Endangered Species Act is up for reauthorization, a variety of reform proposals are being debated. Speakers--including natural resource scholars, experts from the private and nonprofit sectors, and government officials--will examine the rationale for biodiversity protection, the legal framework of the Endangered Species Act, and …


Washington State Initiatives For Sustainable Water Use, Kenneth O. Slattery Jun 1995

Washington State Initiatives For Sustainable Water Use, Kenneth O. Slattery

Sustainable Use of the West's Water (Summer Conference, June 12-14)

8 pages.


Agenda: Sustainable Use Of The West's Water, University Of Colorado Boulder. Natural Resources Law Center Jun 1995

Agenda: Sustainable Use Of The West's Water, University Of Colorado Boulder. Natural Resources Law Center

Sustainable Use of the West's Water (Summer Conference, June 12-14)

Conference organizers and/or faculty included University of Colorado School of Law professors David H. Getches, Lawrence J. MacDonnell, Teresa A. Rice, Elizabeth A. Rieke and Charles F. Wilkinson.

Sustainable development is on the policy agenda for the '90s. What does sustainability mean? Is it a realistic concept? Are water rights compatible with sustainable use? The Center's 16th annual summer conference will explore the meaning of sustainability in the context of the West's demands, development, and natural values. Presentations by leading experts will address the broad concept of sustainable development, with a particular look at Arizona's experience. The focus will be …


Local And National Interests In Using Pub[L]Ic Forests, Andy Kerr Sep 1994

Local And National Interests In Using Pub[L]Ic Forests, Andy Kerr

Who Governs the Public Lands: Washington? The West? The Community? (September 28-30)

3 pages.


Agenda: Water Organizations In A Changing West, University Of Colorado Boulder. Natural Resources Law Center Jun 1994

Agenda: Water Organizations In A Changing West, University Of Colorado Boulder. Natural Resources Law Center

Water Organizations in a Changing West (Summer Conference, June 14-16)

Conference organizers, faculty and/or moderators included University of Colorado School of Law professors Lawrence J. MacDonnell, David H. Getches and James N. Corbridge, Jr.

Water organizations in the western United States range from small, traditional acequia associations to large metropolitan water suppliers. What do these vastly different kinds of organizations have in common? All are feeling the pressures of change in the region--growing urban populations, environmental concerns, and calls for public participation.

This year's summer program will examine how water organizations are adapting to these pressures for change. Speakers drawn from urban, agricultural, and community organizations will share their experiences …


Agenda: Boundaries And Water: Allocation And Use Of A Shared Resource, University Of Colorado Boulder. Natural Resources Law Center Jun 1989

Agenda: Boundaries And Water: Allocation And Use Of A Shared Resource, University Of Colorado Boulder. Natural Resources Law Center

Boundaries and Water: Allocation and Use of a Shared Resource (Summer Conference, June 5-7)

Conference organizers and/or faculty included University of Colorado School of Law professors David H. Getches, Lawrence J. MacDonnell and Charles F. Wilkinson.

Boundaries and Water: Allocation and Use of a Shared Resource is the topic of the Center's annual summer program on water this June. Most of the major rivers in the western United States are shared between two or more states. Often tribal governments play an important role in water allocation and use decisions. International considerations also may be involved in some cases. These interjurisdictional issues extend to groundwater as well as surface water.

This conference will provide the …


The Protection Of Instream Flows In Montana: A Legal-Institutional Perspective, Matthew J. Mckinney, Gary Fritz, Patrick Graham, Deborah Schmidt Mar 1988

The Protection Of Instream Flows In Montana: A Legal-Institutional Perspective, Matthew J. Mckinney, Gary Fritz, Patrick Graham, Deborah Schmidt

Instream Flow Protection in the Western United States: A Practical Symposium (March 31-April 1)

42 pages.

Contains references.


Protecting Instream Resources In Washington State, Robert F. Barwin, Kenneth Slattery, Steven J. Shupe Mar 1988

Protecting Instream Resources In Washington State, Robert F. Barwin, Kenneth Slattery, Steven J. Shupe

Instream Flow Protection in the Western United States: A Practical Symposium (March 31-April 1)

56 pages (includes 1 map).

Contains 10 pages of footnotes.


Introduction To The Symposium On Legal Structures For Managing The Pacific Northwest Salmon And Steelhead: The Biological And Historical Context, Dale Goble Jan 1985

Introduction To The Symposium On Legal Structures For Managing The Pacific Northwest Salmon And Steelhead: The Biological And Historical Context, Dale Goble

Articles

No abstract provided.


Recent Developments Jan 1980

Recent Developments

American Indian Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Area Of Origin And A Columbia River Diversion, Ralph W. Johnson Jan 1971

The Area Of Origin And A Columbia River Diversion, Ralph W. Johnson

Articles

In 1968 Congress declared a ten-year moratorium on any study of diversion of Columbia River water to the Southwest. One of the reasons for the moratorium was to give residents of the Pacific Northwest time to analyze their region's water needs to determine if "surplus" waters are available for export, and to establish, in a broader sense, a regional policy towards diversion proposals. This article assumes a neutral stance towards the ultimate issue of diversion and attempts only to analyze the problem of protecting the area of origin in the event of a Columbia River to Southwest interbasin water transfer. …


The Area Of Origin And A Columbia River Diversion, Ralph W. Johnson Jan 1971

The Area Of Origin And A Columbia River Diversion, Ralph W. Johnson

Articles

In 1968 Congress declared a ten-year moratorium on any study of diversion of Columbia River water to the Southwest. One of the reasons for the moratorium was to give residents of the Pacific Northwest time to analyze their region's water needs to determine if "surplus" waters are available for export, and to establish, in a broader sense, a regional policy towards diversion proposals.

This article assumes a neutral stance towards the ultimate issue of diversion and attempts only to analyze the problem of protecting the area of origin in the event of a Columbia River to Southwest interbasin water transfer.


The Canada-United States Controversy Over The Columbia River, Ralph W. Johnson Aug 1966

The Canada-United States Controversy Over The Columbia River, Ralph W. Johnson

Articles

In a comprehensive study of the recent dispute between Canada and the United States over the Columbia River, Professor Johnson traces its history through the birth of the Harmon doctrine in 1898, the signing of the Boundary Waters Treaty in 1909, and the first Canadian claim to downstream benefits in the early 1950's. Against this background, he analyzes the negotiations and events—particularly the Canadian proposals to divert the Columbia into the Fraser, and to develop the Peace River instead of the Columbia—that culminated in the Columbia River Treaty in 1961. Before Canadian ratification of the Treaty, however, additional problems presented …


The Columbia River System, Ralph W. Johnson Jan 1960

The Columbia River System, Ralph W. Johnson

Articles

In March, 1959; the International Columbia River Engineering Board submitted its report on the co-operative development of the river to the International Joint Commission. In December, 1959, that Commission submitted to the governments of Canada and the United States its recommendations for apportionment of benefits if co-operative development is undertaken. And thirdly, in the last two years there has been much attention directed at the Peace River development, which is considered by some as competitive with the Columbia. Let us examine the effects of these events on the Columbia River problem. A presentation for Panel II, Current Legal Problems Connected …


Effect Of Existing Uses On The Equitable Apportionment Of International Rivers I: An American View, Ralph W. Johnson Jan 1960

Effect Of Existing Uses On The Equitable Apportionment Of International Rivers I: An American View, Ralph W. Johnson

Articles

The dispute between the United States and Canada regarding the apportionment of the Columbia River is not settled. In March 1959, pursuant to the 1944 reference, the International Joint Conimission submitted to the governments of Canada and the United States a comprehensive engineering report on "Water Resources of the Columbia River Basin" prepared by the International Columbia River Engineering Board. This report contains three plans for utilizing the resources of the Columbia. Two of these plans include diversion of part or all of the Kootenay River into the Columbia at Columbia Lakes. All three plans would develop about the same …


Effect Of Existing Uses On The Equitable Apportionment Of International Rivers I: An American View, Ralph W. Johnson Jan 1960

Effect Of Existing Uses On The Equitable Apportionment Of International Rivers I: An American View, Ralph W. Johnson

Articles

In spite of the Boundary Waters Treaty of 1909, however, there are at least two reasons why our present topic is pertinent to the Columbia River question; first, there may be a question whether the 1909 treaty really does apply to this situation, and secondly, even if applicable the two countries may for a number of reasons desire not to rely upon its limited provisions for settlement. If the treaty is deemed not to be controlling, then other principles of international law become germane to the dispute, such as the question now before us.