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2009

University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law

Faculty Scholarship

Articles 1 - 30 of 69

Full-Text Articles in Law

Copyright For A Social Species, Robert E. Suggs Dec 2009

Copyright For A Social Species, Robert E. Suggs

Faculty Scholarship

Arguments about the proper scope of copyright protection focus on the economic consequences of varying degrees of protection. Most analysts view copyright as an economic phenomenon, and the size and health of our copyright industries measure the success of copyright policies. The constitutional text granting Congress the copyright power and the nature of special interest lobbying naturally create this economic focus; but this is a serious mistake. An exclusively economic focus makes no more sense than measuring the nutritional merits of our food supply from the size and profitability of the fast food industry.

The expressive culture that copyright protects ...


Fraud Is Fun: Or How A Foreclosure Rescue Scam Changed My Life, Peter A. Holland Oct 2009

Fraud Is Fun: Or How A Foreclosure Rescue Scam Changed My Life, Peter A. Holland

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Book Review: The Iraq War And International Law, Maxwell O. Chibundu Jul 2009

Book Review: The Iraq War And International Law, Maxwell O. Chibundu

Faculty Scholarship

A review of The Iraq War and International Law edited by Phil Shiner and Andrew Williams. Oxford, Hart Publishing, 2008.


The Google Book Search Settlement: Ends, Means, And The Future Of Books, James Grimmelmann Apr 2009

The Google Book Search Settlement: Ends, Means, And The Future Of Books, James Grimmelmann

Faculty Scholarship

For the past four years, Google has been systematically making digital copies of books in the collections of many major university libraries. It made the digital copies searchable through its web site--you couldn't read the books, but you could at least find out where the phrase you're looking for appears within them. This outraged copyright owners, who filed a class action lawsuit to make Google stop. Then, last fall, the parties to this large class action announced an even larger settlement: one that would give Google a license not only to scan books, but also to sell them ...


How To Fix The Google Book Search Settlement, James Grimmelmann Apr 2009

How To Fix The Google Book Search Settlement, James Grimmelmann

Faculty Scholarship

The proposed settlement in the Google Book Search case should be approved with strings attached. The project will be immensely good for society, and the proposed deal is a fair one for Google, for authors, and for publishers. The public interest demands, however, that the settlement be modified first. It creates two new entities—the Books Rights Registry Leviathan and the Google Book Search Behemoth—with dangerously concentrated power over the publishing industry. Left unchecked, they could trample on consumers in any number of ways. We the public have a right to demand that those entities be subject to healthy ...


An Introduction To Social Choice, Maxwell L. Stearns Mar 2009

An Introduction To Social Choice, Maxwell L. Stearns

Faculty Scholarship

Social choice studies the differing implications of the concept of rationality (or transitivity) for individuals versus groups under specified conditions and the significance of these differences in various institutional decision making contexts. This introductory chapter on social choice for the Elgar Handbook on Public Choice (Elgar Publishing Company, Dan Farber and Anne O’Connell, editors), introduces the basic framework of social choice, considers the implications of social choice for various legal and policy contexts, and provides a framework for evaluating a range of normative proposals grounded in social choice for reforming lawmaking institutions. After a brief introduction, part II introduces ...


Developing A New Model Of Support And Empowerment To Families In Need: Overcoming Historic And Ethical Barriers To Interdisciplinary Practice, Deborah J. Weimer Feb 2009

Developing A New Model Of Support And Empowerment To Families In Need: Overcoming Historic And Ethical Barriers To Interdisciplinary Practice, Deborah J. Weimer

Faculty Scholarship

This article will briefly describe the history that has led to the present disconnect between social workers and lawyers, the ethical rules that have been perceived as a barrier to effective interdisciplinary practice, including rules about lawyer independence, defining who the client is and mandated reporting of child abuse and neglect. It identifies the importance of advance planning in structuring a truly interdisciplinary practice and anticipating and addressing ethical issues. And it describes the benefits to clients as well as social work and law students of engaging in interdisciplinary practice.


Pick Your Poison: Responses To The Marketing And Sale Of Flavored Tobacco Products, Kathleen Hoke Dachille Feb 2009

Pick Your Poison: Responses To The Marketing And Sale Of Flavored Tobacco Products, Kathleen Hoke Dachille

Faculty Scholarship

This law synopsis explores legal approaches for addressing the marketing and sale of flavored tobacco products to youth.


Constitutional Faith And Dynamic Stability: Thoughts On Religion, Constitutions, And Transitions To Democracy, David C. Gray Jan 2009

Constitutional Faith And Dynamic Stability: Thoughts On Religion, Constitutions, And Transitions To Democracy, David C. Gray

Faculty Scholarship

This essay, written for the 2009 Constitutional Schmooze, explores the complex role of religion as a source of both stability and instability. Drawing on a broader body of work in transitional justice, this essay argues that religion has an important role to play in the complex web of overlapping associations and oppositions constitutive of a dynamically stable society and further contends that constitutional protections which encourage a diversity of religions provide the best hope of harnessing that potential while limiting the dangers of religion evidenced in numerous cases of mass atrocity.


Research Stories: Video Tales From The Summer Associate Workplace, Susan Herrick Jan 2009

Research Stories: Video Tales From The Summer Associate Workplace, Susan Herrick

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Troubled Waters: Mid-Twentieth Century American Society On "Trial" In The Films Of John Waters, Taunya Lovell Banks Jan 2009

Troubled Waters: Mid-Twentieth Century American Society On "Trial" In The Films Of John Waters, Taunya Lovell Banks

Faculty Scholarship

In this Article Professor Banks argues that what makes many of filmmaker John Waters early films so subversive is his use of the “white-trash” body—people marginalized by and excluded from conventional white America—as countercultural heroes. He uses the white trash body as a surrogate for talk about race and sexuality in the early 1960s. I argue that in many ways Waters’ critiques of mid-twentieth century American society reflect the societal changes that occurred in the last forty years of that century. These societal changes resulted from the civil rights, gay pride, student, anti-war and women’s movements, all ...


Physicians Who Break The Law, Diane E. Hoffmann Jan 2009

Physicians Who Break The Law, Diane E. Hoffmann

Faculty Scholarship

This paper takes as its starting point a recent article by Prof. Sandra Johnson, Regulating Physician Behavior: Taking Doctors “Bad Law” Claims Seriously. In the article, Johnson focuses on doctors who comply with the law despite their belief that the law is “bad”, i.e., causes them to behave in ways that are harmful to their patients. In Physicians Who Break the Law, I explore cases where physicians break the law claiming that it is “bad”. In this exploration, I focus on two areas of physicians’ lawbreaking: (1) violations of business-related laws, in particular, insurance fraud; and (2) violations of ...


Recalibrating The Moral Compass: Expanding "Thinking Like A Lawyer" Into "Thinking Like A Leader", Karen H. Rothenberg Jan 2009

Recalibrating The Moral Compass: Expanding "Thinking Like A Lawyer" Into "Thinking Like A Leader", Karen H. Rothenberg

Faculty Scholarship

This essay was prepared for the Leadership in Legal Education Symposium IX.


Commentary [On Negligent Infliction Of Emotional Distress], Oscar S. Gray Jan 2009

Commentary [On Negligent Infliction Of Emotional Distress], Oscar S. Gray

Faculty Scholarship

These comments question the terminology used in the Third Restatement of Torts for psychological effects, partially on the ground of obsolescence in light of developments in the neurosciences. Instead of the distinction emphasized in the Third Restatement between “physical harm” and “emotional disturbance” (or “distress”), they suggest a distinction between “harm” that constitutes an impairment of functionality, which would be treated as a free-standing basis for liability, like conventional diseases or injuries, and “mere feelings”, which would continue to be compensable in negligence only parasitically. Similarly, the interest protected should be regarded not as an interest in freedom from “disturbance ...


Brief For Amicus Curiae David A. Super: Supporting Plaintiff-Appellants Urging Reversal, In Howard V. Hawkins (2009)., David A. Super Jan 2009

Brief For Amicus Curiae David A. Super: Supporting Plaintiff-Appellants Urging Reversal, In Howard V. Hawkins (2009)., David A. Super

Faculty Scholarship

The Supreme Court has consistently held that congressional intent governs whether federal statutes are privately enforceable. Where Congress has been silent, a line of cases culminating in Gonzaga Univ. v. Doe, 536 U.S. 273 (2002), prescribes a formula for inferring congressional intent from the structure of a statute. Here, however, Congress has not been silent: the Food and Nutrition Act specifies the amount of retroactive benefits that may be awarded households in “any judicial action arising under this Act” and makes certain records of state agencies “available for review in any action filed by a household to enforce any ...


60 Years Of The Basic Law And Its Interpretation: An American Perspective, Peter E. Quint Jan 2009

60 Years Of The Basic Law And Its Interpretation: An American Perspective, Peter E. Quint

Faculty Scholarship

In commemoration of the 60th anniversary of the adoption of the German Basic Law (Constitution) , the author discusses certain aspects of the Basic Law, in comparison with the Constitution of the United States, and examines important developments in the jurisprudence if the German Constitutional Court interpreting the Basic Law.


A Circumspect Look At Problem-Solving Courts, Richard C. Boldt Jan 2009

A Circumspect Look At Problem-Solving Courts, Richard C. Boldt

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Foreword: Our Paradoxical Religion Clauses, Mark A. Graber Jan 2009

Foreword: Our Paradoxical Religion Clauses, Mark A. Graber

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Book Review: Fresh Perspectives On The "War On Terror", Katherine Vaughns Jan 2009

Book Review: Fresh Perspectives On The "War On Terror", Katherine Vaughns

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Violence On The Brain: A Critique Of Neuroscience In Criminal Law, Amanda C. Pustilnik Jan 2009

Violence On The Brain: A Critique Of Neuroscience In Criminal Law, Amanda C. Pustilnik

Faculty Scholarship

Is there such a thing as a criminally "violent brain"? Does it make sense to speak of "the neurobiology of violence" or the "psychopathology of crime"? Is it possible to answer on a physiological level what makes one person engage in criminal violence and another not, under similar circumstances?

This Article first demonstrates parallels between certain current claims about the neurobiology of criminal violence and past movements that were concerned with the law and neuroscience of violence: phrenology, Lombrosian biological criminology, and lobotomy. It then engages in a substantive review and critique of several current claims about the neurological bases ...


The Costs Of Multiple Gestation Pregnancies In Assisted Reproduction, Urska Velikonja Jan 2009

The Costs Of Multiple Gestation Pregnancies In Assisted Reproduction, Urska Velikonja

Faculty Scholarship

The United States, unlike most developed countries, does not regulate its fertility industry. Rather, it vests control over the industry to professional organizations and to market forces. While lack of regulation has produced a vibrant market for fertility services, it has also produced an undesirable consequence: a high rate of multiple gestation pregnancies, including twin pregnancies. This Article summarizes the data on the medical, psychological, and financial costs associated with multiple pregnancies to the parents, the children, and American society. It suggests that the current U.S. regulatory regime has not only failed to address these costs as they surfaced ...


Making Peace And Making Money: Economic Analysis Of The Market For Mediators In Private Practice, Urska Velikonja Jan 2009

Making Peace And Making Money: Economic Analysis Of The Market For Mediators In Private Practice, Urska Velikonja

Faculty Scholarship

Mediation has grown tremendously in the last three decades, yet only a small number of mediators have been able to benefit financially from its growth. The supply of willing mediators by far exceeds the demand for their services. Mediator trainee overoptimism and the lack of formal barriers to entry result in excess entry in the market for mediators. However, the lack of a formal barrier, but the existence of de facto barriers to entry, such as mediator selection practices and specialization, combined with excessive individual optimism, creates inefficiently high levels of entry. This is socially suboptimal: many aspirant mediators spend ...


Providing Interdisciplinary Services To At-Risk Families To Prevent The Placement Of Children In Foster Care, Deborah J. Weimer Jan 2009

Providing Interdisciplinary Services To At-Risk Families To Prevent The Placement Of Children In Foster Care, Deborah J. Weimer

Faculty Scholarship

Grandparents need support to take on the responsibility of children whose parents cannot care for them due to drug addiction, mental health issues, HIV illness, or other health problems. Without support and assistance, these families and children are likely to end up enmeshed in the already overburdened child abuse and neglect system. The University of Maryland has created a model program providing social work and legal services to at-risk grandparent families to help avoid the unnecessary placement of these chldren in foster care. In this new program, student attorneys and student social workers worked witn the grandparent client to help ...


Constitutional Necessity And Presidential Prerogative: Does Presidential Discretion Undergird Or Undermine The Constitution?, Michael P. Van Alstine Jan 2009

Constitutional Necessity And Presidential Prerogative: Does Presidential Discretion Undergird Or Undermine The Constitution?, Michael P. Van Alstine

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Saving Facebook, James Grimmelmann Jan 2009

Saving Facebook, James Grimmelmann

Faculty Scholarship

This Article provides the first comprehensive analysis of the law and policy of privacy on social network sites, using Facebook as its principal example. It explains how Facebook users socialize on the site, why they misunderstand the risks involved, and how their privacy suffers as a result. Facebook offers a socially compelling platform that also facilitates peer-to-peer privacy violations: users harming each others’ privacy interests. These two facts are inextricably linked; people use Facebook with the goal of sharing some information about themselves. Policymakers cannot make Facebook completely safe, but they can help people use it safely.

The Article makes ...


The Ethical Visions Of Copyright Law, James Grimmelmann Jan 2009

The Ethical Visions Of Copyright Law, James Grimmelmann

Faculty Scholarship

This symposium essay explores the imagined ethics of copyright: the ethical stories that people tell to justify, make sense of, and challenge copyright law. Such ethical visions are everywhere in intellectual property discourse, and legal scholarship ought to pay more attention to them. The essay focuses on a deontic vision of reciprocity in the author-audience relationship, a set of linked claims that authors and audiences ought to respect each other and express this respect through voluntary transactions.

Versions of this default ethical vision animate groups as seemingly antagonistic as the music industry, file sharers, free software advocates, and Creative Commons ...


Saving Facebook: A Response To Professor Freiwald, James Grimmelmann Jan 2009

Saving Facebook: A Response To Professor Freiwald, James Grimmelmann

Faculty Scholarship

In this brief response to Professor Susan Freiwald's thoughtful comments on my article "Saving Facebook," I address three of Freiwald’s points, all of which go to the heart of my project. I justify my choice of Facebook, ask when user collective action can sufficiently protect privacy, and emphasize that these privacy issues are genuinely peer-to-peer.


Going Underground: The Ethics Of Advising A Battered Woman Fleeing An Abusive Relationship, Leigh S. Goodmark Jan 2009

Going Underground: The Ethics Of Advising A Battered Woman Fleeing An Abusive Relationship, Leigh S. Goodmark

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Reframing Domestic Violence Law And Policy: An Anti-Essentialist Proposal, Leigh S. Goodmark Jan 2009

Reframing Domestic Violence Law And Policy: An Anti-Essentialist Proposal, Leigh S. Goodmark

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Autonomy Feminism: An Anti-Essentialist Critique Of Mandatory Interventions In Domestic Violence Cases, Leigh S. Goodmark Jan 2009

Autonomy Feminism: An Anti-Essentialist Critique Of Mandatory Interventions In Domestic Violence Cases, Leigh S. Goodmark

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.