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Thinking Like A Source State In A Digital Economy, Yariv Brauner Apr 2021

Thinking Like A Source State In A Digital Economy, Yariv Brauner

UF Law Faculty Publications

This Article proceeds as follows: Part I reviews the traditional U.S. international tax policy, followed by Part II that highlights the impact of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Creation Act of 2017 on such policy. Part III provides context to the proposals made by this Article with a discussion of the international discourse over the challenges that the digital economy presents to the international tax regime, while Part IV exposes and explains the role of the United States in this discourse. Finally, the Article concludes with modest proposals for U.S. action in response to the challenges presented by ...


Populism And Transparency: The Political Core Of An Administrative Norm, Mark Fenster Feb 2021

Populism And Transparency: The Political Core Of An Administrative Norm, Mark Fenster

UF Law Faculty Publications

Transparency has become a preeminent administrative norm with unimpeachable status as a pillar of democracy. But the rise of right-wing populism, reminiscent of older forms of militaristic authoritarianism, threatens transparency’s standing. Recently elected governments in Europe, Latin America, and North America represent a counter-movement away from liberal-democratic institutions that promote the visibility and popular accountability that transparency promises. Contemporary populist movements have not, however, entirely rejected it as an ideal. The populist rebuke of power inequities and its advocacy for popular sovereignty implicitly and sometimes explicitly include a demand for a more visible, accessible state. Populists’ seemingly hypocritical embrace ...


The Discriminatory Executive & The Rule Of Law, Maryam Jamshidi Jan 2021

The Discriminatory Executive & The Rule Of Law, Maryam Jamshidi

UF Law Faculty Publications

Today, the executive enjoys unprecedented power, particularly in the area of national security. By and large, this authority is not meaningfully restrained by Congress or the courts. However, some scholars argue that the presidency is still kept in check by the rule of law and politics. According to this view, substantive and procedural laws and internal executive branch rules combine with political efforts by the public, like voting, to hold the President accountable. This Article challenges this view. It argues that the rule of law and politics do not always work together to restrain the executive. Instead, law can sometimes ...


A 'Public' Journey Through Covid-19: Donald Trump, Twitter, And The Secrecy Of U.S. Presidents’ Health, Mark Fenster Jan 2021

A 'Public' Journey Through Covid-19: Donald Trump, Twitter, And The Secrecy Of U.S. Presidents’ Health, Mark Fenster

UF Law Faculty Publications

Donald Trump ignored numerous governance norms in his one term as U.S. President, especially those that prescribe disclosure of official and personal financial information. His brief period of illness from COVID-19, which he broadcast to the world via his Twitter account, revealed the complexity of Trump’s relationship to the concept and norms of transparency that presume information’s necessity for a functional and accountable state. At the same time that Trump offered little in the way of coherent and authoritative information about his health, he also provided an enormous amount of seemingly “inside” and direct accounts of the ...


A Tale Of Two Formalisms: How Law And Economics Mirrors Originalism And Textualism, Neil H. Buchanan, Michael C. Dorf Jan 2021

A Tale Of Two Formalisms: How Law And Economics Mirrors Originalism And Textualism, Neil H. Buchanan, Michael C. Dorf

UF Law Faculty Publications

Two leading schools of thought among U.S. conservative legal elites — Law and Economics (L&E) and Originalism and Textualism (O&T) — both purport to use their formalist structures to guide analysis in ways that are objective, substantially determinate, and apolitical. Because they rest on very different theoretical underpinnings, L&E and O&T should only randomly reach similar policy or legal conclusions. After all, L&E implements neoclassical economics, a theory of utility maximization, whereas O&T is a theory of semantics. Yet as practiced, L&E and O&T rarely result in conflict. What explains the missing intra-conservative ...


The New Parental Rights, Anne C. Dailey, Laura A. Rosenbury Jan 2021

The New Parental Rights, Anne C. Dailey, Laura A. Rosenbury

UF Law Faculty Publications

This Article sets forth a new model of parental rights designed to free children and families from the ideals of parent–child unity and family privacy that underlie the law’s expansive protection for parental rights. The law currently presumes that parents’ interests coincide with those of their children, creating an illusion of parent–child union that suppresses the very real ways in which children’s interests and identities, even at a young age, may depart from those of their parents. Expansive protection for parental rights also confines children to the private family, ignoring children’s broad range of interests ...


The Status And Legitimacy Of M’Naghten’S Insane Delusion Rule, E. Lea Johnston, Vincent T. Leahy Jan 2021

The Status And Legitimacy Of M’Naghten’S Insane Delusion Rule, E. Lea Johnston, Vincent T. Leahy

UF Law Faculty Publications

This Article investigates jurisdictions’ compliance with M’Naghten’s directive for how to treat delusions in insanity cases and assesses the validity and reasonableness of courts’ application of the law. Most U.S. jurisdictions employ an insanity test roughly modeled on the rule articulated in the 1843 M’Naghten’s Case. This test focuses on a defendant’s inability to know, because of a mental disease, the nature of her act or its wrongfulness. But the M’Naghten judges also issued a second rule — particular to delusions — that has received much less attention. This rule holds that, when the defendant ...


Disclosing Discrimination, Stephanie Bornstein Jan 2021

Disclosing Discrimination, Stephanie Bornstein

UF Law Faculty Publications

In the United States, enforcement of laws prohibiting workplace discrimination rests almost entirely on the shoulders of employee victims, who must first file charges with a government agency and then pursue litigation themselves. While the law forbids retaliation against employees who complain, this does little to prevent it, in part because employees are also responsible for initiating any claims of retaliation they experience as a result of their original discrimination claims. The burden on employees to complain—and their justified fear of retaliation if they do so—results in underenforcement of the law and a failure to spot and redress ...


Transparency And The First, Mark Fenster Jan 2021

Transparency And The First, Mark Fenster

UF Law Faculty Publications

In his book The First: How to Think About Hate Speech, Campus Speech, Religious Speech, Fake News, Post-Truth, and Donald Trump, Stanley Fish neatly reverses the polarity of rights-based claims that the public enjoys, under the First Amendment’s free speech and press rights, a right to government information. Transparency and free speech ideals are indeed related, he concedes, because they share a political vision and conceptual grounding in the notion that robust conceptions of free speech carry a commitment to increase the flow of information. But this is not a good thing, Fish argues—rather, the relationship between the ...


Curing The First Amendment Scrutiny Muddle Through A Breyer-Based Blend Up? Toward A Less Categorical, More Values-Oriented Approach For Selecting Standards Of Judicial Review, Clay Calvert Jan 2021

Curing The First Amendment Scrutiny Muddle Through A Breyer-Based Blend Up? Toward A Less Categorical, More Values-Oriented Approach For Selecting Standards Of Judicial Review, Clay Calvert

UF Law Faculty Publications

This Article argues that the United States Supreme Court should significantly alter its current categorical approach for discerning standards of judicial review in free-speech cases. The present system should become nondeterminative and be augmented with a modified version of Justice Stephen Breyer’s long-preferred proportionality framework. Specifically, the Article’s proposed tack fuses facets of today’s policy, which largely pivots on distinguishing content-based laws from content-neutral laws and letting that categorization determine scrutiny, with a more nuanced, values-and-interests methodology. A values-and-interests formula would allow the Court to climb up or down the traditional ladder of scrutiny rungs – strict, intermediate ...


Rethinking Major League Baseball’S Antitrust Exemption, Roger D. Blair, Wenche Wang Jan 2020

Rethinking Major League Baseball’S Antitrust Exemption, Roger D. Blair, Wenche Wang

UF Law Faculty Publications

For nearly a century, Major League Baseball (MLB) has enjoyed antitrust immunity. No other sports league or organization is similarly exempt. Shielded by precedent from antitrust prosecution, MLB clubs are free to exploit both monopolistic and monopsonistic power. In this paper, we call for a repeal of MLB’s antitrust exemption. In doing so, we examine some recent antitrust challenges to MLB conduct, the current interest of the Department of Justice and the Federal Trade Commission in labor market issues, the welfare consequences of the exemption, and a policy recommendation for legislative action.


Children's Equality: Strategizing A New Deal For Children, Nancy E. Dowd Jan 2020

Children's Equality: Strategizing A New Deal For Children, Nancy E. Dowd

UF Law Faculty Publications

It is the ultimate gift to have one’s work trigger feedback, critique and challenge that expands and deepens the project. Professors Cooper, Huntington, McGinley, Silbaugh, and Woodhouse all have been sources of inspiration for me; their Articles and Essays in response to Reimagining Equality contribute both to my thinking and to the core focus of the book, the well-being, development and equality of all children, but also to the broad focus of this special issue on children and poverty. I am particularly grateful for their challenges and critiques, and their shared focus on the strategies I explore in the ...


Artificial Intelligence And Climate Change, Amy L. Stein Jan 2020

Artificial Intelligence And Climate Change, Amy L. Stein

UF Law Faculty Publications

As artificial intelligence (AI) continues to embed itself in our daily lives, many focus on the threats it poses to privacy, security, due process, and democracy itself. But beyond these legitimate concerns, AI promises to optimize activities, increase efficiency, and enhance the accuracy and efficacy of the many aspects of society relying on predictions and likelihoods. In short, its most promising applications may come, not from uses affecting civil liberties and the social fabric of our society, but from those particularly complex technical problems lying beyond our ready human capacity. Climate change is one such complex problem, requiring fundamental changes ...


The Rise And (Potential) Fall Of U.S. Cartel Enforcement, Vivek Ghosal, D. Daniel Sokol Jan 2020

The Rise And (Potential) Fall Of U.S. Cartel Enforcement, Vivek Ghosal, D. Daniel Sokol

UF Law Faculty Publications

Government enforcement against collusion, now viewed by the Supreme Court as the “supreme evil” in antitrust, has gone through various phases of enforcement in the United States. There have been periods in which cartels have been able to collude more or less effectively given various institutional tools at the disposal of the government. By analyzing enforcement and prosecutions data over a long time horizon, 1969–2016, this Article examines the attributes of cartel enforcement over time and the changing use of tools to assist with detection and punishment. We provide a comprehensive description of critical cartel enforcement events and institutional ...


Is Solitary Confinement A Punishment?, John F. Stinneford Jan 2020

Is Solitary Confinement A Punishment?, John F. Stinneford

UF Law Faculty Publications

The United States Constitution imposes a variety of constraints on the imposition of punishment, including the requirements that the punishment be authorized by a preexisting penal statute and ordered by a lawful judicial sentence. Today, prison administrators impose solitary confinement on thousands of prisoners despite the fact that neither of these requirements has been met. Is this imposition a “punishment without law,” or is it a mere exercise of administrative discretion? In an 1890 case called In re Medley, the Supreme Court held that solitary confinement is a separate punishment subject to constitutional restraints, but it has ignored this holding ...


What Happened To Grandma’S House: The Real Property Implications Of Dying Intestate, Danaya C. Wright Jan 2020

What Happened To Grandma’S House: The Real Property Implications Of Dying Intestate, Danaya C. Wright

UF Law Faculty Publications

Studies have shown that intergenerational wealth transmission significantly affects wealth concentration and the growing wealth gap. Of the two million households that received an inheritance or a substantial inter vivos gift each year, roughly half are small, under $50,000, while transfers of $1 million or more account for only 2% of the transfers. Yet, those 2% of inheritances over $1 million comprise 40% of total wealth transferred. As scholars continue to examine the role of inheritance in the alarming wealth gap, few are focusing on how the laws of intestacy might exacerbate the gap by leading to greater wealth ...


The Ncaa’S Transfer Rules: An Antitrust Analysis, Roger D. Blair, Wenche Wang Jan 2020

The Ncaa’S Transfer Rules: An Antitrust Analysis, Roger D. Blair, Wenche Wang

UF Law Faculty Publications

In Deppe v. National Collegiate Athletic Association, the Seventh Circuit accepted the NCAA’s argument that its transfer rules are presumptively procompetitive. It also approved the NCAA’s no-poaching agreement. This Article analyzes these NCAA-imposed restraints and finds them inconsistent with current antitrust policy.


Finding Balance, Forging A Legacy: Harassers’ Rights And Employer Best Practices In The Era Of Metoo, Rachel Arnow-Richman Jan 2020

Finding Balance, Forging A Legacy: Harassers’ Rights And Employer Best Practices In The Era Of Metoo, Rachel Arnow-Richman

UF Law Faculty Publications

This article, prepared for the Annual Jack Pemberton Lecture on Workplace Justice, calls for the development of best practices for handling accused harassers in response to the MeToo movement. It contends that much of MeToo’s legacy will be determined by the voluntary choices of employers as they implement new policies and practices surrounding sexual harassment. It is therefore crucial that employers gain a better understanding of the nature and scope of sexual harassment and the risks of both over- and under-enforcement of anti-harassment norms. Through analysis of Harvey Weinstein’s final contract as Co-Chairman of the Weinstein Companies, the ...


Contracting For Confidential Discovery, Seth Katsuya Endo Jan 2020

Contracting For Confidential Discovery, Seth Katsuya Endo

UF Law Faculty Publications

One way that courts have adapted to the age of the internet is to provide nearly instant online access to their dockets. But many important filings remain shielded from public view as courts regularly issue stipulated protective orders at the request of the parties. And, while the costs and benefits of confidential discovery have been extensively discussed in the academic literature, several important contextual developments — including the continuing growth of electronically stored information — prompt a reexamination. Additionally, easily searchable federal dockets now provide a window into what is happening in actual practice.

Taking up this task, Contracting for Confidential Discovery ...


The Soul Savers: A 21st Century Homage To Derrick Bell’S Space Traders Or Should Black People Leave America?, Katheryn Russell-Brown Jan 2020

The Soul Savers: A 21st Century Homage To Derrick Bell’S Space Traders Or Should Black People Leave America?, Katheryn Russell-Brown

UF Law Faculty Publications

Narrative storytelling is a staple of legal jurisprudence. The Case of the Speluncean Explorers by Lon Fuller and The Space Traders by Derrick Bell are two of the most well-known and celebrated legal stories. The Soul Savers parable that follows pays tribute to Professor Bell’s prescient, apocalyptic racial tale. Professor Bell, a founding member of Critical Race Theory, wrote The Space Traders to instigate discussions about America’s deeply rooted entanglements with race and racism. The Soul Savers is offered as an attempt to follow in Professor Bell’s narrative footsteps by raising and pondering new and old frameworks ...


Regulate Physician Restrictive Covenants To Improve Healthcare, Judy Ann Clausen Jan 2020

Regulate Physician Restrictive Covenants To Improve Healthcare, Judy Ann Clausen

UF Law Faculty Publications

The U.S. healthcare reform agenda seeks to expand patient choice and access, improve quality, and control costs. This Article argues these goals should govern enforceability of physician non-compete and non-solicitation agreements (restrictive covenants). Most jurisdictions apply a reasonableness test to assess the enforceability of physician restrictive covenants. Some jurisdictions hold physician non-competes per se invalid. Courts applying the reasonableness test often disrupt continuity of care and harm patients; continuity of care is key to patient health. Moreover, physicians departing a practice have an ethical obligation to notify patients of the physician's departure and how to transfer to the ...


Integrative Environmental Law: A Prescription For Law In The Time Of Climate Change, Alyson C. Flournoy Jan 2020

Integrative Environmental Law: A Prescription For Law In The Time Of Climate Change, Alyson C. Flournoy

UF Law Faculty Publications

As the magnitude of the threat posed by climate change has become increasingly apparent, scholars and practitioners have begun a dialogue about how to reform environmental law to meet the challenge. Concepts like adaptive management, sustainability, and resilience have emerged in succession, as policy makers and scholars search for new moorings for our ethical and legal framework. While useful, these concepts have failed to provide a vision, goal, or solid ethical grounding for environmental law in the era of climate change. This project takes a new approach by exploring what we can learn from the field of Integrative Medicine. The ...


Escaping Doctrinal Lockboxes In First Amendment Jurisprudence: Workarounds For Strict Scrutiny For Low-Value Speech In The Face Of Stevens And Reed, Clay Calvert Jan 2020

Escaping Doctrinal Lockboxes In First Amendment Jurisprudence: Workarounds For Strict Scrutiny For Low-Value Speech In The Face Of Stevens And Reed, Clay Calvert

UF Law Faculty Publications

The United States Supreme Court’s 2010 opinion in the crush-video case of United States v. Stevens made it extremely difficult to declare new varieties of low-value speech unprotected by the First Amendment. Five years later, the Court’s sign-ordinance ruling in Reed v. Town of Gilbert made it exceedingly tough for facially content-based regulations imposed on presumptively protected speech to be analyzed by any standard of judicial review less rigorous than the demanding strict scrutiny test. This Article examines how some courts today, despite being hemmed in by the strictures of both Stevens and Reed, are creatively unearthing novel ...


Troll Storms And Tort Liability For Speech Urging Action By Others: A First Amendment Analysis And An Initial Step Toward A Federal Rule, Clay Calvert Jan 2020

Troll Storms And Tort Liability For Speech Urging Action By Others: A First Amendment Analysis And An Initial Step Toward A Federal Rule, Clay Calvert

UF Law Faculty Publications

This Commentary examines when, consistent with First Amendment principles of free expression, speakers can be held tortiously responsible for the actions of others with whom they have no contractual or employer-employee relationship. It argues that recent lawsuits against Daily Stormer publisher Andrew Anglin for sparking “troll storms” provide a timely analytical springboard into the issue of vicarious tort liability. Furthermore, such liability is particularly problematic when a speaker’s message urging action does not fall into an unprotected category of expression, such as incitement or true threats, and thus, were it not for tort law, would be fully protected. In ...


Judging And Baseball, Merritt E. Mcalister Jan 2020

Judging And Baseball, Merritt E. Mcalister

UF Law Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Ebay, Permanent Injunctions, And Trade Secrets, Elizabeth A. Rowe Jan 2020

Ebay, Permanent Injunctions, And Trade Secrets, Elizabeth A. Rowe

UF Law Faculty Publications

This Article presents the first qualitative empirical review of permanent injunctions in trade secret cases. In addition, it explores the extent to which the Supreme Court’s patent decision in eBay v. MercExchange has influenced the analysis of equitable principles in federal trade secret litigation. Among the more notable findings are that while equitable principles are generally applied in determining whether to grant a permanent injunction to a prevailing party after trial, the courts are not necessarily strictly applying the four factors from eBay. The award of monetary relief does not preclude equitable injunctive relief, and courts can find irreparable ...


The Digital Challenge To International Trade Law, Wentong Zheng Jan 2020

The Digital Challenge To International Trade Law, Wentong Zheng

UF Law Faculty Publications

The rise of the Internet and so-called digital trade has significantly transformed international trade. International trade law, however, has lagged behind in regulating the phenomenon. Decades-long negotiations at the World Trade Organization (WTO) over digital trade have largely stalled, while efforts to deal with the issue at the bilateral and regional levels have resulted in inconsistent and fragmented rules. This article discusses the challenges posed by digital trade to international trade law and the best ways to meet those challenges. It contributes to the discourse on digital trade by advocating for a back-to-basics approach. It argues that instead of undertaking ...


Children’S Equality Rights: Every Child’S Right To Develop To Their Full Capacity, Nancy E. Dowd Jan 2020

Children’S Equality Rights: Every Child’S Right To Develop To Their Full Capacity, Nancy E. Dowd

UF Law Faculty Publications

Children are born equal. Yet as early as eighteen months, hierarchies emerge among children. These hierarchies are not random but fall into patterns by race, gender and class. They are not caused nor voluntarily chosen by children or their parents. The hierarchies grow, persist, and are made worse by systems and policies created by the state, perpetuating the position of the privileged and continuing the disadvantage of the subordinated. Children’s equal right to develop to their capacity is severely undermined by policies and structures that hamper and block the development of some by creating barriers and challenges or failing ...


Minding The Gaps In Regulation Of Do-It-Yourself Biotechnology, Barbara J. Evans Jan 2020

Minding The Gaps In Regulation Of Do-It-Yourself Biotechnology, Barbara J. Evans

UF Law Faculty Publications

This Symposium confronts the reality that genetic technologies – not just genetic tests, but tools for altering plant, animal, and human genomes – are rapidly becoming and indeed already are consumer technologies. People can experiment with and apply these technologies in disintermediated formats, potentially without the involvement of national research funding agencies, professional scientists, physicians, genetic counselors, regulators, and traditional medical product manufacturers. The framework of 20th -century medical product and practice regulations assigned each of these parties a role in promoting ethical, safe, and effective biomedical research and health care. Do-it-yourself biotechnology (DIYbio), which includes direct-to-consumer (DTC) and do-it-yourself (DIY) genomic ...


After Forty Years Of Antitrust Revision And Apple V. Pepper, What Now Illinois Brick?, Jeffrey L. Harrison Jan 2020

After Forty Years Of Antitrust Revision And Apple V. Pepper, What Now Illinois Brick?, Jeffrey L. Harrison

UF Law Faculty Publications

Nineteen seventy-seven was a paradigm-shifting year in antitrust law. Decisions by the Supreme Court greatly limited the type of parties who could successfully bring antitrust actions and what types of activities would violate the antitrust laws. First, in January of that year, the Court, in Brunswick v. Pueblo Bowl-O-Mat, ruled that to mount a case the plaintiff had to have suffered an antitrust injury. In other words, even if the antitrust laws were violated, the party raising the issue had to have suffered the type of harm the laws were designed to avoid. Then in a fourteen day span the ...