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Full-Text Articles in Law

Constitutional Restraints On Intrastate Distribution Of Taxing Authority, Walter Hellerstein Feb 2024

Constitutional Restraints On Intrastate Distribution Of Taxing Authority, Walter Hellerstein

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No abstract provided.


Against Bankruptcy: Public Litigation Values Versus The Endless Quest For Global Peace In Mass Litigation, Abbe Gluck, Elizabeth Chamblee Burch, Adam Zimmerman Feb 2024

Against Bankruptcy: Public Litigation Values Versus The Endless Quest For Global Peace In Mass Litigation, Abbe Gluck, Elizabeth Chamblee Burch, Adam Zimmerman

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Can bankruptcy court solve a public health crisis? Should the goal of “global peace” in complex lawsuits trump traditional litigation values in a system grounded in public participation and jurisdictional redundancy? How much leeway do courts have to innovate civil procedure?

These questions have finally reached the Supreme Court in Harrington v. Purdue Pharma L.P., the $6 billion bankruptcy that purports to achieve global resolution of all current and future opioids suits against the company and its former family owners, the Sacklers. The case provides a critical opportunity to reflect on what is lost when parties in mass torts find …


Blue Carbon, Red States, And Paris Agreement Article 6, Adam D. Orford Feb 2024

Blue Carbon, Red States, And Paris Agreement Article 6, Adam D. Orford

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Coastal U.S. states, including many that have opposed proactive U.S. climate policies, are contemplating entrance into the supply side of the international carbon credit markets by, among other things, hosting revenue-generating blue carbon projects on their submerged lands. The voluntary carbon credit markets already facilitate private investment in such activities, and the emerging Paris Agreement Article 6 framework is poised to generate investment interest at the national level as well. Reviewing these trends, this Perspective questions whether this is good climate, environmental, and social policy, and advises further oversight and accountability.


Green Amendments Land Use And Transportation: What Could Go Wrong?, Michael Lewyn Jan 2024

Green Amendments Land Use And Transportation: What Could Go Wrong?, Michael Lewyn

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Numerous states have amended their constitutions to include a green amendment (that is, an amendment providing that the state's citizens have a right to a healthy environment). Unfortunately, the vagueness of these amendments leaves an enormous amount of interpretative power to courts. This article examines how some courts have interpreted green amendments and how these interpretations risk the misuse of green amendments. Additionally, this article examines how such misuse may be avoided.


Challenging The Criminalization Of Undocumented Drivers Through A Health-Justice Framework, Jason A. Cade Jan 2024

Challenging The Criminalization Of Undocumented Drivers Through A Health-Justice Framework, Jason A. Cade

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States increasingly use driver’s license laws to further policy objectives unrelated to road safety. This symposium contribution employs a health justice lens to focus on one manifestation of this trend—state schemes that prohibit noncitizen residents from accessing driver’s licenses and then impose criminal sanctions for driving without authorization. Status-based no-license laws not only facilitate legally questionable enforcement of local immigration priorities but also impose structural inequities with long-term health consequences for immigrants and their family members, including US citizen children. Safe, reliable transportation is a significant social determinant of health for individuals, families, and communities. Applying a health justice lens …


Interpreting Ethics Rules, Samuel J. Levine Jan 2024

Interpreting Ethics Rules, Samuel J. Levine

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This Article explores the interpretation of ethics rules through the prism of two rules that have been the subject of ongoing controversy and contention: Rule 4.2, the “no-contact” rule, which prohibits a lawyer from communicating with a represented client absent the consent of that client’s lawyer, and Rule 8.4(g), which prohibits various forms of discrimination and harassment. Each of these rules provides a model for a wider examination of different interpretive approaches to ethics rules, grounded in different attitudes toward the features and functions of ethics codes. Specifically, the debate revolving around Rule 4.2 illustrates competing approaches to interpreting a …


Do Americans Support More Housing?, Michael Lewyn Jan 2024

Do Americans Support More Housing?, Michael Lewyn

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An analysis of opinion poll data on housing issues. The article finds that Americans generally believe that their community needs more housing of all types, but are more closely divided about whether such housing should be in their own neighborhoods. The article further finds that members of minority groups, lower-income Americans, and younger Americans are more pro-housing than older, affluent whites.


Is Now A(Nother) Teachable Moment Honoring The Memory Of Dr. William S. Spriggs, Francine J. Lipman Jan 2024

Is Now A(Nother) Teachable Moment Honoring The Memory Of Dr. William S. Spriggs, Francine J. Lipman

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No abstract provided.


When Commanders Decide: Military Prosecutorial Decision-Making In Sexual Assault Cases, Chris Cox Jan 2024

When Commanders Decide: Military Prosecutorial Decision-Making In Sexual Assault Cases, Chris Cox

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Congress enacted legislation that went into effect in 2023, which transferred prosecutorial decision-making for serious cases, including sexual assault, from Commanders to military lawyers. While there is some research on the military’s criminal justice system that supports shifting the decision-making to military lawyers, there is a large body of research that suggests lawyers, too, suffer from similar impediments when handling decision-making for sexual assault cases. In the wake of this new amendment, it is important to continue assessing how the change will impact case processing, by first clearly understanding what was happening when Commanders had complete authority. This article explores …


The Constitutional Meaning Of Financial Terms, Tomer S. Stein, Shelby Ponton Jan 2024

The Constitutional Meaning Of Financial Terms, Tomer S. Stein, Shelby Ponton

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The Constitution has sixty-three financial terms. These financial terms include, for instance, “compensation,” “expenditures,” “debt,” “coin,” “revenue,” “securities,” and “bankruptcies”—all of which determine the elementary building blocks of our governmental makeup. When the Supreme Court interprets the meaning of these financial terms, it does so in isolation and without a consistent framework. This Article proposes a unified framework for the interpretation of financial terms in the Constitution, comprising of two fundamental canons of construction.

First, this Article proposes that all financial terms in the Constitution should be interpreted with fiscal and monetary neutrality—interpreting financial terms in a way that does …


Judicial Review In Public And Private Governance, Tomer S. Stein Jan 2024

Judicial Review In Public And Private Governance, Tomer S. Stein

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In Students for Fair Admissions, Inc. v. President and Fellows of Harvard College, the Supreme Court limited judicial deference to universities. In West Virginia v. EPA, the Court reduced deference to administrative agencies. In Coster v. UIP Cos., Inc., the Delaware Supreme Court narrowed deference to boards of directors, proclaimed a new standard of judicial review, and then seemingly retracted it. Common to these constitutional, administrative, and corporate law cases is unpredictability, uncertainty, and incoherence in the use and application of substantive standards of review. The resulting disarray is explicitly acknowledged by the very judges that formulate these standards of …


The Futures Of Law, Lawyers, And Law Schools: A Dialogue, Benjamin H. Barton, Sameer M. Ashar, Michael J. Madison, Rachel F. Moran Jan 2024

The Futures Of Law, Lawyers, And Law Schools: A Dialogue, Benjamin H. Barton, Sameer M. Ashar, Michael J. Madison, Rachel F. Moran

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On April 19 and 20, 2023, Professors Bernard Hibbitts and Richard Weisberg convened a conference at the University of Pittsburgh School of Law titled “Disarmed, Distracted, Disconnected, and Distressed: Modern Legal Education and the Unmaking of American Lawyers.” Four speakers concluded the event with a spirited conversation about themes expressed during the proceedings. Distilling a lively two days, they asked: what are the most critical challenges now facing US legal education and, by extension, lawyers and the communities they serve? Their agreements and disagreements were striking, so much so that Professors Hibbitts and Weisberg invited those four to extend their …


Review Of Teri Mcmurtry-Chubb, Race Unequals: Overseer Contracts, White Masculinities, And The Formation Of Managerial Identity In The Plantation Economy (Lexington Books, 2021), Lucille A. Jewel Jan 2024

Review Of Teri Mcmurtry-Chubb, Race Unequals: Overseer Contracts, White Masculinities, And The Formation Of Managerial Identity In The Plantation Economy (Lexington Books, 2021), Lucille A. Jewel

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In academic studies of the southern plantation, the overseer is often portrayed in simple terms as a lower-class white male who did not himself own land or enslaved persons. Departing from these one-dimensional descriptions, McMurtry-Chubb illustrates the plantation overseer in a much more granular way. In this lucid and engaging monograph, she shows how public and private law helped construct the overseer’s masculine identity in a way that both elevated the social status of elite planter males, and lowered the status of the enslaved people the overseer managed. The overseer’s performance of masculinity was assigned a value (lower than the …


The Case For (And Against) Aba Regulation Of Non-J.D. Programs, Benjamin H. Barton Jan 2024

The Case For (And Against) Aba Regulation Of Non-J.D. Programs, Benjamin H. Barton

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American law schools have pulled out of what looked like a death spiral. From 2008-18 job placement and bar passage cratered and applications and JD enrolment followed. Some law schools found themselves trapped between Scylla and Charybdis – if they did not loosen admissions, they would not have the funds to keep the doors open. But if they loosened admissions too much bar passage and placement suffered, prompting a possible closure via disaccreditation by the ABA (or the DOE).

There are (broadly speaking) two models of profitable higher education in the United States. The first is the old school, classic …


What The Roys Should Learn From The Demoulas Family (But Probably Won’T), Joan Macleod Heminway Jan 2024

What The Roys Should Learn From The Demoulas Family (But Probably Won’T), Joan Macleod Heminway

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This essay offers a comparison of the actions taken by members of two families: the Demoulas family, best known as owner-operators of northeastern regional supermarkets, and the Roy family featured in HBO's series "Succession." The comparative appraisal focuses principally on the selfish pursuit of individualized financial, social, and familial status by key members of both the Demoulas and Roy families as they relate to the law of business associations (principally corporate law). At the heart of the matter is the legal concept of fiduciary duty. A comparison of the two families’ exploits reveals that lessons earlier learned by the Demoulas …


Patients Versus Profits, Isaac ("Zack") D. Buck Jan 2024

Patients Versus Profits, Isaac ("Zack") D. Buck

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Private equity (PE) has come to health care. With it: layoffs, cuts, and new pressures for providers, higher prices for payers, and questions from patients about quality and excessive care. PE firms, driven solely by a profit motive, take over health care entities, “lean” them down, load them with debt, and hope to extract a profit for their investors when they sell the hospital, physician group, or nursing home. Their entry into health care has been stealthy but dramatic: upwards of a third of all for-profit hospitals in the United States, and 40 percent of America’s emergency rooms, are now …


Brief Of Law And Business Professors As Amici Curiae In Support Of Respondents, Macquarie Infrastructure V. Moab Partners, No. 22-1165, Dec. 20, 2023, Joan Macleod Heminway, J. Robert Brown, James D. Cox, Sarah C. Haan, Faith Stevelman Jan 2024

Brief Of Law And Business Professors As Amici Curiae In Support Of Respondents, Macquarie Infrastructure V. Moab Partners, No. 22-1165, Dec. 20, 2023, Joan Macleod Heminway, J. Robert Brown, James D. Cox, Sarah C. Haan, Faith Stevelman

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Omissions of disclosure required by the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC or Commission) in Item 303 of Regulation S-K can be a basis for an action under Section 10(b) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (Exchange Act). Disclosures mandated by the SEC in periodic reports are not optional. That these obligations can create a “duty” to disclose under Rule 10b-5(b) is consistent with congressional intent, state court opinions, the common law, and with the longstanding understanding of the federal securities laws (including those of legal scholars and the SEC). This case does not, therefore, seek to “impermissibly expand” the …


Justifying Aggression: Russia's 2020 Constitutional Amendments And The Invasion Of Ukraine, Robert C. Blitt Jan 2024

Justifying Aggression: Russia's 2020 Constitutional Amendments And The Invasion Of Ukraine, Robert C. Blitt

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Beyond the alluring promise of an enhanced social safety net for Russian citizens, President Vladimir Putin's constitutional amendments of 2020 betrayed a distinct preoccupation with fortifying Russia's international standing and crafting a new national identity. By Putin's own account, these amendments were necessary to steel the country against the malevolent action of international conspirators committed to Russia's downfall. As this Article posits, these specific constitutional changes systematically entrenched an exceptionalist vision of Russian sovereignty and a civilizational identity that left the country constitutionally untethered from international norms and institutions, saturated in religious fervor and visions of imperial glory, and poised …


Child Sacrifices: The Precarity Of Minors’ Autonomy And Bodily Integrity After Dobbs, Teri Dobbins Baxter Jan 2024

Child Sacrifices: The Precarity Of Minors’ Autonomy And Bodily Integrity After Dobbs, Teri Dobbins Baxter

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In Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization, the Supreme Court held that there is no constitutional right to abortion. The decision has had a devastating impact on people seeking abortions in many states, and it will have an even more profound effect on the rights and lives of minors. Pregnant minors face greater risks than pregnant adults when they are forced to continue a pregnancy that can harm their physical and mental health and their educational and financial futures. Very young minors are incapable of consenting to the sexual acts that result in pregnancy, but many states require even these …


Innovation Misunderstood, Maurice E. Stucke, Ariel Ezrachi Jan 2024

Innovation Misunderstood, Maurice E. Stucke, Ariel Ezrachi

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Innovation is transformative and key to future prosperity. It is therefore of no surprise that antitrust laws seek to promote it. What is surprising, however, is that despite the central role that innovation occupies in competition cases, its actual treatment by the courts is far from nuanced.

In this paper, we reflect on the D.C. Circuit’s 2023 ruling in N.Y. v Meta to illustrate the prevailing monocular vision adopted by the court in its treatment of innovation. That vision, we argue, reflects simplistic assumptions as to innovation dynamics and mistaken beliefs about the digital economy. It is further compounded by …


Aba Standard 303(C) And Divisive Concepts Legislation And Policies: Challenges And Opportunities, Sherley Cruz, Becky L. Jacobs, Karen L. Tokarz, Kendall Kerew, Andrew King-Ries, Carwina Weng Jan 2024

Aba Standard 303(C) And Divisive Concepts Legislation And Policies: Challenges And Opportunities, Sherley Cruz, Becky L. Jacobs, Karen L. Tokarz, Kendall Kerew, Andrew King-Ries, Carwina Weng

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This article by six clinicians discusses the challenges and opportunities of new ABA Standard 303 (c), including the implications of and interactions between Standard 303(c) and “divisive concepts” laws and other threats to representation, academic freedom, and free speech in legal education. The article also highlights the intersection of Standard 303(c) and Standard 303(b)(3), which addresses professional identity formation; discusses opportunities to adapt current curriculum and teaching and create new curricular responses to meet the new accreditation standards and interpretations; and explores ways to resist increasing limitations and find a supportive academic community to sustain hope and resilience.


An Upward Trend In Jailhouse Cooperation With Ice: A Report On Detainers Issued By Ice And 287(G) Agreements In Alabama, Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, And Tennessee From 2016 To 2020., Eric Franklin Amarante, Project South Jan 2024

An Upward Trend In Jailhouse Cooperation With Ice: A Report On Detainers Issued By Ice And 287(G) Agreements In Alabama, Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, And Tennessee From 2016 To 2020., Eric Franklin Amarante, Project South

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This report analyzes information received in response to Freedom of Information Act requests to ICE about 287(g) agreements and detainer requests issued between fiscal year 2016 to 2020 in those states. This report concludes with specific recommendations for local, state, and federal governments to end LLE-ICE collaboration and repeal anti-immigrant policies.


Religious Accommodations In The Dobbs Era, Ann C. Mcginley Jan 2024

Religious Accommodations In The Dobbs Era, Ann C. Mcginley

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Given the deep political divide in the U.S. and the emotional response to the abortion issue, workplaces may become hostile environments that harm workers based on their pro- or anti-abortion views or their out-of-work activism. Besides hostile environments, some workers may suffer workplace discipline based on their speech at work or refusals to engage in certain job requirements. Disciplining employees for engaging in workplace speech or refusal to perform parts of their jobs may violate workers’ rights under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which requires that employers grant religious accommodations in the workplace if doing so …


Nextgen Licensure & Accreditation, Nachman Gutowski Jan 2024

Nextgen Licensure & Accreditation, Nachman Gutowski

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No abstract provided.


Blue Carbon Law, Adam D. Orford Jan 2024

Blue Carbon Law, Adam D. Orford

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This Article explores the emerging law of blue carbon, defined as rules governing human interventions into Earth’s marine carbon cycles. Blue carbon law is of growing importance today as pressure mounts to incorporate coastal conservation and restoration activities into market-based carbon sequestration schemes, and as the planet’s deep oceans are evaluated for their carbon sequestration potential. The Article conceptualizes two broad trends in blue carbon law: the international law of carbon credit markets creating incentives to commodify and monetize blue carbon resources; and the responsive integration of commodification concepts into existing laws that already manage and influence blue carbon systems. …


The Right To Trial By Jury Shall Remain Inviolate: Jury Trials In Civil Actions In Georgia’S Courts, David E. Shipley Jan 2024

The Right To Trial By Jury Shall Remain Inviolate: Jury Trials In Civil Actions In Georgia’S Courts, David E. Shipley

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Trials, though rare, “shape almost every aspect of procedure,” and the jury trial is a distinctive feature of civil litigation in the United States. The Seventh Amendment of the U.S. Constitution ‘preserves’ the right to jury trial “[i]n suits at common law, where the value in controversy shall exceed twenty dollars.” Even though this amendment does not apply to the states, courts in the states “honor the right to the extent it is created in their constitutions or local statutes.”

The Georgia Constitution provides that “[t]he right to trial by jury shall remain inviolate,” and Georgia’s appellate courts have shown …


Chevron And Stare Decisis, Kent H. Barnett, Christopher J. Walker Jan 2024

Chevron And Stare Decisis, Kent H. Barnett, Christopher J. Walker

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In our contribution to this Chevron on Trial Symposium, we argue that the Supreme Court should not overrule Chevron in Loper Bright Enterprises v. Raimondo and its companion case Relentless v. Department of Commerce. We based our argument largely on statutory stare decisis. In particular, Chevron deference is a bedrock precedent in administrative law, relied on by the Supreme Court and the lower federal courts thousands of times since Chevron was decided in 1984. Congress, federal agencies, and the regulated public have also structured their affairs around the precedent. Conversely, the constitutional arguments against Chevron are unpersuasive, and the debate …


Judicial Threats To Olmstead And The Americans With Disabilities Act, Jean Mangan, Andrea L. Dennis Dec 2023

Judicial Threats To Olmstead And The Americans With Disabilities Act, Jean Mangan, Andrea L. Dennis

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The authors examine the U.S. Supreme Court decision in Olmstead v L.C. ex rel. Zimring and related Supreme Court rulings that could raise questions about the Americans With Disabilities Act's guarantee of care in integrated settings and about which governmental entity's interpretation should be respected when deciding whether a state has met its integration obligation. After reviewing statutes, administrative regulations, and judicial decisions, the authors conclude that Olmstead's integration mandate will likely stand, but actions should be taken to codify the rule in federal and state statutes so that governmental agencies will continue to have the authority to ensure compliance …


Jurisdiction Beyond Our Borders: United States V. Alcoa And The Extraterritorial Reach Of American Antitrust, 1909–1945, Laura Phillips Sawyer Nov 2023

Jurisdiction Beyond Our Borders: United States V. Alcoa And The Extraterritorial Reach Of American Antitrust, 1909–1945, Laura Phillips Sawyer

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Chapter in the book Antimonopoly and American Democracy by Daniel A. Crane and William J. Novak, eds., Oxford University Press, 2023.

In 1945, Judge Learned Hand wrote one of the most influential opinions in modern antitrust law. In declaring that the Aluminum Company of America (Alcoa) had illegally monopolized the industry for virgin aluminum and had participated in an illegal international cartel, Hand both revived and extended American antitrust law. The ruling is famous for several reasons: it narrowly defined the relevant market in favor of the government; it expanded the category of impermissible dominant firm conduct; it interpreted congressional …


Challenges And Rewards Of Educating First Generation Law Students, Lori D. Johnson Oct 2023

Challenges And Rewards Of Educating First Generation Law Students, Lori D. Johnson

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No abstract provided.