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Antitrust Class Actions In The Wake Of Procedural Reform, Christine P. Bartholomew Oct 2022

Antitrust Class Actions In The Wake Of Procedural Reform, Christine P. Bartholomew

Indiana Law Journal

What is the current vitality of antitrust enforcement? Antitrust class actions—the primary mode of competition oversight—has weathered two decades of procedural reform. This Article documents the effects of those reforms. Relying on an original dataset of over 1300 antitrust class action settlements, this Article finds such cases alive but far from well. Certain suits do succeed on an impressive scale, returning billions of dollars to victims. But class action reform has made antitrust enforcement narrower, more time-consuming, and costlier than only a decade ago. And, as this Article’s sources reveal, new battle lines are forming. Across the political spectrum, people …


Tort Law Implications Of Compelled Physician Speech, Nadia N. Sawicki Jul 2022

Tort Law Implications Of Compelled Physician Speech, Nadia N. Sawicki

Indiana Law Journal

Abortion-specific informed consent laws in many states compel physicians to communicate state-mandated information that is arguably inaccurate, immaterial, and inconsistent with their professional obligations. These laws face ongoing First Amendment challenges as violations of the constitutional right against compelled speech. This Article argues that laws compelling physician speech also pose significant problems that should concern scholars of tort law.

State laws that impose tort liability on physicians who refuse to communicate a state-mandated message often do so by deviating from foundational principles of tort law. Not only do they change the substantive disclosure duties of physicians under informed consent law, …


The Limits Of Regulation By Insurance, Kenneth S. Abraham, Daniel Benjamin Schwarcz Jan 2022

The Limits Of Regulation By Insurance, Kenneth S. Abraham, Daniel Benjamin Schwarcz

Indiana Law Journal

Insurance is an enormously powerful and beneficial method of spreading risk and compensating for loss. But even insurance has its limits. A new and misleading aspiration for insurance—that it also can and often does substitute for or significantly complement health and safety regulation—is increasingly in vogue. This vision starts from the uncontroversial recognition that insurers typically adopt measures designed to counteract “moral hazard,” the tendency of insurance to blunt policyholders’ incentives to take care. But proponents of this vision go on to contend that the risk-reducing potential of insurance is significantly more extensive than is traditionally imagined, because insurers are …


The Settlement Trap, Lindsey Simon Apr 2021

The Settlement Trap, Lindsey Simon

Indiana Law Journal

Mass tort victims often wait years for resolution of their personal injury claims, but many who successfully navigate this arduous process will not receive a single dollar of their settlement award. According to applicable bankruptcy and state law, settlement payments may be an asset of the estate that the trustee, exercising its significant authority, administers and distributes to creditors instead of a claimant who had filed for bankruptcy. This distribution power maximizes repayment, a critical counterbalance to the robust protections and benefits that debtors receive in bankruptcy.

Setting aside the perceived unfairness of taking desperately needed money from tort victims, …


The Constitutional Tort System, Noah Smith-Drelich Jan 2021

The Constitutional Tort System, Noah Smith-Drelich

Indiana Law Journal

Constitutional torts—private lawsuits for constitutional wrongdoing—are the primary means by which violations of the U.S. Constitution are vindicated and deterred. Through damage awards, and occasionally injunctive relief, victims of constitutional violations discourage future misconduct while obtaining redress. However, the collection of laws that governs these actions is a complete muddle, lacking any sort of coherent structure or unifying theory. The result is too much and too little constitutional litigation, generating calls for reform from across the political spectrum along with reverberations that reach from Standing Rock to Flint to Ferguson.

This Article constructs a framework of the constitutional tort system, …


Patent Accidents: Questioning Strict Liability In Patent Law, Patrick R. Goold Oct 2020

Patent Accidents: Questioning Strict Liability In Patent Law, Patrick R. Goold

Indiana Law Journal

Accidental infringement of patent rights is a pervasive and growing problem in the Information Age. As IP rights proliferate and expand in scope, it is becoming increasingly easy for companies and individuals to inadvertently infringe patents. When such accidental infringement occurs, patent law holds the infringer strictly liable. This contrasts with many areas of tort law where defendants are only liable if they act negligently.

This Article questions the normative desirability of strict liability in patent law. Assuming the primary value of patent law is utilitarian, this Article poses the research question: what liability rule will maximize social welfare? This …


Maximizing The Value Of America’S Newest Resource, Low- Altitude Airspace: An Economic Analysis Of Aerial Trespass And Drones, Tyler Watson Oct 2020

Maximizing The Value Of America’S Newest Resource, Low- Altitude Airspace: An Economic Analysis Of Aerial Trespass And Drones, Tyler Watson

Indiana Law Journal

Recognizing that tort law is a unique area of law that was judicially created by rational human beings with an innate sense of economic justice, this Note seeks to apply positive economic theory—derived from ex post analyses of tort cases—to an ex ante analysis to predict how and to what extent the existing and proposed aerial trespass rules will further economic efficiency in the context of drones and airspace rights. Part I will provide (1) an overview of the Federal Aviation Administration’s (FAA) current regulatory framework and the development of the common law aerial trespass doctrine and (2) an overview …


A Corporate Duty To Rescue: Biopharmaceutical Companies And Access To Medications, Rebecca E. Wolitz Jul 2019

A Corporate Duty To Rescue: Biopharmaceutical Companies And Access To Medications, Rebecca E. Wolitz

Indiana Law Journal

Controversies regarding the pricing of biopharmaceutical products are pervasive. Patients must choose between treatment and rent, prescriptions go unfilled, and health systems are forced to restrict access to life-saving medications— all because of cost. Though there is often consensus that these issues are problematic, there is disagreement as to what are appropriate solutions and who has responsibility to bring about those solutions. Most efforts to address biopharmaceutical pricing concerns focus on governmental regulation. This Article has a different focus. It provides a legal and normative analysis of a form of corporate self-regulation that could help address access and pricing concerns—a …


Money That Costs Too Much: Regulating Financial Incentives, Kristen Underhill Jul 2019

Money That Costs Too Much: Regulating Financial Incentives, Kristen Underhill

Indiana Law Journal

Money may not corrupt. But should we worry if it corrodes? Legal scholars in a range of fields have expressed concern about “motivational crowding-out,” a process by which offering financial rewards for good behavior may undermine laudable social motivations, like professionalism or civic duty. Disquiet about the motivational impacts of incentives has now extended to health law, employment law, tax, torts, contracts, criminal law, property, and beyond. In some cases, the fear of crowding-out has inspired concrete opposition to innovative policies that marshal incentives to change individual behavior. But to date, our fears about crowding-out have been unfocused and amorphous; …


Privacy Remedies, Lauren H. Scholz Apr 2019

Privacy Remedies, Lauren H. Scholz

Indiana Law Journal

When consumers sue companies for privacy-intrusive practices, they are often unsuccessful. Many cases fail in federal court at the motion to dismiss phase because the plaintiff has not shown the privacy infringement has caused her concrete harm. This is a symptom of a broader issue: the failure of courts and commentators to describe the relationship between privacy rights and privacy remedies.

This Article contends that restitution is the normal measure of privacy remedies. Restitution measures relief by economic gain to the defendant. If a plaintiff can show the likely ability to recover in restitution, that should be sufficient to pass …


Why Exempting Negligent Doctors May Reduce Suicide: An Empirical Analysis, John Shahar Dillbary, Griffin Edwards, Fredrick E. Vars Apr 2018

Why Exempting Negligent Doctors May Reduce Suicide: An Empirical Analysis, John Shahar Dillbary, Griffin Edwards, Fredrick E. Vars

Indiana Law Journal

This Article is the first to empirically analyze the impact of tort liability on suicide. Counter-intuitively, our analysis shows that suicide rates increase when potential tort liability is expanded to include psychiatrists—the very defendants who would seem best able to prevent suicide. Using a fifty-state panel regression for 1981 to 2013, we find that states which allowed psychiatrists (but not other doctors) to be liable for malpractice resulting in suicide experienced a 9.3% increase in suicides. On the other hand, and more intuitively, holding non-psychiatrist doctors liable de-creases suicide by 10.7%. These countervailing effects can be explained by psychiatrists facing …


The Prosser Myth Of Transferred Intent, Peter B. Kutner Jul 2016

The Prosser Myth Of Transferred Intent, Peter B. Kutner

Indiana Law Journal

The main theme of this Article is that Prosser advanced a mythical doctrine of transferred intent. What Prosser asserted to be the law was not the law when he wrote his article on transferred intent and amended his treatise. The cases he relied on to support his conclusions on transferred intent did not support them. Moreover, despite Prosser’s great influence on American tort law, Prosser’s position on transferred intent is not the law now and should not be. Its consequences are undesirable. Recognition of transferred intent as a basis of liability is due primarily to its inclusion in the First …


Terra Firma As Open Seas: Interpreting Kiobel In The Failed State Context, Drew F. Waldbeser Jul 2016

Terra Firma As Open Seas: Interpreting Kiobel In The Failed State Context, Drew F. Waldbeser

Indiana Law Journal

This Note will ultimately argue that, despite the expansive language in Kiobel, the Court’s reasoning does not necessarily foreclose all “foreign-cubed” claims. Suits alleging human rights violations originating from conduct that took place in failed states avoid the concerns the Court emphasized in Kiobel. The Court should allow jurisdiction for human rights offenses in failed states, despite their “foreign-cubed” nature, because the already existing rationale for allowing jurisdiction for international piracy offenses is highly analogous.

Part I of this Note explores the ATS jurisprudence leading up to and including Kiobel. Besides exploring the tensions and policy interests courts are grappling …


Fixing Failure To Warn, Aaron D. Twerski, James A. Henderson Jr. Jan 2015

Fixing Failure To Warn, Aaron D. Twerski, James A. Henderson Jr.

Indiana Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Twenty-First Century Tort Theories: The Internalist/Externalist Debate, Michael L. Rustad Apr 2013

Twenty-First Century Tort Theories: The Internalist/Externalist Debate, Michael L. Rustad

Indiana Law Journal

American Association of Law Schools Torts & Compensation Systems Panel


Civil Recourse Theory's Reductionism, Guido Calabresi Apr 2013

Civil Recourse Theory's Reductionism, Guido Calabresi

Indiana Law Journal

American Association of Law Schools Torts & Compensation Systems Panel


Beneath The Surface Of Civil Recourse Theory, Martha Chamallas Apr 2013

Beneath The Surface Of Civil Recourse Theory, Martha Chamallas

Indiana Law Journal

American Association of Law Schools Torts & Compensation Systems Panel


Two Roads Diverge For Civil Recourse Theory, Christopher J. Robinette Apr 2013

Two Roads Diverge For Civil Recourse Theory, Christopher J. Robinette

Indiana Law Journal

American Association of Law Schools Torts & Compensation Systems Panel


Instrumental And Noninstrumental Theories Of Tort Law, Richard A. Posner Apr 2013

Instrumental And Noninstrumental Theories Of Tort Law, Richard A. Posner

Indiana Law Journal

American Association of Law Schools Torts & Compensation Systems Panel


Civil Recourse Defended: A Reply To Posner, Calabresi, Rustard, Chamallas, And Robinette, John C. Goldberg, Benjamin Zipursky Apr 2013

Civil Recourse Defended: A Reply To Posner, Calabresi, Rustard, Chamallas, And Robinette, John C. Goldberg, Benjamin Zipursky

Indiana Law Journal

American Association of Law Schools Torts & Compensation Systems Panel


Lost Life And Life Projects, Sean Hannon Williams Oct 2012

Lost Life And Life Projects, Sean Hannon Williams

Indiana Law Journal

This Article provides the first analysis of wrongful death damages from the perspective of individual justice accounts of tort law. There is a widespread belief that wrongful death damages are incoherent. Currently, tort law responds only to the harms of the decedent’s living relatives. Drawing on deterrence rationales, Cass Sunstein, Eric Posner, and others have recommended altering these damage awards so that they respond to the harms of the decedent herself by providing “lost life” damages. This Article offers a different and powerful new foundation for lost life damages rooted in corrective justice and its main competitor, civil recourse. At …


Section 1983 Wrongful Death And Survival Actions In The Seventh Circuit: An Indiana Litigant's Guide To Claims After Russ V. Watts, Michelle R. Gough Jan 2011

Section 1983 Wrongful Death And Survival Actions In The Seventh Circuit: An Indiana Litigant's Guide To Claims After Russ V. Watts, Michelle R. Gough

Indiana Law Journal

The availability of survival and wrongful death damages in 42 U.S.C. § 1983 cases is an area that involves both changing precedent and unaddressed issues within the Seventh Circuit. In both of the aforementioned types of claims, the cases will necessarily involve the tangled application of both state and federal law, and the Seventh Circuit and other federal courts of appeals have struggled to provide a clear, coherent approach to these issues. Indeed, there is strong disagreement among the circuits. Dean Steven H. Steinglass offered the most comprehensive discussion of the nature of both types of claims under § 1983 …


Lies, Damned Lies, And Statistics? Structured Settlements, Factoring, And The Federal Government, Laura J. Koenig Jul 2007

Lies, Damned Lies, And Statistics? Structured Settlements, Factoring, And The Federal Government, Laura J. Koenig

Indiana Law Journal

No abstract provided.


When Plaintiffs Are Premium Planners For Their Injuries: A Fresh Look At The Fireman's Rule, Robert H. Heidt Jul 2007

When Plaintiffs Are Premium Planners For Their Injuries: A Fresh Look At The Fireman's Rule, Robert H. Heidt

Indiana Law Journal

No abstract provided.


The Kindynamic Theory Of Tort, Christopher P. Guzelian Oct 2005

The Kindynamic Theory Of Tort, Christopher P. Guzelian

Indiana Law Journal

Commentators complain of two major deficiencies in modern tort law: (1) that liability concepts such as "negligence" or "duty " are so vacuously defined as to permit inadvertent subjectivity and error to hinder proper case adjudication, and (2) that tort is too slow in recognizing newly discovered risks and properly compensating nascent classes of injury. We accordingly report on the Kindynamic Theory, an emerging philosophy that overcomes these twin deficiencies and sharpens understanding of poorly articulated tort intuitions

Kindynamics contends that causation is the cornerstone of tort, and that all risks are, at core, causal propositions. Contrary to its many …


Tort Liability After The Dust Settles: An Economic Analysis Of The Airline Defendants' Duty To Ground Victims In The September 11 Litigation, David Y. Stevens Apr 2005

Tort Liability After The Dust Settles: An Economic Analysis Of The Airline Defendants' Duty To Ground Victims In The September 11 Litigation, David Y. Stevens

Indiana Law Journal

No abstract provided.


The Dangerous Allure Of The Issue Class Action, Laura J. Hines Jul 2004

The Dangerous Allure Of The Issue Class Action, Laura J. Hines

Indiana Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Hubbard V. Greeson: Indiana's Misapplication Of The Tort Sections Of The Restatement (Second) Of Conflict Of Laws, David A. Moore Apr 2004

Hubbard V. Greeson: Indiana's Misapplication Of The Tort Sections Of The Restatement (Second) Of Conflict Of Laws, David A. Moore

Indiana Law Journal

No abstract provided.


"United We Stand": Managing Choice-Of- Law Problems In September-11-Based Toxic Torts Through Federal Substantive Mass- Tort Law, Kenneth G. Kubes Oct 2002

"United We Stand": Managing Choice-Of- Law Problems In September-11-Based Toxic Torts Through Federal Substantive Mass- Tort Law, Kenneth G. Kubes

Indiana Law Journal

No abstract provided.


A Right Without A Potent Remedy: Indiana's Bad Faith Insurance Doctrine Leaves Injured Third Parties Without Full Redress, Gregory A. Bullman Oct 2002

A Right Without A Potent Remedy: Indiana's Bad Faith Insurance Doctrine Leaves Injured Third Parties Without Full Redress, Gregory A. Bullman

Indiana Law Journal

No abstract provided.