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Saint Louis University School of Law

Environmental Law

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Full-Text Articles in Law

Human Rights Guidance For Environmental Justice Attorneys, Lauren E. Bartlett Jan 2020

Human Rights Guidance For Environmental Justice Attorneys, Lauren E. Bartlett

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People of color in the United States face worsening environmental conditions and disproportionate environmental harms. Climate change is causing hurricanes to ravage our coasts with increasing intensity and frequency, tornados to sweep across our plains even in the “off” season, and severe flooding that threatens to wipe out entire towns. Moreover, people of color must disproportionately deal with heat and air pollution, toxic waste dumps, contaminants in drinking water, failing aged sanitation systems, negative health effects, and the lack of access to a true remedy, outside of their own pockets, for these injustices. While there is a robust environmental movement ...


American Legal History Survey: Syllabus, Anders Walker Jan 2012

American Legal History Survey: Syllabus, Anders Walker

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This syllabus provides an overview of American Legal History, focusing on the manner in which law has been used to organize American society. Several themes will be traced through the semester, including law’s role in encouraging innovation and regulating social relations, in part through the elaboration of legal disciplines like property, tort, contract, criminal law, tax, business associations, administrative law, environmental law, securities regulation, commercial law, immigration, and health law. Emphasis will also be placed on the origins and evolution of constitutional law, from the founding to the present.


Nascar Green: The Problem Of Sustainability In Corporations And Corporate Law, Matthew T. Bodie Jan 2011

Nascar Green: The Problem Of Sustainability In Corporations And Corporate Law, Matthew T. Bodie

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The concept of "sustainability" is, at root, about a commitment to considering the future of the planet in our everyday affairs. In the corporate law context, supporters of sustainability seek to integrate these long-term environmental and social concerns into the corporation's DNA. This article seeks to explore sustainability as a corporate law concept by looking at the sustainability efforts of NASCAR and its affiliated firms. NASCAR has undertaken a series of "green" initiatives, most notably in the promotion of alternative fuels. These sustainability efforts are facilitated, in part, by the unusual structure of NASCAR and the sport of stock-car ...


Rethinking The Kyoto Protocol: Are There Legal Solutions To Global Warming And Climate Change?, Douglas R. Williams, Anita Halvorssen, J. Kevin Healy, William Pizer, Jacob Werksman Jan 2006

Rethinking The Kyoto Protocol: Are There Legal Solutions To Global Warming And Climate Change?, Douglas R. Williams, Anita Halvorssen, J. Kevin Healy, William Pizer, Jacob Werksman

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Professor Williams moderates a panel discussion of the Kyoto Protocol and potential solutions to climate change. Other participants include Anita Halvorssen, J. Kevin Healy, William Pizer, and Jacob Werksman.


When Voluntary, Incentive-Based Controls Fail: Structuring A Regulatory Response To Agricultural Nonpoint Source Water Pollution, Douglas R. Williams Jan 2002

When Voluntary, Incentive-Based Controls Fail: Structuring A Regulatory Response To Agricultural Nonpoint Source Water Pollution, Douglas R. Williams

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This article is part of the Symposium, Sustainable Agriculture: Food for the Future. Recognizing that, to date, farms had largely escaped regulation under the Clean Water Act, and that agricultural nonpoint source pollution is a leading contributor to impaired water quality, this article advocates for a regulatory response to such pollution. It considers existing programs to control nonpoint source pollution and demonstrates that they are inadequate. The article makes three recommendations: (1) an increased federal regulatory presence is needed; (2) the costs of implementing nonpoint source controls should be distributed in a pragmatic way that recognizes the extraordinary organizational presence ...