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Saint Louis University School of Law

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Full-Text Articles in Law

Meat, The Future: The Role Of Regulators In The Lab-Grown Revolution, Joseph B. Davault, Michael S. Sinha Apr 2025

Meat, The Future: The Role Of Regulators In The Lab-Grown Revolution, Joseph B. Davault, Michael S. Sinha

All Faculty Scholarship

The United States is one of the largest consumers of meat globally. The production of meat contributes substantially to climate change due to the levels of greenhouse gasses emitted and the amount of land, water, feed, and other natural resources required to raise animals used for meat. Traditional meat production is another major source for the emergence of zoonotic diseases and antimicrobial-resistant pathogens. Nevertheless, Americans consume more meat now than at any time in the nation’s history.

Advocates for policy change aimed at addressing the risks associated with meat production have typically focused on reducing meat consumption, alternatives to meat, …


Labeling Energy Drinks: Tackling A Monster Of A Problem, Meredith P. Mulhern, Michael S. Sinha Oct 2024

Labeling Energy Drinks: Tackling A Monster Of A Problem, Meredith P. Mulhern, Michael S. Sinha

All Faculty Scholarship

Energy drinks first rose to popularity in the 1980s. Red Bull energy drinks were the first of its kind, opening the door to a new consumer and regulatory landscape. Since Red Bull first launched, multiple companies have released countless new energy drink products. Some energy drinks, like Red Bull, contain less than 100 mg of caffeine per 8 oz can. However, other energy drinks contain much higher amounts of caffeine. A 12 oz can of Celsius contains 200 mg of caffeine, and up until recently, Celsius offered a product called Celsius Heat, a 12 oz can containing 300 mg of …


Mississippi's Contribution To Informing The Push For Federal Legislation, Nolan G. Forthaus Apr 2024

Mississippi's Contribution To Informing The Push For Federal Legislation, Nolan G. Forthaus

SLU Law Journal Online

The NIL (Name, Image, and Likeness) legislation landscape is rapidly evolving, affecting how college athletes can profit from their NIL. While college athletes nationwide can now benefit from their NIL, state laws play a crucial role. Under the interim policy, college athletes attending schools in states with active NIL laws must comply with those state laws and any institutional and conference policies. The interim policy remains in effect until federal legislation or new NCAA rules are adopted. The state laws of Mississippi can help inform the federal push for a NIL bill.


“White Collar Crime” Is A Euphemism To Abandon, Anthony J. Meyer Apr 2024

“White Collar Crime” Is A Euphemism To Abandon, Anthony J. Meyer

SLU Law Journal Online

Although the phrase “white collar crime” is ubiquitous among lawyers, it is a euphemism that creates an arbitrary distinction among crimes and perpetuates an upper-class bias for certain types of criminal conduct while simultaneously denigrating others. The phrase further performs a problematic social signaling function, including by expressly invoking “whiteness.” On balance, the phrase should be abandoned and replaced with one that either creates a meaningful distinction or leads to more inclusiveness in the legal practice.


The Misguided Use Of The Harvard/Unc Ruling To Thwart Law Firm And Other Private Employer Dei Efforts, Ronald A. Norwood Apr 2024

The Misguided Use Of The Harvard/Unc Ruling To Thwart Law Firm And Other Private Employer Dei Efforts, Ronald A. Norwood

SLU Law Journal Online

This article explores the Harvard/UNC ruling and what, in the author’s view, is the misguided efforts by certain political and well-financed private actors to use that ruling to justify the eradication of private employers and law firm DEI efforts. It is the author’s firm belief that because the Supreme Court’s holding is limited to an analysis of the Constitution’s Equal Protection clause (limited to state actors) and Title VI (covering private actions receiving federal funding), that ruling should not be used by courts to quash DEI programs designed to level the employment playing field for minorities, women and other protected …


Walking The Tightrope: Protecting Research From Foreign Exploitation While Fostering Relationships With Foreign Scientists, C. John Cox Apr 2024

Walking The Tightrope: Protecting Research From Foreign Exploitation While Fostering Relationships With Foreign Scientists, C. John Cox

SLU Law Journal Online

In response to extensive foreign efforts to take advantage of U.S. scientific research, especially by the People’s Republic of China, the United States has taken steps to protect its scientific and technology efforts. Although steps to prevent foreign government exploitation of U.S. research are reasonable and justified, the United States should be cognizant of these actions' impact on collaboration with foreign scientists. It is in the interest of the United States to effect policy that fosters relationships with foreign scientists rather than push them away.


I’M Not Lovin’ It: Re-Thinking Fast Food Advertising, Brody Shea, Michael S. Sinha Apr 2024

I’M Not Lovin’ It: Re-Thinking Fast Food Advertising, Brody Shea, Michael S. Sinha

All Faculty Scholarship

In 1971, the Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”) and the Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”) agreed to prevent injury and deception to the consumer in advertising, detailing their respective roles in a Memorandum of Understanding (“MOU”).1 The MOU proscribes that the FTC regulates truth in advertising relating to foods, drugs, devices and cosmetics while the FDA controls labeling and the misbranding of foods, drugs, devices, and cosmetics shipped in interstate commerce.2 The MOU has been amended and an addendum added since 1971, but the material provisions have remained consistent for over a half-century.3

Importantly, the FDA and the …


Immunity Through Bankruptcy For The Sackler Family, Daniel G. Aaron, Michael S. Sinha Apr 2024

Immunity Through Bankruptcy For The Sackler Family, Daniel G. Aaron, Michael S. Sinha

All Faculty Scholarship

In August 2023, the U.S. Supreme Court temporarily blocked one of the largest public health settlements in history: that of Purdue Pharma, L.P., reached in bankruptcy court. The negotiated bankruptcy settlement approved by the court would give a golden parachute to the very people thought to have ignited the opioid crisis: the Sackler family. As the Supreme Court considers the propriety of immunity through bankruptcy, the case has raised fundamental questions about whether bankruptcy is a proper refuge from tort liability and whether law checks power or law serves power.

Of course, bankruptcy courts often limit liability against a distressed …


Unpatenting Product Hops, Michael S. Sinha Jan 2024

Unpatenting Product Hops, Michael S. Sinha

All Faculty Scholarship

On July 9, 2021, President Joseph R. Biden signed Executive Order 14036 (“Promoting Competition in the American Economy”), which directed the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) to collaborate on new approaches to increasing competition and lowering prices in the pharmaceutical marketplace. In response, the USPTO outlined several new initiatives, among them an intent to improve the robustness and reliability of issued patents.

A major impetus for the Executive Order was the pervasive nature of pharmaceutical product hopping, which occurs when manufacturers introduce new follow-on versions of lucrative pharmaceutical products to the …


Ai Renaissance: Pharmaceuticals And Diagnostic Medicine, Ty J. Feeney, Michael S. Sinha Jan 2024

Ai Renaissance: Pharmaceuticals And Diagnostic Medicine, Ty J. Feeney, Michael S. Sinha

All Faculty Scholarship

The explosive growth of Artificial Intelligence (AI) in the modern era has led to significant advancements in the world of medicine. In drug discovery, AI technology is used to classify proteins as drug targets or non-targets for specific diseases, more accurately interpret and describe pharmacology in a quantitative fashion, and predict protein structures based on only a protein sequence for input. AI methods are used in drug development to generate predictive models for drug screening purposes, refine and modify candidate structures of drugs to optimize compounds, and predict a drug’s physiochemical properties, bioactivity, and toxicity. For medical devices, the advancement …


Fool Me Once … Why The American Data Privacy Act Proposal Fails To Adequately Deter Data Privacy Violations, Melissa Mann May 2023

Fool Me Once … Why The American Data Privacy Act Proposal Fails To Adequately Deter Data Privacy Violations, Melissa Mann

SLU Law Journal Online

The recent Supreme Court decision of Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization raises many questions regarding the privacy of health data. In this article, Melissa Mann discusses some concerns that may arise with the use health applications to track personal data and potential privacy laws that could be enacted to protect these users.


How Intellectual Property Laws Allow For Fashion Dupes, Miranda Nolan May 2023

How Intellectual Property Laws Allow For Fashion Dupes, Miranda Nolan

SLU Law Journal Online

The rise of technology brought an increase in the number of "knockoff" fashion pieces that are easily accessible to consumers. In this article, Miranda Nolan discusses the impact and growth of fast fashion brands that changed fashion for average Americans who are unable to afford luxury brands.


Rethinking The Value Of Originalism, Tobias Gibson, Jakob Gibson, Matthew Trout May 2023

Rethinking The Value Of Originalism, Tobias Gibson, Jakob Gibson, Matthew Trout

SLU Law Journal Online

Originalism is one of many approaches to Constitutional interpretation that has evolved and changed from the time of its inception. In this article, Tobias Gibson, Jakob Gibson, and Matthew Trout discusses the disagreement between the application and interpretation of what originalism constitutes and mandates.


California Law Changes The Fashion Industry Furever: First Statewide Fur Ban Takes Effect This Year, Mikee Olegario Apr 2023

California Law Changes The Fashion Industry Furever: First Statewide Fur Ban Takes Effect This Year, Mikee Olegario

SLU Law Journal Online

On January 1st of this year, California made history in becoming the first to enact a statewide fur ban, prohibiting the sale of new clothing and accessories made of fur. This article explores the potential implications of the ban for the state, California's influence in the fashion industry, and the future of the fur industry for the rest of the nation. In this article, Mikee Olegario will use these factors to analyze how one state's bill could have a major impact on ethical fashion forever.


Closing The Uptake Gap: Why Missouri Should Pass The Clean Slate Bill, Chloë Driscoll Apr 2023

Closing The Uptake Gap: Why Missouri Should Pass The Clean Slate Bill, Chloë Driscoll

SLU Law Journal Online

The proposed Clean Slate Bill, or Missouri House Bill 352, aims to create an automatic expungement process for eligible individuals in Missouri. Less than one percent of eligible Missourians have had their records expunged under the current system, creating what is known as an “uptake gap” that unfairly perpetuates barriers to housing, employment, and education. In this article, Chloë Driscoll advocates for the passage of the Clean Slate Bill, explaining the problems with the current expungement system and the benefits of closing the uptake gap.


Chatgpt – What An Attorney Needs To Know When Using This New Tool, Grant Gamm Mar 2023

Chatgpt – What An Attorney Needs To Know When Using This New Tool, Grant Gamm

SLU Law Journal Online

There is a large potential impact of ChatGPT, an AI language processing model, on the legal industry. In this article, Grant Gamm highlights the various benefits and limitations of the new technology, while emphasizing ethical considerations that attorneys must keep in mind when using it. The article also touches on the broader issues of bias and "hallucinations" that can arise with AI tools and their potential impact on society. Overall, the article highlights the need for attorneys to maintain competence in technological advancements and be vigilant about ethical implications when adopting new tools like ChatGPT.


Upholding Longstanding Prohibitions On Firearm Possession Under Bruen, Mitchell Gordon Mar 2023

Upholding Longstanding Prohibitions On Firearm Possession Under Bruen, Mitchell Gordon

SLU Law Journal Online

The Supreme Court’s decision in New York State Rifle & Pistol Association, Inc. v. Bruen has cast doubt on the constitutionality of federal firearms possession laws, such as the prohibition on felons possessing guns. This piece examines how one federal district court upheld a federal restriction on felon gun possession in the recent wake of the Bruen decision. In this article, Mitchell Gordon especially focuses on the historical facts and analysis that are now required under Bruen in order to uphold a governmental restriction on Second Amendment rights.


Overview Of Missouri Appellate Briefing Rules And The Case Of Hicks V. Northland-Smithville, Steve Lockwood Mar 2023

Overview Of Missouri Appellate Briefing Rules And The Case Of Hicks V. Northland-Smithville, Steve Lockwood

SLU Law Journal Online

Starting with the Missouri Supreme Court's 2022 opinion in Lexow v. Boeing Co., appellate courts have put renewed emphasis on the requirements of Rule 84.04. The recent opinion by the Western District Court of Appeals, Hicks v. Northland-Smithville, and several predecessor opinions to Hicks, are a lesson and reminder to practitioners to strictly adhere to the Missouri Rules of Appellate Procedure, specifically Rule 84.04. In this article, Steve Lockwood will discuss Hicks and the implications of the opinion.


Prioritizing Patients Or Impropriety?: Why The 8th Circuit’S Cairns Decision Sets A Dangerous Precedent Jeopardizing Patient Protection And Government Investment In Federal Programs, Nicole Beachboard Mar 2023

Prioritizing Patients Or Impropriety?: Why The 8th Circuit’S Cairns Decision Sets A Dangerous Precedent Jeopardizing Patient Protection And Government Investment In Federal Programs, Nicole Beachboard

SLU Law Journal Online

In July 2022, the 8th Circuit established a stricter causation standard for plaintiffs alleging a False Claims Act claim through a violation of the Anti-Kickback Statute in United States ex rel. Cairns v. D.S. Medical LLC. The requirement that a plaintiff demonstrate but-for causation stands in stark contrast to the 3rd Circuit’s “at least one claim standard.” In this article, Nicole Beachboard addresses how the 8th Circuit’s decision enforces an onerous burden on the plaintiff, undermines statutory authority, and facilitates defendant misconduct.


That’S It? Scrutinizing The Marshal Of The Supreme Court’S Role In An Investigation Within The Context Of 28 U.S.C. § 672, Josh Zoeller Feb 2023

That’S It? Scrutinizing The Marshal Of The Supreme Court’S Role In An Investigation Within The Context Of 28 U.S.C. § 672, Josh Zoeller

SLU Law Journal Online

In May 2022, the Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization majority opinion was leaked to the news outlet POLITICO. Very quickly thereafter, Chief Justice Roberts ordered the Marshal of the U.S. Supreme Court to investigate who was responsible for the leak. In this article, Josh Zoeller scrutinizes the Marshal’s report on the investigation while providing background on the Marshal’s role at the Court and how the position is statutorily defined.


Epa And Army’S New Wotus Definition And Another Finalized Rule This Spring, Joe Retzer Jan 2023

Epa And Army’S New Wotus Definition And Another Finalized Rule This Spring, Joe Retzer

SLU Law Journal Online

On December 30, 2022, the EPA finalized its rule interpreting "waters of the United States," which redefined the boundaries of the Clean Water Act's jurisdiction. In this article, Joe Retzer discusses the new rule that attempts to implement public input by providing a definition that is clear and consistent for stakeholders and discusses future rules that may be on the horizon.


Political Subdivisions, Homelessness, And Vacancy: How Missouri’S Use Of Logrolling Passed House Bill 1606, Kateri Busiek Jan 2023

Political Subdivisions, Homelessness, And Vacancy: How Missouri’S Use Of Logrolling Passed House Bill 1606, Kateri Busiek

SLU Law Journal Online

In June of 2022, Governor Parson signed into law House Bill 1606. HB 1606 contains a diverse set of provisions concerning county financial statements, unlawful camping on state-owned property, and penalties for landowners of vacant property. In this article, Kateri Busiek discusses how House Bill 1606 violates the Missouri Constitution.


Running A Different Route: How Youtube Tv Plans To Avoid Antitrust Violations, Brody Shea Jan 2023

Running A Different Route: How Youtube Tv Plans To Avoid Antitrust Violations, Brody Shea

SLU Law Journal Online

After reaching a deal this past December, YouTube TV is now the sole option for NFL Sunday Ticket subscribers. By providing out-of-market sports games in a bundled package, YouTube TV runs the risk of violating the Sherman Antitrust Act. In this article, Brody Shea addresses how YouTube TV can avoid future litigation.


At A Glance: Defining Missouri’S Homeschooling Regulations, Christine Hall Jan 2023

At A Glance: Defining Missouri’S Homeschooling Regulations, Christine Hall

SLU Law Journal Online

American parents have a right to homeschool their children, and it is only growing in popularity. Each state has the power to regulate homeschooling, and some do not regulate it at all. In this article, Christine Hall analyzes the practical application of Missouri's homeschooling statute and argues for a change in these regulations.


Re-Examining The Landscape Of Employee Drug-Testing In Missouri Post-Amendment 3, Paige Hume Jan 2023

Re-Examining The Landscape Of Employee Drug-Testing In Missouri Post-Amendment 3, Paige Hume

SLU Law Journal Online

In November 2022, Missouri residents voted to ratify Amendment 3 to the state constitution and make the recreational use of marijuana legal. Yet, Missouri is one of only a few states that does not have protections for private employment drug testing. In this article, Paige Hume discusses the landscape of employment drug testing in Missouri, as well as the impact of the new amendment on workers.


Masthead Jan 2023

Masthead

Saint Louis University Journal of Health Law & Policy

No abstract provided.


Gender Identity, Health, And The Law: An Overview Of Key Laws Impacting The Health Of Transgender And Gender Non-Conforming People, Naomi Seiler, Amanda Spott, Mekhi Washington, Paige Organick-Lee, Aaron Karacuschansky, Gregory Dwyer, Katie Horton, Alexis Osei Jan 2023

Gender Identity, Health, And The Law: An Overview Of Key Laws Impacting The Health Of Transgender And Gender Non-Conforming People, Naomi Seiler, Amanda Spott, Mekhi Washington, Paige Organick-Lee, Aaron Karacuschansky, Gregory Dwyer, Katie Horton, Alexis Osei

Saint Louis University Journal of Health Law & Policy

A growing population of transgender, nonbinary, and other gender non-conforming Americans experience the burden of multiple physical and mental health inequities. Largely rooted in discrimination and stigma, these disparities are compounded by barriers to respectful, appropriate healthcare.

A range of new policies, including state laws attempting to limit access to gender-affirming care for minors, may further compound health disparities. However, in some states and at the federal level, protective laws seek to prohibit discrimination and support access to care. Meanwhile, the constitutional status of gender identity under the Equal Protection Clause, and the legality of certain federal protections challenged on …


The Battle For Medicare, Isaac D. Buck Jan 2023

The Battle For Medicare, Isaac D. Buck

Saint Louis University Journal of Health Law & Policy

America is aging. From 2019 to 2060, the total population of Americans over sixty-five will grow from fifty-four million to ninety-five million. Of all Americans, sixteen percent were aged sixty-five and older in 2019; nearly twenty-two percent are projected to be in this age group by 2040. This shift will put unprecedented pressure on the Medicare program. Its enrollment is already in the midst of an unparalleled boom, growing from forty-eight million in 2010 to eighty-six million by just 2035. As it grows in importance and size, the future of Medicare will be dominated by two competing pressures.

First, Medicare …


The Future Of Health Care Must Be Harm Reductionist—To Bring It About, We Need Moral Philosophy, Travis N. Rieder Jan 2023

The Future Of Health Care Must Be Harm Reductionist—To Bring It About, We Need Moral Philosophy, Travis N. Rieder

Saint Louis University Journal of Health Law & Policy

In the United States, more than 100,000 people now die each year from drug overdose, but nearly all of these deaths are preventable. The purpose of this Article is to show that harm reduction interventions could go a long way towards saving these lives, but we don’t adopt many of these interventions, or fail to adopt them at the scale needed. Although it is often suggested by opponents of harm reduction that the interventions are unlikely to actually reduce harm, this Article argues that the empirical debate is largely over—decades of data demonstrate that harm reduction saves lives, promotes health, …


Inefficacy Of The Transparency In Coverage Final Rule In Promoting Cost-Effective Choices, Abigail Jaeger Jan 2023

Inefficacy Of The Transparency In Coverage Final Rule In Promoting Cost-Effective Choices, Abigail Jaeger

Saint Louis University Journal of Health Law & Policy

The Transparency in Coverage Final Rule requires health plans to provide beneficiaries with financial information such as estimates of their personalized cost-sharing liabilities for items and services offered by different providers, the plan’s negotiated in-network rates with these providers, and the plan’s allowed out-of-network amounts. The Final Rule is designed to enhance consumers’ access to pricing information under their health plan so they have the ability to make well-informed and cost-effective decisions regarding their health care. However, empirical evidence suggests that the Final Rule will not effectuate its intended purpose. Many consumers lack the high level of health insurance comprehension …