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Full-Text Articles in Law

Retaliation Or Arbitration – Or Both: The 1978 United States-France Aviation Dispute, Lori Fisler Damrosch Jan 1980

Retaliation Or Arbitration – Or Both: The 1978 United States-France Aviation Dispute, Lori Fisler Damrosch

Faculty Scholarship

It began as a very small dispute. Pan American World Airways planned to introduce a service from San Francisco to Paris with a stop in London, using a Boeing 747 aircraft from San Francisco to London and a smaller Boeing 727 aircraft from London to Paris. The change to a smaller plane would have enabled the most efficient and economic use of Pan Am's fleet. In aviation as in railroad terminology, a change along a route to equipment of a different size is called a "change of gauge."

In accordance with French law, Pan Am filed a schedule on February …


Disqualifications Of Decisional Officials In Rulemaking, Peter L. Strauss Jan 1980

Disqualifications Of Decisional Officials In Rulemaking, Peter L. Strauss

Faculty Scholarship

What constraints on impartiality govern agency officials responsible for decisions in proceedings other than on-the-record adjudications? The past few years have witnessed the emergence of a striking body of professional debate, statute, and case law concerning ethics in government and the control of "special interest" influence on governmental decisions. Higher standards for conflict of interest, expanded constraints on ex parte communications, and enlarged concems about separation of functions within the agencies are parts of this development. Another strand, tangled with the others yet doctrinally distinct, concerns the disqualification of responsible government officials for their prior contacts with or expressions of …


Manifest Criminality, Criminal Intent, And The Metamorphosis Of Lloyd Weinreb, George P. Fletcher Jan 1980

Manifest Criminality, Criminal Intent, And The Metamorphosis Of Lloyd Weinreb, George P. Fletcher

Faculty Scholarship

My colleague has had a revelation. Professor Lloyd Weinreb's views about larceny have undergone a striking transformation in the last six months. As recently as May 1980, when he completed the preface to the third edition of his criminal law casebook, he held one set of views about The Carrier's Case and The King v. Pear. In the article published in this issue, he advances a different set of views about the two cases he regards as so important. He gives us no hint about how or why he underwent his change of heart. His transformation warrants our attention, …


Revenue Seeking: A Generalization Of The Theory Of Tariffs, Jagdish N. Bhagwati, T.N. Srinivasan Jan 1980

Revenue Seeking: A Generalization Of The Theory Of Tariffs, Jagdish N. Bhagwati, T.N. Srinivasan

Faculty Scholarship

The theory of commercial policy has recently addressed three phenomena: (i) tariff (quota) seeking or lobbying by potential beneficiaries for the imposition of a tariff (quota), (ii) tariff (quota) evasion, and (iii) rent seeking or lobbying for getting an allocation of the import quota to earn the rents generated. Revenue seeking or lobbying to secure a share in the disposition of the tariff revenues is analyzed here. It is shown that revenue seeking may, even for a small country, result in a reduction in importable output. Furthermore, revenue seeking may be welfare improving. Rent seeking may be welfare improving as …


Corporate Crime And Punishment: A Non-Chicago View Of The Economics Of Criminal Sanctions, John C. Coffee Jr. Jan 1980

Corporate Crime And Punishment: A Non-Chicago View Of The Economics Of Criminal Sanctions, John C. Coffee Jr.

Faculty Scholarship

In this article, Professor Coffee argues that fines are an inefficient means by which to deter organizational crimes. Instead, he urges a focus on the individual decision-maker and a system of competitive bids with respect to the choice of a fine as an alternative punishment.


Trade In Place Of Migration, Jagdish N. Bhagwati Jan 1980

Trade In Place Of Migration, Jagdish N. Bhagwati

Faculty Scholarship

This is a very useful and welcome study, sponsored by the World Employment Programme of the I.L.O., of the effects that increased trade flows could have on the level of employment in one “receiving country,” West Germany, and two sending countries, “Spain and Turkey,” and their implications for immigration policies.


Democracy And Distrust: A Theory Of Judicial Review, Gerard E. Lynch Jan 1980

Democracy And Distrust: A Theory Of Judicial Review, Gerard E. Lynch

Faculty Scholarship

John Hart Ely's Democracy and Distrust is an ambitious attempt to create a new theory of judicial review, breaking away from both "interpretivism" and "noninterpretivism" – a division Professor Ely regards as a "false dichotomy" (p. vii). The book is brilliant and provocative, so much so that one fears less that its faults will be obscured – there is little danger that polemic critics will fail to pounce on them – than that the flash of Professor Ely's reasoning and the controversy it generates will distract us from the genuine importance of the insight that powers his analysis.


Rebuttal: The Individual Or The Firm? Focusing The Threat Of Criminal Liability, John C. Coffee Jr. Jan 1980

Rebuttal: The Individual Or The Firm? Focusing The Threat Of Criminal Liability, John C. Coffee Jr.

Faculty Scholarship

I cannot disagree with much of what Mr. Crane has said in his very articulate presentation. One must be careful about trying to prove too much. I have not argued against individual criminal liability, but I do not believe we can rely on it exclusively. Let me therefore confine my reply to this question and to Mr. Crane's criticisms of my equity fine proposal.


Making The Punishment Fit The Corporation: The Problem Of Finding An Optimal Corporation Criminal Sanction, John C. Coffee Jr. Jan 1980

Making The Punishment Fit The Corporation: The Problem Of Finding An Optimal Corporation Criminal Sanction, John C. Coffee Jr.

Faculty Scholarship

To be "present at the creation," in Dean Acheson's felicitous phrase, is always an honor. In addition, to be present at the commencement of what I expect will be a sustained and fruitful tradition at this law school, namely, the Governor Thompson Lectureship, is a second honor. Finally, let me express my thanks to Dean Bainbridge for a third honor: the compliment implicit in the 2 to 1 odds he has arranged today. Both Norval Morris and Mark Crane are men with distinguished careers in quite different fields of the law. If I am confident of one thing today, it …


Homo Psychologicus: Notes On A New Legal Formalism, William H. Simon Jan 1980

Homo Psychologicus: Notes On A New Legal Formalism, William H. Simon

Faculty Scholarship

Having survived the assault of the Realists earlier in this century, the doctrinal tradition in legal theory and legal education is undergoing a second wave of criticism. Again, doctrinal writing and education is charged with promoting a conservative ideological perspective and with ignoring the practical tasks of lawyering. Law schools are criticized for failing both to train competent practitioners and to instill in their students an appropriate sense of "responsibility."

One of the most interesting aspects of this second wave of criticism has been the emergence of a new style of discourse about law inspired by psychology. This style, which …


Judicial Review And The National Political Process: A Functional Reconsideration Of The Role Of The Supreme Court, Henry Paul Monaghan Jan 1980

Judicial Review And The National Political Process: A Functional Reconsideration Of The Role Of The Supreme Court, Henry Paul Monaghan

Faculty Scholarship

Imagine a cold morning early in February. Slowly sipping coffee in an effort to awaken fully, you are reading through the Supreme Court advance sheets. You come across the following brief opinion:

PER CURIAM. Fisher v. Rye Co., No. 81-1, and First Savings Bank v. Smith, No. 81-2. These petitions for certiorari have been consolidated for disposition in a single opin-ion. No. 81-1 challenges an Executive Order that, in an effort to combat gender-based discrimination, requires government contractors to adopt affirmative action programs. No argument is made that the Executive Order is authorized by statute. Concluding that the …


The Burger Court And "Our Federalism", Henry Paul Monaghan Jan 1980

The Burger Court And "Our Federalism", Henry Paul Monaghan

Faculty Scholarship

Dicey derided federal government as "weak government;" others have found genius lurking in its institutional arrangements. But most students, as Professor S. R. Davis's illuminating little book makes clear, have considerable difficulty in identifying what federal government is, whether the concept is approached analytically, legally, descriptively or normatively. American lawyers are not inclined to pursue such inquiries too far. For, like Justice Black, they are concerned only with "Our Federalism" and, like Justice Stewart and obscenity, they know it when they see it. Moreover, American lawyers have, in large measure, confined their attention to one specific component of "Our …


Constitutional Fate, Philip Chase Bobbitt Jan 1980

Constitutional Fate, Philip Chase Bobbitt

Faculty Scholarship

The Mary Ireland Graves Dougherty Lectures in Constitutional Law were established in 1979 at the University of Texas School of Law in the memory of Mrs. Dougherty by her family. Professor Bobbitt delivered the inaugural series of these lectures on three evenings in April 1979. Of those in attendance, only Professor Bobbitt's students, who had witnessed the evolution of his ideas during that year, and a few colleagues with whom he must have shared his thoughts, could have expected what followed on those spring evenings in Austin. His subject was "the question of judicial review." So stated, the subject hardly …