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Full-Text Articles in Law

Grab The Fire Extinguisher Comparing Uk Schemes Of Arrangement To U.S. Corporate Bankruptcy After Jevic, David S. Stevenson Nov 2019

Grab The Fire Extinguisher Comparing Uk Schemes Of Arrangement To U.S. Corporate Bankruptcy After Jevic, David S. Stevenson

Cleveland State Law Review

Corporations overwhelmed with debt frequently turn to the courts for help to restructure their credit obligations, but some courts are more helpful than others. This is especially true when creditors cannot agree on a particular resolution, let alone when some creditors will not be paid at all. International corporations often have a choice of forum—and substantive insolvency law—based on their legal and physical presence in dozens or even hundreds of countries. The UK and U.S. offer different avenues for using insolvency law to restructure debts without total liquidation, and the American avenue has become more difficult to ...


Justice Scalia’S Bankruptcy Jurisprudence: The Right Judicial Philosophy For The Modern Bankruptcy Code?, Megan Mcdermott Nov 2017

Justice Scalia’S Bankruptcy Jurisprudence: The Right Judicial Philosophy For The Modern Bankruptcy Code?, Megan Mcdermott

Utah Law Review

This Article surveys an area of Justice Scalia’s legacy that is often overlooked by scholars who write broadly about the Supreme Court: his many contributions to the field of bankruptcy law. The Bankruptcy Code is rife with statutory interpretation questions that demand clear and predictable answers, due to the efficiency interests at stake and the absence of any intermediate interpretive forces, such as administrative agencies. Justice Scalia arrived on the high court at the outset of the modern bankruptcy era and this Article argues that his brand of rulebased textualism is a particularly good fit for bankruptcy law.

Specifically ...


House Swaps: A Strategic Bankruptcy Solution To The Foreclosure Crisis, Lynn M. Lopucki Mar 2014

House Swaps: A Strategic Bankruptcy Solution To The Foreclosure Crisis, Lynn M. Lopucki

Michigan Law Review

Since the price peak in 2006, home values have fallen more than 30 percent, leaving millions of Americans with negative equity in their homes. Until the Supreme Court’s 1993 decision in Nobelman v. American Savings Bank, the bankruptcy system would have provided many such homeowners with a remedy. They could have filed bankruptcy, discharged the negative equity, committed to pay the mortgage holders the full values of their homes, and retained those homes. In Nobelman, however, the Court misinterpreted reasonably clear statutory language and invented legislative history to resolve a three-to-one split of circuits in favor of the minority ...


Considerations For Private Equity Firms When Utilizing Chapter 11 New Value Deals, Alexandra Wilde Jan 2012

Considerations For Private Equity Firms When Utilizing Chapter 11 New Value Deals, Alexandra Wilde

Michigan Business & Entrepreneurial Law Review

The new value exception to the Chapter 11 absolute priority rule provides a narrow avenue for equity holders to retain an equity interest in a reorganized company over the objections of senior creditors and interest holders. With the increasing number of Chapter 11 reorganization filings by private equity owned companies, private equity firms may be interested in exploring ways to retain their equity ownership in the debtor company. This Note explores the unique implications a private equity firm may encounter when attempting to utilize the new value exception as a last resort to maintain ownership in a debtor company. Part ...


The Implied Waiver Solution To The Problem Of Privilege In The Individual Bankruptcy Case, Laura B. Bartell Jan 2003

The Implied Waiver Solution To The Problem Of Privilege In The Individual Bankruptcy Case, Laura B. Bartell

Law Faculty Research Publications

No abstract provided.


The New Textualism And The Rule Of Law Subtext In The Supreme Court's Bankruptcy Jurisprudence, Alan Schwartz Jan 2000

The New Textualism And The Rule Of Law Subtext In The Supreme Court's Bankruptcy Jurisprudence, Alan Schwartz

NYLS Law Review

The Supreme Court is thought to use a method of statutory interpretation called "the new textualism" when construing Federal Statutes, including the Bankruptcy Code. The new textualism, in brief, ties interpreters more closely to the text than more traditional interpretative methods. This Essay inquires into the justifications for the new textualism, but its primary goal is to argue that the Court prefers an important justification of this interpretative method to the method itself. The justification holds that interpretation should advance the rule of law virtues of certainty and predictability. A court that is committed to the new textualism would construe ...


Erisa And The Bankruptcy Code: Stepping Into Quicksand Or Something Else, Post Mackey, Maria A. Di Pippo, Gerald P. Wolf Jan 1992

Erisa And The Bankruptcy Code: Stepping Into Quicksand Or Something Else, Post Mackey, Maria A. Di Pippo, Gerald P. Wolf

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


Absolute Priority And New Value, James J. White Jan 1991

Absolute Priority And New Value, James J. White

Articles

This paper is based on a lecture given on December 6, 1990 ast the Second Annual Robert E. Krinock Lecture. The absolute priority rule is a specific application of the broader doctrine that reorganization plans must be "fair and equitable." Both have their origins in the railroad reorganization cases of the early 20th century. The general doctrine is now codified in section 1129(b)(2) of the Bankruptcy Code and the rule is codified in subsection 1129(b)(2)(B)(ii) which provides that the debtor must pay a nonconsenting class of unsecured creditors in full or "the holder of ...


The Bildisco Case And The Congressional Response, James J. White Jan 1984

The Bildisco Case And The Congressional Response, James J. White

Articles

Section 365 of the Bankruptcy Reform Act authorizes one in bankruptcy to "assume or reject any executory contract ...of the debtor." The most frequent use of the section arises when a lessee goes into Chapter 11 and decides either to reject its real estate lease with its lessor or, if the lease is at a favorable rental rate, to assume it and assign it to another. A less frequent but more controversial use of section 365 is to reject one's collective bargaining agreement with his employees.


Insurance Policies As Assets In Bankruptcy, Evans Holbrook Jan 1918

Insurance Policies As Assets In Bankruptcy, Evans Holbrook

Articles

The Supreme Court of the United States, in the recent case of Cohen v. Samuels, 38 Sup. Ct. 36, has put an end to a method, approved by some of the lower Federal Courts, whereby a person could create a fund which would be completely under his control but which would nevertheless be protected against any claim on the part of his trustee in bankruptcy. The circumstances in the principal case were as follows: Samuels had taken out ordinary life insurance policies, with the usual provisions as to loan and surrender values, payable to certain of his relatives as beneficiaries ...


When Is A Preferential Transfer Required To Be Recorded?, Evans Holbrook Jan 1916

When Is A Preferential Transfer Required To Be Recorded?, Evans Holbrook

Articles

In the recent case of Carey v. Donohue, 36 Sup. Ct. 386, the Supreme Court of the United States has passed on a question that has for years been vexing the Circuit Courts of Appeals, namely: When is the recording of a preferential transfer "required" under § 60 of the'Bankruptcy Act of 1898 as amended in 1903 and 1910. § 60a (as amended in 1903) defines a preference as a transaction by which property of an insolvent debtor is transferred, within four months before his bankruptcy, in such a way that the debt owing to one of his creditors will be ...


Discharge In Bankruptcy Of Principal's Inchoate Obligation To Indemnify His Surety, Evans Holbrook Jan 1915

Discharge In Bankruptcy Of Principal's Inchoate Obligation To Indemnify His Surety, Evans Holbrook

Articles

In the recent case of R. P. Williams, et al. v. United States Fidelity and Guaranty Company, 35 Sup. Ct. 289, the United States Supreme Court has at last passed upon a question that has vexed the courts ever since the enactment of the Bankruptcy Act of 1898. As stated by the Supreme Court, the question is this: "Does a discharge in bankruptcy acquit an express obligation of the principal to indemnify his surety against loss by reason of their joint bond conditioned to secure his faithful performance of a building contract broken prior to the bankruptcy when the surety ...


Depositors' Checks In Payment Of Matured Obligations Held By Drawee Bank As Preferences, Ralph W. Aigler Jan 1913

Depositors' Checks In Payment Of Matured Obligations Held By Drawee Bank As Preferences, Ralph W. Aigler

Articles

Since the case of New York County Bank I. Massey, 192 U. S. 138, there has been no doubt as to the right of a debtor of a bankrupt's estate to exercise the right of set-off as preserved by § 68a of the Bankruptcy Act. In that case it was laid down dearly that such right of set-off may be exercised despite the provisions of § 60a, which covers the matter of preferences. The question very frequently arises when bankers apply deposit balances upon matured obligations of customers. If such application is made within four months of the time when the ...