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Full-Text Articles in Law

Comments On Executive Ruilemaking And Democratic Legitimacy: "Reform" In The United States And The United Kingdom's Brexit Bt Susan Rose-Ackerman, Nicholas Almendares Apr 2020

Comments On Executive Ruilemaking And Democratic Legitimacy: "Reform" In The United States And The United Kingdom's Brexit Bt Susan Rose-Ackerman, Nicholas Almendares

Chicago-Kent Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Deliberative Dimensions Of Modern Environmental Assessment Law, Jocelyn Stacey Jan 2020

The Deliberative Dimensions Of Modern Environmental Assessment Law, Jocelyn Stacey

All Faculty Publications

Environmental assessment (EA) is a cornerstone of environmental law. It provides a legal framework for public decision making about major development projects with implications for environmental protection and the rights and title of Indigenous peoples. Despite significant literature supporting deliberation as the preferred mode of engagement with those affected by EA decisions, the specific legal demands of EA legislation remain undeveloped. This article suggests a legal foundation for deliberative environmental assessment. It argues that modern environmental assessment can be understood through three public law frames: procedural fairness, public inquiry, and framework for the duty to consult and accommodate. It further ...


Brief Of Amici Curiae 116 Law Librarians And 5 Law Library Organizations In Support Of Respondent, Georgia V. Public.Resource.Org, Inc., No. 18-1150 (U.S. Oct. 16, 2019), Michelle M. Wu Oct 2019

Brief Of Amici Curiae 116 Law Librarians And 5 Law Library Organizations In Support Of Respondent, Georgia V. Public.Resource.Org, Inc., No. 18-1150 (U.S. Oct. 16, 2019), Michelle M. Wu

U.S. Supreme Court Briefs

Due process and the rule of law require that the public has meaningful access to “the law.” Every major modern society since the Greeks has recognized the importance of this principle. Roscoe Pound, Theories of the Law, 22 Yale L.J. 114, 117 (1912).

In the United States, “the law” largely comes from appellate courts, legislatures, and administrative agencies who have been granted rule-making authority. As every first year law student learns, those law-making bodies have developed highly specific methods for communicating their pronouncements of law through official publications, such as the Official Code of Georgia Annotated (“OCGA”).

Those specific ...


Executive Rulemaking And Democratic Legitimacy: "Reform" In The United States And The United Kingdom's Route To Brexit, Susan Rose-Ackerman May 2019

Executive Rulemaking And Democratic Legitimacy: "Reform" In The United States And The United Kingdom's Route To Brexit, Susan Rose-Ackerman

Chicago-Kent Law Review

Established public law principles are under strain from the prospect of Brexit in the United Kingdom and the Trump Administration in the United States. In the United Kingdom the Parliament is playing an increasingly important role in overseeing the Government, and the judiciary is beginning to support democratic accountability in executive policymaking. In the United States, possible statutory changes and the power of the president to reshape the public administration are of concern. Although in the United States the most draconian measures will likely die with the return of the House to Democratic Party control, they may remain on the ...


Foreword (Public Law), Paul Craig Jan 2019

Foreword (Public Law), Paul Craig

Articles by Maurer Faculty

No abstract provided.


How The War On Terror Is Transforming Private U.S. Law, Maryam Jamshidi Jan 2018

How The War On Terror Is Transforming Private U.S. Law, Maryam Jamshidi

Washington University Law Review

In thinking about the War on Terror’s impact on U.S. law, what most likely comes to mind are its corrosive effects on public law, including criminal law, immigration, and constitutional law. What is less appreciated is whether and how the fight against terrorism has also impacted private law. As this Article demonstrates, the War on Terror has had a negative influence on private law, specifically on torts, where it has upended long-standing norms, much as it has done in the public law context.

Case law construing the private right of action under the Antiterrorism Act of 1992, 18 ...


La Méthode Comparative En Droit Public, Elisabeth Zoller Jan 2018

La Méthode Comparative En Droit Public, Elisabeth Zoller

Articles by Maurer Faculty

No abstract provided.


Regulating Extraterritoriality: New Frontiers In Public Law, Danielle Ireland-Piper May 2015

Regulating Extraterritoriality: New Frontiers In Public Law, Danielle Ireland-Piper

Danielle Ireland-Piper

No abstract provided.


Public Law In A Comparative And Inter-Disciplinary Paradigm, Danielle Ireland-Piper May 2015

Public Law In A Comparative And Inter-Disciplinary Paradigm, Danielle Ireland-Piper

Danielle Ireland-Piper

No abstract provided.


Comparative Legal Traditions: Text, Materials, And Cases On Western Law. 3rd Edition., Paolo Carozza, Mary Glendon, Colin Picker Apr 2015

Comparative Legal Traditions: Text, Materials, And Cases On Western Law. 3rd Edition., Paolo Carozza, Mary Glendon, Colin Picker

Paolo G. Carozza

This new edition includes some significant revisions since the last edition was published in 1994. The new edition includes: A greater emphasis on Public Law in the Continental and Common law traditions; More coverage of the impact of the regional European law (EC EU and ECHR) on the legal traditions;Some updated Problems (including one concerning Mixed Jurisdictions); and Numerous updates to the Common Law Tradition materials in light of the many significant reforms in England over the last ten years.


Políticas Públicas De Fomento A La Competencia, Camilo Ossa Mar 2015

Políticas Públicas De Fomento A La Competencia, Camilo Ossa

Camilo Ossa

In this paper you will find a description related to the constitutional framework that enables the state to intervene in the economy, in order to disaggregate the support on which is built on competition law in Colombia, without neglecting the crucial role economic regulation plays in maintaining the economic and social order, becoming interested more to discover the public policy of the State in this matter, according to the theoretical precepts that teach how the construction and implementation of public policy and the subsequent assessment of the rules of competition law to determine which state, according to the theoretical postulates ...


Deployment Of Geoengineering By The Private And Public Sector: Can The Risks Of Geoengineering Ever Be Effectively Regulated?, Daniela E. Lai Jan 2015

Deployment Of Geoengineering By The Private And Public Sector: Can The Risks Of Geoengineering Ever Be Effectively Regulated?, Daniela E. Lai

Daniela E Lai

Geoengineering has been described as any large-scale environmental manipulation designed with the purpose of mitigating the effects of climate change without decreasing greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs). Currently there are no specific rules regulating geoengineering activities particularly if geoengineering is deployed in areas beyond national jurisdiction. This article argues that, in order to mitigate the risks of geoengineering, there needs to be effective regulation of its deployment both in international and domestic law. The risks of geoengineering can only be effectively regulated if there is international cooperation between all levels of governments and private individuals involved in the research and development ...


Nuclear Chain Reaction: Why Economic Sanctions Are Not Worth The Public Costs, Nicholas C.W. Wolfe Sep 2014

Nuclear Chain Reaction: Why Economic Sanctions Are Not Worth The Public Costs, Nicholas C.W. Wolfe

Nicholas A Wolfe

International economic sanctions frequently violate human rights in targeted states and rarely achieve their objectives. However, many hail economic sanctions as an important nonviolent tool for coercing and persuading change. In November 2013, the Islamic Republic of Iran negotiated a temporary agreement with major world powers regarding Iran’s nuclear program. The United States’ media and politicians have repeatedly and incorrectly attributed Iran’s willingness to negotiate to the effectiveness of economic sanctions.

Politicians primarily focus on immediate domestic effects and enact sanctions without a thorough understanding of the long-term effects on the United States economy and the public within ...


Planting Seeds Of Order: How The State Can Create, Shape, And Use Customary Law, Bryan H. Druzin Dec 2013

Planting Seeds Of Order: How The State Can Create, Shape, And Use Customary Law, Bryan H. Druzin

Bryan H. Druzin

This paper argues that government can strategically trigger the emergence of customary law in order to achieve specific policy ends. While much has been written on customary law, the idea that the State can stimulate its emergence is a radical notion with clear policy implications. Harnessed correctly, such an approach could be a powerful legislative weapon to create, sustain, and even redirect social order. Building upon basic insights from game theory, the paper posits a way to do this: policymakers can deliberately recreate the social conditions that foster the emergence of customary order. The paper, however, draws a sharp divide ...


Fundamentos De La Aplicación Pública Del Derecho De La Competencia, Camilo Ossa Oct 2013

Fundamentos De La Aplicación Pública Del Derecho De La Competencia, Camilo Ossa

Camilo Ossa

This paper aims to focus attention on one of the essential aspects of antitrust law in Colombia, like its public enforcement, or in other words, the power of the State, delegated by law to the Superintendency of Industry and Commerce as the national authority on competition-this according to the provisions of article 6 of Law 1340 of 2009 - to advance administrative investigations aimed to punish those people, natural or legal entities that violate the provisions of the relevant legislation in order to safeguard rights such as freedom of competition, efficiency in markets, free enterprise, economic freedom and ultimately to consumers.


The Cosmopolitan Turn In Constitutionalism: An Integrated Conception Of Public Law, Mattias Kumm Jul 2013

The Cosmopolitan Turn In Constitutionalism: An Integrated Conception Of Public Law, Mattias Kumm

Indiana Journal of Global Legal Studies

If the point of constitutionalism is to define the legal framework within which collective self-government can legitimately take place, constitutionalism has to take a cosmopolitan turn: it has to occupy itself with the global legitimacy conditions for the exercise of state sovereignty. Contrary to widely made implicit assumptions in constitutional theory and practice, constitutional legitimacy is not self-standing. Whether a national constitution and the political practices authorized by it are legitimate does not depend only on the appropriate democratic quality and rights-respecting nature of domestic legal practices. Instead, national constitutional legitimacy depends, in part, on how the national constitution is ...


One Redeeming Quality About The 112th Congress: Refocusing On Descriptive Rather Than Evocative Short Titles, Brian Christopher Jones Jun 2013

One Redeeming Quality About The 112th Congress: Refocusing On Descriptive Rather Than Evocative Short Titles, Brian Christopher Jones

Brian Christopher Jones

For all intents and purposes the 112th Congress has been deemed a massive failure by most; fewer laws enacted and contemptuous debates characterized the session’s most lambasted qualities. However, one redeemable aspect was present: a focus back on descriptive and technical words for short titles, rather than evocative or tendentious terms. When compared to the 111th Congress, the use of evocative words slowed while the use of technical terms increased. This is the first time this has happened since the 101st-102nd Congress (1989-1993). Additionally, it is the largest separation between technical and evocative words since the 103rd Congress (1993-1995 ...


Dual Standards For Third-Party Intervenors: Distinguishing Between Public-Law And Private-Law Intervention, Justin P. Gunter Mar 2013

Dual Standards For Third-Party Intervenors: Distinguishing Between Public-Law And Private-Law Intervention, Justin P. Gunter

Vanderbilt Law Review

Courts stand as the final arbiters of many important and controversial issues in the United States. While it is the province of the judicial branch to hear "cases" and "controversies" that impact the immediate parties to a suit, many modern suits impact unrepresented parties and thus have policy implications. To describe this phenomenon, scholars use the terms "private law" and "public law." As public law gained greater prominence, commentators began to realize the need to revise the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure to facilitate this type of litigation. Historically, unrepresented parties who were affected by a suit could use the ...


Wireless Localism: Beyond The Shroud Of Objectivity In Federal Spectrum Administration, Olivier Sylvain Jan 2013

Wireless Localism: Beyond The Shroud Of Objectivity In Federal Spectrum Administration, Olivier Sylvain

Faculty Scholarship

Recent innovations in mobile wireless technology have instigated a debate between two camps of legal scholars about how policymakers should structure federal administration of the electromagnetic spectrum. The first argues that the Federal Communications Commission should define spectrum use rights more clearly and give spectrum licensees near fee-simple property rights in frequencies that they can use and sell in secondary markets as they wish. The second camp argues that, rather than award exclusive licenses to the highest bidder, the FCC ought to open much if not most of the spectrum to unlicensed use by smartphones and tablets equipped with the ...


Managerial Judging And Substantive Law, Tobias Barrington Wolff Jan 2013

Managerial Judging And Substantive Law, Tobias Barrington Wolff

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

The figure of the proactive jurist, involved in case management from the outset of the litigation and attentive throughout the proceedings to the impact of her decisions on settlement dynamics -- a managerial judge -- has displaced the passive umpire as the dominant paradigm in the federal district courts. Thus far, discussions of managerial judging have focused primarily upon values endogenous to the practice of judging. Procedural scholarship has paid little attention to the impact of the underlying substantive law on the parameters and conduct of complex proceedings.

In this Article, I examine the interface between substantive law and managerial judging. The ...


The (Re-) Constitution Of The Public, Gianluigi Palombella Jan 2012

The (Re-) Constitution Of The Public, Gianluigi Palombella

Gianluigi Palombella

This article deals with the prospect of public law in global governance. It analyses firstly the foundations of modern public law and considers what is left of them in the global setting. Are they still holding through States’ de-centering practices, detached from the legitimating grounds of the modern ‘idea of publicness’? What is called here the duality of public law (in its State-related political and juridical strands) fades and decouples in the sphere where inherently ‘global’ legalities originate of a deracinated type: the distinctively global ‘public’ only provides a ‘suspended public law’ and politically unsaturated. The Constitution of the Public ...


A Tale Of Two Maps: The Limits Of Universalism In Comparative Judicial Review, Adam M. Dodek Apr 2009

A Tale Of Two Maps: The Limits Of Universalism In Comparative Judicial Review, Adam M. Dodek

Osgoode Hall Law Journal

For most of the twentieth century, the dominant paradigm in comparative public law was particularism. This was accompanied by a strong skepticism towards universalist features and possibilities in public law and, especially, constitutional law. With the rise of judicial review after World War I--and especially in Eastern Europe after the collapse of the Soviet Union--comparative judicial review has begun to flourish. However, comparative scholarship on judicial review overemphasizes the centrality of "the question of legitimacy" of judicial review in a democratic polity. This has been a result of the mistaken extrapolation of the American debate over judicial review to other ...


Executions, Deterrence And Homicide: A Tale Of Two Cities, Franklin E. Zimring, Jeffrey Fagan, David T. Johnson Dec 2008

Executions, Deterrence And Homicide: A Tale Of Two Cities, Franklin E. Zimring, Jeffrey Fagan, David T. Johnson

Franklin E. Zimring

We compare homicide rates in two quite similar cities with vastly different execution risks. Singapore had an execution rate close to 1 per million per year until an explosive twentyfold increase in 1994-95 and 96 to a level that we show was probably the highest in the world. Then over the next 11 years, Singapore executions dropped by about 95%. Hong Kong, by contrast, has no executions all during the last generation and abolished capital punishment in 1993. Homicide levels and trends are remarkably similar in these two cities over the 35 years after 1973, with neither the surge in ...


Public Law As The Law Of The Res Publica, Elisabeth Zoller Jan 2008

Public Law As The Law Of The Res Publica, Elisabeth Zoller

Articles by Maurer Faculty

No abstract provided.


Boldly Going Where No Law Has Gone Before: Call Centres, Intake Scripts, Database Fields, And Discretionary Justice In Social Assistance, Lorne Sossin Jul 2004

Boldly Going Where No Law Has Gone Before: Call Centres, Intake Scripts, Database Fields, And Discretionary Justice In Social Assistance, Lorne Sossin

Osgoode Hall Law Journal

This article focuses on the response of public law to bureaucratic disentitlement. Whether eligibility decisions for social welfare benefits are made on the basis of a face to face interview or telephone intake screening at a call centre, whether the questions are onerous for vulnerable applicants to answer, whether the bureaucratic hurdles can reasonably be surmounted or lead to the de facto exclusion of otherwise eligible applicants, all constitute questions which should be fundamentally intertwined with the question of whether a discretionary decision is legally valid. This is so not only because service delivery models and administrative design may determine ...


Book Review. From Anarchy To Allottopia, David P. Fidler Jan 2004

Book Review. From Anarchy To Allottopia, David P. Fidler

Articles by Maurer Faculty

No abstract provided.


Reconceptualizing Criminal Law Defenses, Victoria Nourse Jan 2003

Reconceptualizing Criminal Law Defenses, Victoria Nourse

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

In 1933, one of the leading theorists of the criminal law, Jerome Michael, wrote openly of the criminal law "as an instrument of the state." Today, criminal law is largely allergic to claims of political theory; commentators obsess about theories of deterrence and retribution, and the technical details of model codes and sentencing grids, but rarely speak of institutional effects or political commitments. In this article, the author aims to change that emphasis and to examine the criminal law as a tool for governance. Her approach is explicitly constructive: it accepts the criminal law that we have, places it in ...


Intervention In Public Law Litigation: The Environmental Paradigm, Peter A. Appel Jan 2000

Intervention In Public Law Litigation: The Environmental Paradigm, Peter A. Appel

Washington University Law Review

This Article consists of four parts. Part I explores the theoretical development of public law litigation, with a particular focus on the overlooked role that environmental litigation and its peculiarities should play in this thinking. Part II examines the history and development of intervention as a procedural device, and then outlines how it presently functions in public law cases. Part III then examines the interrelated claims that federal courts generally have been too stingy with potential intervenors and that an increased role for intervenors necessarily benefits public law litigation. The best case that supporters of a broader right of intervention ...


A Reply To Professor Tobias, Peter A. Appel Jan 2000

A Reply To Professor Tobias, Peter A. Appel

Washington University Law Review

Professor Tobias finds four primary faults with my account. First, he believes that I rely too heavily on impressionistic and anecdotal data in formulating my conclusions, although he recognizes that all analyses of intervention— his own included— suffer from the same fault. Second, he argues that my article and other considerations of this area would benefit from “a more refined understanding of modern environmental litigation.” Third, Professor Tobias expresses doubt about the wisdom of my prescriptions for improving intervention, particularly with my argument that courts of appeals should review intervention denials under an abuse of discretion standard rather than de ...


Rethinking Intervention In Environmental Litigation, Carl Tobias Jan 2000

Rethinking Intervention In Environmental Litigation, Carl Tobias

Washington University Law Review

Intervention in Public Law Litigation: The Environmental Paradigm (Environmental Paradigm) substantially enhances understanding of intervention in federal environmental disputes. These controversies are a critical type of modern civil lawsuit and perhaps constitute the quintessential form of public law litigation. Professor Peter Appel comprehensively reviews the lengthy history of the intervention mechanism, scrutinizes the substantial 1966 revision of Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 24, and closely examines the phenomenon of public law litigation and intervention in it. Professor Appel, thus, significantly advances the dialogue about public law cases and intervention in them and much that he states is undisputed. Nevertheless, certain ...