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Full-Text Articles in Education

The Everydayness Of Instructional Design And The Pursuit Of Quality In Online Courses, Jason K. Mcdonald Jun 2023

The Everydayness Of Instructional Design And The Pursuit Of Quality In Online Courses, Jason K. Mcdonald

Faculty Publications

This article reports research into the everydayness of instructional design (meaning designers’ daily routines, run-of-the-mill interactions with colleagues, and other, prosaic forms of social contact), and how everydayness relates to their pursuit of quality in online course design. These issues were investigated through an ethnographic case study, centered on a team of instructional designers at a university in the United States. Designers were observed spending significant amounts of time engaged in practices of course refinement, meaning mundane, workaday tasks like revising, updating, fine-tuning, or fixing the courses to which they were assigned. Refining practices were interrelated with, but also experienced …


A Qualitative Exploration Of The Motivations And Expectations Of Lecturers Who Sign-Up To Participate In An Emotional Intelligence Coaching Programme, Eoghan Guiry, Aiden Carthy Nov 2022

A Qualitative Exploration Of The Motivations And Expectations Of Lecturers Who Sign-Up To Participate In An Emotional Intelligence Coaching Programme, Eoghan Guiry, Aiden Carthy

Articles

Research has emphasised the importance of emotional intelligence (EI) in the work of higher education staff. However, little is about the motivations and expectations of lecturers who decide to participate in EI coaching programmes. As part of a larger study pertaining to the efficacy of EI coaching for Irish higher education lecturers, qualitative data was collected by way of a questionnaire that contained two open-ended questions from all participants who signed up for coaching (N = 40). The findings indicate that the primary motivations for participants to sign-up for coaching were personal development and a desire to support research activities. …


Institutional Responses To The Covid-19 Pandemic: Faculty And Administrator Experiences, Narketta Sparkman-Key, Tammi F. Dice, Alexandra C. Gantt Jan 2021

Institutional Responses To The Covid-19 Pandemic: Faculty And Administrator Experiences, Narketta Sparkman-Key, Tammi F. Dice, Alexandra C. Gantt

Counseling & Human Services Faculty Publications

The onset of the COVID-19 pandemic required shifts in operations for institutions of higher education everywhere. Faculty and administrators were asked to adapt to meet the needs of students. We conducted a qualitative content analysis to understand institutional responses and examine the experiences of faculty and administrators during the COVID-19 pandemic through the lens of chaos theory. Institutional responses to the pandemic varied. Participants identified supports and resources deemed helpful, as well as those found to be inadequate or unwanted. We also found that the pandemic resulted in some positive outcomes for faculty and administrators, which led to growth in …


What Prompts College Students To Participate In Online Surveys?, Kunsoon Park, Narang Park, Wookjae Heo, Kim Gustafson Jan 2019

What Prompts College Students To Participate In Online Surveys?, Kunsoon Park, Narang Park, Wookjae Heo, Kim Gustafson

Consumer Sciences Faculty Publications

Online surveys are frequently used in higher education to collect students’ opinions. This study investigated the factors associated with students’ willingness to respond to online surveys. Using 540 samples from undergraduate and graduate students in the United States, this study conducted a factor analysis to categorize the reasons that students willingly participate in online surveys. Four factors were identified: Format, Affiliation, Content, and Contact. The regression analysis revealed format was significantly associated with the undergraduate students’ online survey participation, while content was significantly related to the graduate students’ online survey participation. These findings indicate the behavior of responding to online …


Ace Your Course Challenge Survey Instruments, Holly J. Swanson, Eric Kaldor Phd, Joshua Caulkins Jan 2018

Ace Your Course Challenge Survey Instruments, Holly J. Swanson, Eric Kaldor Phd, Joshua Caulkins

ATL Surveys

The Ace Your Course (AYC) Challenge is a series of reflective surveys intended to extend students’ evaluation of metacognitive learning strategies, based on the work of Dr. Saundra McGuire. The survey questions used for different stages of the Challenge can be found here. These surveys were developed as part of an initiative from the Office for the Advancement of Teaching and Learning and through collaboration with the Academic Enhancement Center to support the development of self-regulated learning through student reflection on metacognition.


Environmental Mental Models Of College Students, Melissa R. Wuellner, Leslie Vincent, Brandi Felts Feb 2017

Environmental Mental Models Of College Students, Melissa R. Wuellner, Leslie Vincent, Brandi Felts

Natural Resource Management Faculty Publications

Primary and secondary students in the United States are provided environmental education in their curricula due in part to national legislation, but higher education, for many U.S. citizens, is the last opportunity to educate young adults about the environment and humans’ role in it in a formalized setting. Pre-college education and other life experiences or ways of learning can shape a student’s mental model of the environment. While some previous research has focused on understanding environmental mental models of primary and secondary students, only one study to date has evaluated models of college students. Further, no study has evaluated potential …


A Study Of The Academic And Personal Impacts Of A Literacy Intervention Course: Stories From Stakeholders, Jeremy Ray Logsdon Jul 2016

A Study Of The Academic And Personal Impacts Of A Literacy Intervention Course: Stories From Stakeholders, Jeremy Ray Logsdon

Dissertations

This study aims to illuminate, via the qualitative method of portraiture, the academic and personal impacts of both faculty and student stakeholders of a literacy intervention course, offered as an alternative to the traditional developmental reading model, taught at a regional southeastern United States four-year public university. Students who enrolled in the course from the semesters of fall 2012 to fall 2015 were given the opportunity to complete a survey about their experiences with the literacy intervention course. Faculty stakeholders were interviewed for their perspective on course creation, implementation, and delivery, focusing on the six curricular core competencies of reading …


An Instrument Validation For A Three-Dimensional Worldview Survey Among Undergraduate Christian University Students Using Principal Components Analysis, Kathy Morales Jul 2013

An Instrument Validation For A Three-Dimensional Worldview Survey Among Undergraduate Christian University Students Using Principal Components Analysis, Kathy Morales

Doctoral Dissertations and Projects

This quantitative study examined the structure, validity, and reliability of the Three-Dimensional Worldview Survey-Form C (3DWS-Form C) for potential use in postsecondary Christian institutions. This instrument delineates from other worldview instruments in that it purports to measure three components of a person's worldview: propositions, behaviors, and heart-orientation. Principal components analysis (PCA) was used to examine the underlying component structure and construct validity of the instrument. Cronbach's alpha and the Spearman-Brown prophecy formula were used to assess the internal consistency and reliability of the instrument. Participants were first-year university students attending a large Christian university in Virginia. Results of the study …


A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Study Of Non-Completers In Online Doctor Of Education Programs, Bernadette Wyman Jan 2013

A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Study Of Non-Completers In Online Doctor Of Education Programs, Bernadette Wyman

Doctoral Dissertations and Projects

The chance of an individual completing a traditional doctorate program is 50% (Bowen & Rudenstine, 1992; Council of Graduate Schools Ph.D. Completion Project, 2008; Ivankova & Stick, 2007). Student attrition in online programs is 10% to 20% greater than that of traditional, residential programs (Allen & Seaman, 2010; Carr, 2000; Diaz, 2000; DiRamio & Wolverton, 2006; Parker, 1999; Rovai, 2002). While doctoral attrition rates have been examined for decades, little research focuses on the phenomenon of attrition with doctoral candidates who enrolled in online graduate programs (Perry, Boman, Care, Edwards & Park, 2008). The phenomenon of attrition is multifaceted and …


"Ok, I'M A Teacher Now:" Reading Young Adult Literature In A Teacher Education Program, Brittany Richer Apr 2012

"Ok, I'M A Teacher Now:" Reading Young Adult Literature In A Teacher Education Program, Brittany Richer

Honors Projects

After taking a young adult literature course as part of my Secondary Education/ English program, I felt I had gained only a limited understanding of the importance of the genre to my future career. In the class, we read several popular young adult texts, learned about their authors, identified censorship issues, and mentioned a few strategies related to the teaching of the texts. Much of the “understanding” related only to future applications in imagined classrooms, which left no room for critical reflection about what we might learn from reading the texts about ourselves as students and teachers. A sense of …


Contentious Conversations, Leah A. Zuidema Sep 2011

Contentious Conversations, Leah A. Zuidema

Faculty Work Comprehensive List

The idea of joining a conversation through reading and writing is not new; in his 1941 book "The Philosophy of Literary Form: Studies in Symbolic Action," Kenneth Burke suggests that the acts of reading and writing are like entering a parlor where others are already conversing. The author explores the place of professional debate within NCTE and in the pages of "English Journal". Regardless, by reading these pages, one is entering into a conversation that is already underway.


Openness As Catalyst For An Educational Reformation, David Wiley Jul 2010

Openness As Catalyst For An Educational Reformation, David Wiley

Faculty Publications

The word open is receiving a lot of attention in education circles. Openness in higher education has been discussed recently by writers in the Chronicle of Higher Education, the New York Times, EDUCAUSE Review, and EQ, among other publications. In January 2010, The Horizon Report, produced by the New Media Consortium (NMC) and the EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative (ELI), declared that open content will “reach mainstream use” in higher education within the next twelve months. But what does that mean? What is this open we keep hearing about?


The Future Of Natural Selection Knowledge Measurement: A Reply To Anderson Et Al. (2010), Ross Nehm, Irvin Sam Schonfeld Jan 2010

The Future Of Natural Selection Knowledge Measurement: A Reply To Anderson Et Al. (2010), Ross Nehm, Irvin Sam Schonfeld

Publications and Research

The development of rich, reliable, and robust measures of the composition, structure, and stability of student thinking about core scientific ideas (such as natural selection) remains a complex challenge facing science educators. In their recent article (Nehm & Schonfeld 2008), the authors explored the strengths, weaknesses, and insights provided by a detailed exploration of three commonly used measures of student thinking about natural selection in a large sample of underrepresented minority students. One of their core findings was that all of the tools they studied--including the CINS--have strengths and weaknesses that must be carefully taken into consideration by those …


Openness, Dynamic Specialization, And The Disaggregated Future Of Higher Education, John L. Hilton Iii, David Wiley Nov 2009

Openness, Dynamic Specialization, And The Disaggregated Future Of Higher Education, John L. Hilton Iii, David Wiley

Faculty Publications

Openness is a fundamental value underlying significant changes in society and is a prerequisite to changes institutions of higher education need to make in order to remain relevant to the society in which they exist. There are a number of ways institutions can be more open, including programs of open sharing of educational materials. Individual faculty can also choose to be more open without waiting for institutional programs. Increasing degrees of openness in society coupled with innovations in business strategy like dynamic specialization are enabling radical experiments in higher education and exerting increasing competitive pressure on conventional higher education institutions. …


Measuring Knowledge Of Natural Selection: A Comparison Of The C.I.N.S., An Open-Response Instrument, And An Oral Interview, Ross Nehm, Irvin Sam Schonfeld Jan 2008

Measuring Knowledge Of Natural Selection: A Comparison Of The C.I.N.S., An Open-Response Instrument, And An Oral Interview, Ross Nehm, Irvin Sam Schonfeld

Publications and Research

Growing recognition of the central importance of fostering an in-depth understanding of natural selection has, surprisingly, failed to stimulate work on the development and rigorous evaluation of instruments that measure knowledge of it. We used three different methodological tools, the Conceptual Inventory of Natural Selection (CINS), a modified version of Bishop and Anderson's (Bishop and Anderson [1990] Journal of Research in Science Teaching 27: 415-427) open-response test that we call the Open Response Instrument (ORI), and an oral interview derived from both instruments, to measure biology majors' understanding of and alternative conceptions about natural selection. We explored how these instruments …


Evolving Learning: Educators’ Inner Experiences Of Engaging In Service-Learning With Undergraduates, Cara Meixner Jan 2008

Evolving Learning: Educators’ Inner Experiences Of Engaging In Service-Learning With Undergraduates, Cara Meixner

Antioch University Full-Text Dissertations & Theses

Evolving Learning: Educators’ Inner Experiences of Engaging in Service-Learning with Undergraduates is an exploratory, qualitative study of faculty members’ learning, growth, and development in service-learning contexts. Through two, interwoven forms of constructivist grounded theory – situational mapping and dimensional analysis – this dissertation brought voice to a once ‘private’ perspective, making explicit what all is happening as participants make meaning of their experiences engaging in service-learning with college students. A three-phased series of recursive, comparative interviews and concurrent analysis resulted in the development of a grounded theory best captured by a core, organizing perspective – evolving learning. This perspective is …


Evaluating The Impact On Users From Implementing A Course Management System, Charles R. Graham, Meghan M. Kennedy, Gregory L. Waddoups, Richard E. West Feb 2007

Evaluating The Impact On Users From Implementing A Course Management System, Charles R. Graham, Meghan M. Kennedy, Gregory L. Waddoups, Richard E. West

Faculty Publications

Nearly all colleges and universities are using some form of e-learning system, usually an expensive course management system (CMS), to create online course offerings or to enhance regular, classroom-oriented courses. Our university has invested a large amount of resources into purchasing and supporting one of the two most popular CMS vendors, and it has become imperative to understand what the effects from using this technology have been, as well as how we can improve the integration of this and other educational technologies into different instructional contexts. This project, through a combination of surveys, call-log analysis, and interviews, was used to …


Good (Best) Practices For Electronically Offered Degree And Certificate Programs, Scott L. Howell, Katherine Baker Jan 2006

Good (Best) Practices For Electronically Offered Degree And Certificate Programs, Scott L. Howell, Katherine Baker

Faculty Publications

Who would have ever imagined the effect of one set of distance education principles developed 10 years ago (1995)? At a time in the history of distance- and e-learning, when many associations, organizations, and institutions set about to define themselves and those standards by which their constituents would be held accountable for quality practices, one set of standards has emerged preeminent the work of the Western Cooperative of Educational Telecommunications known as Best Practices for Electronically Offered Degree and Certificate Programs. Even Though the original 17 principles enumerated in 1995 have evolved to 27 in 2005, all institutions of higher …