Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Education Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Series

Life Sciences

Nebraska

1988

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Education

G88-869 Daylilies, Debra Schwarze Jan 1988

G88-869 Daylilies, Debra Schwarze

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This guide offers hints on growing daylilies, discusses site selection, varieties, propagation and planting and plant culture.

Daylilies, members of the Liliaceae (lily family), are some of the most tolerant and popular of the garden perennials. Their range in size, color, and use means that there is a daylily for almost everyone.

Like their name Hemerocallis, "beauty for a day", the individual daylily flower lasts only one day. However, a single plant may produce over 50 flowers. This large number of flowers can extend the blooming period of a plant for several weeks. With over 10,000 cultivars available and ...


G88-863 Annual Broadleaf Weed Control In Winter Wheat (Revised January 1990), Gail A. Wicks, Robert N. Klein, Alex Martin Jan 1988

G88-863 Annual Broadleaf Weed Control In Winter Wheat (Revised January 1990), Gail A. Wicks, Robert N. Klein, Alex Martin

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses preventive, cultural, and chemical weed control in winter wheat. Best weed control is obtained by using a combination of these three methods. Winter and summer annual broadleaf weeds are economically important pests of Nebraska winter wheat. They reduce grain yields by competing with winter wheat for water, light and nutrients. Weeds are estimated to reduce Nebraska winter wheat yields 10 percent each year.


G88-876 Ridge Plant Systems: Equipment, Elbert C. Dickey, Paul J. Jasa, Robert N. Klein, Dean E. Eisenhauer, David P. Shelton, Bryn J. Dolesh, John A. Smith Jan 1988

G88-876 Ridge Plant Systems: Equipment, Elbert C. Dickey, Paul J. Jasa, Robert N. Klein, Dean E. Eisenhauer, David P. Shelton, Bryn J. Dolesh, John A. Smith

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Ridge plant systems, ridge cleaning equipment, planter stabilizing attachments, cultivation and ridge management are discussed here. Ridge plant systems are methods of planting crops into a ridge formed during cultivation of the previous crop. Such systems combine tillage and herbicides to control weeds. Weed seed and residue lying on the soil surface are pushed from the ridge to the area between the rows by row-cleaning devices on the planter. Crop seed is planted into the old row in a cleanly tilled strip at an elevation slightly higher than the row middles. A band application of herbicide behind the planter typically ...