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Work, Life, And Community College Faculty: Understanding Community College Work/Life Balance Issues Through Socialization Theory And Academic Discipline, David S. Key Aug 2013

Work, Life, And Community College Faculty: Understanding Community College Work/Life Balance Issues Through Socialization Theory And Academic Discipline, David S. Key

Doctoral Dissertations

Research has established that college faculty at research institutions often struggle to maintain a balance between their personal and professional lives (Drago & Williams, 2000; Mason & Goulden, 2002, 2004; Quinn, 2010; Sorcinelli & Near, 1989; Ward & Wolf-Wendel, 2004). While some work/life research has focused on two-year faculty, the research on community college faculty and work/life balance issues has often proved contradictory (Lester & Bers, 2010; Perna, 2001; Sallee, 2008; Townsend & LaPaglia, 2000; Wolf-Wendel, Ward, & Twombly, 2007). Furthermore, little is known about how community college culture and discipline affect the ability of two-year faculty to balance their professional and personal lives. While many theories of socialization have been utilized to explain faculty work (Bess, 1978; Merton, 1957; Tierney & Rhoads, 1994; Van Maanen & Schein, 1979) and disciplinary culture (Austin, 1990; Becher, 1984, 1987; Biglan, 1973; Clark, 1987; Kuh & Whitt, 1988; Tierney, 1990), this body of literature has not often focused on community college faculty.

The purpose of this study was to gain a greater understanding of community college faculty work/life balance issues. As a result, I sought to gain a greater understanding of how academic socialization affects community college faculty. Furthermore, I ...


Perceptions Of Political, Academic, And Corporate Leaders: Higher Education Accountability In Georgia, Leslie Gene Fout May 2013

Perceptions Of Political, Academic, And Corporate Leaders: Higher Education Accountability In Georgia, Leslie Gene Fout

Doctoral Dissertations

The purpose of this study was to examine Georgia political, academic, and corporate leaders’ perceptions of higher education accountability. A case study design was used to gain in-depth information. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with 23 participants.

The findings of the study included the following:

  1. Nearly every participant believed the mission and purpose higher education involved providing students with the skills and abilities needed to obtain gainful employment, and thereby make a positive impact on the economic development of the state of Georgia.
  2. Approximately half of the participants believed higher education should cultivate an engaged citizenry.
  3. No consensus was ...