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Social and Behavioral Sciences Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

2012

Portland State University

Counseling

Articles 1 - 4 of 4

Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

Twenty-Somethings In The Classroom And Counseling Office: Understanding Emerging Adult Counseling Students, Joel A. Lane Nov 2012

Twenty-Somethings In The Classroom And Counseling Office: Understanding Emerging Adult Counseling Students, Joel A. Lane

Counselor Education Faculty Publications and Presentations

Recent trends in many counseling training programs have reflected a proliferation of students entering graduate school directly after completing an undergraduate program. This proliferation has resulted in an increase in the number of emerging adult counseling students. Emerging adulthood is the term used to describe the ages of 18-25, and is unique in that individuals in this age group identify subjectively with aspects of both adolescence and adulthood without fully identifying with either. Lacking a crystallized adult identity poses unique challenges for these students, particularly with regard to developing professional identity and self-efficacy. While many emerging adults view these challenges ...


Mentoring Counselor Education Doctoral Students To Teach Basic Counseling Skills, Erin E. Binkley, Joel A. Lane, Sarah Eikelberg Oct 2012

Mentoring Counselor Education Doctoral Students To Teach Basic Counseling Skills, Erin E. Binkley, Joel A. Lane, Sarah Eikelberg

Counselor Education Faculty Publications and Presentations

As doctoral students in the field of Counselor Education prepare to become faculty members, engaging in supervised teaching experiences are both helpful and necessary to their development. In this presentation, two doctoral students and one faculty member will discuss their experience with mentoring as a tool for developing skill in teaching. In this mentoring relationship, the two doctoral students co-taught the Basic Counseling Skills course with the faculty member, and were mentored in areas of teaching, supervision, governance, and student evaluation. Experience of the mentoring process and development of teaching skills will be discussed by both the faculty member and ...


A Narrative Conceptualization Of The Imposter Phenomenon: Implications For Supervisors Of Beginning Counselors, Joel A. Lane Mar 2012

A Narrative Conceptualization Of The Imposter Phenomenon: Implications For Supervisors Of Beginning Counselors, Joel A. Lane

Counselor Education Faculty Publications and Presentations

The Imposter Phenomenon, characterized as a sentiment that one is incompetent despite overwhelming contradictory evidence, is perhaps the most significant challenge that counseling students face as they begin their practicum experiences. Individuals experiencing this phenomenon are unable to internalize evidence of their competence. They believe that their successes can be attributed to luck, and feel that fraudulence is the primary reason for their having progressed to the point of the practicum experience. An inability to see one’s counseling abilities as competent can negatively impact his or her work in multiple ways. Supervisors of these counseling students are in a ...


The Ethical Implications Of Bartering For Mental Health Services: Examining Interdisciplinary Ethical Standards, Joel A. Lane Jan 2012

The Ethical Implications Of Bartering For Mental Health Services: Examining Interdisciplinary Ethical Standards, Joel A. Lane

Counselor Education Faculty Publications and Presentations

The present paper discusses literature concerning the practice of bartering for counseling, psychological, or social work services in lieu of traditional monetary payment. The author contrasts the language concerning the practice of bartering found in the respective ethical codes for each profession, and presents literature describing both risks and potential benefits of bartering arrangements. The primary risks of bartering include liability concerns and the potential for harmful or exploitive dual relationships. The primary benefits are that bartering makes mental health services available to those who cannot afford traditional fees, and allows for a culturally relevant compensation method for those whose ...