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Great Plains Quarterly

1993

Articles 1 - 30 of 58

Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

Unplighted Troths: Causes For Divorce In A Frontier Town Toward The End Of The Nineteenth Century, C. Robert Haywood Jan 1993

Unplighted Troths: Causes For Divorce In A Frontier Town Toward The End Of The Nineteenth Century, C. Robert Haywood

Great Plains Quarterly

"W elcome to Dodge City, the biggest, wildest, wickedest little city on the continent," was the exuberant greeting given out-of-town visitors to Dodge's Fourth ofJuly celebration in 1883. The assessment projected was a selfcongratulatory one shared and frequently envied by the rest of the United States. Dodge was enjoying the peak of its cattle-town fame and prosperity as the quintessential frontier boom town, unrestrained by convention, the "very embodiment of waywardness and wantonness." Few communities seemed more at odds with the national social values and mores that later generations would label Victorian. As a mecca for free-spending cowboys it ...


The "Liquid Gold" Rush: Groundwater Irrigation And Law In Nebraska, 1900~93, Sam S. Kepfield Jan 1993

The "Liquid Gold" Rush: Groundwater Irrigation And Law In Nebraska, 1900~93, Sam S. Kepfield

Great Plains Quarterly

Water is power. Water is strength. Water is health. In the Rocky Mountains, it is the most valuable of all assets. Nothing else compares with it, nothing else can compare with it. With it, we can produce trees and forests. With it we can make fertile fields on the desert plains, and make the unsightly and uninviting plateau attractive for agriculture and home-building.1


Lands, Laws, And Women: Decisions Of The General Land Office, 1881~ 1920 A Preliminary Report, Nancy J. Taniguchi Jan 1993

Lands, Laws, And Women: Decisions Of The General Land Office, 1881~ 1920 A Preliminary Report, Nancy J. Taniguchi

Great Plains Quarterly

"S ettlement" of the West-by common understanding-has meant the taking up of the public domain, especially homesteads and preemptions, under federal law. Obviously, "settlement" in this sense has little to do with actual occupation, or the property rights of Native Americans and long-resident Hispanics would not have been so long ignored. The specific process of settling involved three steps: filing a claim, proving up and/or making payment, and obtaining title or ownership. Each of these steps had its pitfalls, which, when they occurred, were usually resolved by the General Land Office (GLO), a division of the Department of the ...


Index To Vol.13 No.4 Jan 1993

Index To Vol.13 No.4

Great Plains Quarterly

No abstract provided.


Great Plains Quarterly: Table Of Contents Fall 1993 Vol. 13 No. 4 Jan 1993

Great Plains Quarterly: Table Of Contents Fall 1993 Vol. 13 No. 4

Great Plains Quarterly

No abstract provided.


Review Of The Changing Image Of The City: Planning For Downtown Omaha, 1945-1973, Harl A. Dalstrom Jan 1993

Review Of The Changing Image Of The City: Planning For Downtown Omaha, 1945-1973, Harl A. Dalstrom

Great Plains Quarterly

The title of this book is a fine indicator of its essential theme, for this is the story of how the prevailing images of Omaha determined the objectives of city planning. From 1945 to 1973, Omaha's economy changed fundamentally, and this reality eventually changed how local decision- makers perceived their community. These new perceptions finally brought a new orientation in planning for the heart of the city


Review Of Prevailing Over Time: Ethnic Adjustment On The Kansas Prairies, 1875-1925., Susan E. Gray Jan 1993

Review Of Prevailing Over Time: Ethnic Adjustment On The Kansas Prairies, 1875-1925., Susan E. Gray

Great Plains Quarterly

Prevailing Over Time is an exploration of the development of Swedish, Russian Mennonite, and French Canadian farming communities in central Kansas in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. McQuillan examines the immigrants' adoption of American social practices and the adjustment of ethnic and nativeborn settlers to farming in an area of unpredictable rainfall.


Review Of Aboriginal Water Rights In Canada: A Study Of Aboriginal Title To Water And Indian Rights, Theron Josephson Jan 1993

Review Of Aboriginal Water Rights In Canada: A Study Of Aboriginal Title To Water And Indian Rights, Theron Josephson

Great Plains Quarterly

This study is one of a series sponsored by the Canadian Institute for Natural Resource Law. Written by Richard Bartlett of the College of Law at the University of Saskatchewan, it is first and foremost a discourse on the current legal status of water rights of Canada's aboriginal peoples.


Review Of Groundwater Exploitation In The High Plains And Henry A. Wallace's Irrigation Frontier: On The Trail Of The Corn Belt Farmer, 1909, Sam Kepfield Jan 1993

Review Of Groundwater Exploitation In The High Plains And Henry A. Wallace's Irrigation Frontier: On The Trail Of The Corn Belt Farmer, 1909, Sam Kepfield

Great Plains Quarterly

David Kromm and Stephen White, both professors of geography at Kansas State University and experts on water use in the West, have gathered pieces by water experts. The result, Groundwater Exploitation in the High Plains, is a first-rate exploration of the methods and problems of groundwater utilization in the Ogallala Aquifer and the states overlying it-Kansas, Nebraska, Colorado, Oklahoma, Texas, and New Mexico.


Review Of Cheyenne Bottoms: Wetland In Jeopardy, Ernest Rouske Jan 1993

Review Of Cheyenne Bottoms: Wetland In Jeopardy, Ernest Rouske

Great Plains Quarterly

Millions of years ago earth crust movements caused a sixty-four-square mile area near what is now Great Bend in central Kansas to drop, creating a shallow, poorly drained basin. These wetlands, called Cheyenne Bottoms, draw hordes of waterfowl and shorebirds during spring and fall migrations. Its importance is such that it is considered one of the three major stop-over places for shorebirds east of the Rockies, "an oasis in a parched and wind seared landscape beckoning the greatest travelers on the globe."


Review Of Nebraska Moments: Glimpses Of Nebraska's Past, Micheal W. Schuyler Jan 1993

Review Of Nebraska Moments: Glimpses Of Nebraska's Past, Micheal W. Schuyler

Great Plains Quarterly

Nebraska Moments, by Donald Hickey, professor of history at Wayne State College in Nebraska, is a collection of thirty-nine essays about the state's past. The essays, which range in length from six to twelve pages, discuss personalities, institutions, places, and events that have shaped the state's history. Biographical sketches of such political figures as David Butler (Nebraska's first Governor), J. Sterling Morton, William Jennings Bryan, and George W. Norris; western and military heroes such as Buffalo Bill Cody and John J. Pershing; Native Americans such as Red Cloud and Standing Bear; and intellectual figures such as Louise ...


New World Encounters: Exploring The Great Plains Of North America, John L. Allen Jan 1993

New World Encounters: Exploring The Great Plains Of North America, John L. Allen

Great Plains Quarterly

Arising partly from the debates, scholarly and otherwise, surrounding the commemoration of the Columbian Quincentennial, the claim has been made that the European discovery and exploration of the New World was a process that had "meaning only in terms of European ignorance, not in terms of any contribution to universal knowledge"1 and that the study of exploration and discovery is therefore ethnocentric or (worse) racist. Such a claim, which denies the mechanisms of exploration and discovery their important place in the broader epistemological process of how we know and understand the world, is contentious.


An American Heart Of Darkness: The 1913 Expedition For American Indian Citizenship, Russel Lawrence Barsh Jan 1993

An American Heart Of Darkness: The 1913 Expedition For American Indian Citizenship, Russel Lawrence Barsh

Great Plains Quarterly

In his pungent essay on Conrad's Heart of Darkness, Chinua Achebe explores Europeans' literary use of African stereotypes to work out their own psycho-social dilemmas.1 The journey into Africa was in reality a journey inside the confused souls of explorers and missionaries who sometimes found salvation there but never saw, heard, or found the Africans. The Africans they imagined were only a dark reflection of themselves.


How Far West Am I?: The Almanac As An Explorer's Yardstick, Arlen J. Large Jan 1993

How Far West Am I?: The Almanac As An Explorer's Yardstick, Arlen J. Large

Great Plains Quarterly

On 14 September 1494, three ships from Spain lay anchored at the southeastern tip of Hispaniola. Their admiral, Christopher Columbus, looked up at a full moon expecting something to happen, and it did.


Exploring The Explorers: Great Plains Peoples And The Lewis And Clark Expedition, James P. Ronda Jan 1993

Exploring The Explorers: Great Plains Peoples And The Lewis And Clark Expedition, James P. Ronda

Great Plains Quarterly

There are few stories that seem more commonplace than the narrative of the exploration of the American West. It is the stock-in-trade of countless textbooks, classroom lectures, and popular novels. In the traditional telling, European and American adventurers are the actors at center stage while Native Americans stand silently in the wings or have bit parts.


Notes And News For Vol.13 No.2 Jan 1993

Notes And News For Vol.13 No.2

Great Plains Quarterly

No abstract provided.


Great Plains Quarterly: Table Of Contents Spring 1993 Vol. 13 No. 2 Jan 1993

Great Plains Quarterly: Table Of Contents Spring 1993 Vol. 13 No. 2

Great Plains Quarterly

No abstract provided.


Review Of Land In Her Own Name: Women As Homesteaders In North Dakota And Agrarian Women: Wives And Mothers In Rural Nebraska, 1880-1940, Evelyn Funda Jan 1993

Review Of Land In Her Own Name: Women As Homesteaders In North Dakota And Agrarian Women: Wives And Mothers In Rural Nebraska, 1880-1940, Evelyn Funda

Great Plains Quarterly

Much of the work studying women's role in the American West has served to establish the significance and celebrate the contributions of women to Western American history. Lindgren's book is such a work. Strikingly handsome, it portrays the lives of homesteading women in North Dakota from 1870 to about 1915 by providing excerpts from diaries, memoirs, and from personal interviews with homesteading women and their families, as well as a wealth of photographs and comparative statistics from land records. Lindgren's goals are to dispute the stereotypes of women pioneers and to argue that "women must be recognized ...


Review Of The Range, Don Gayton Jan 1993

Review Of The Range, Don Gayton

Great Plains Quarterly

"Range" is one of those consciously undefined words in our language. Rather than generating a single image, it produces many, from cowboys to science to art. Rancher/writer Sherm Ewing has put together a book that reinforces the complexity of range as a concept, as a field for economic activity, and as a subject of scientific inquiry.


Review Of Under An Open Sky: Rethinking America's Western Past., Marguerite Helmers Jan 1993

Review Of Under An Open Sky: Rethinking America's Western Past., Marguerite Helmers

Great Plains Quarterly

The influence of Frederick Jackson Turner's conception of the Western frontier can be measured by the efforts taken to refute him. The contributors to this volume have found him an imposing figure to contend with. As a result, Turner hovers behind almost every page and footnote. In their introduction, however, editors Cronon, Miles, and Gitlin argue that there is a need to set Turner aside in favor of a Western history that is based on a "community focus" rather than the achievements of individual men. Following this approach, essays by Gitlin, John Mack Faragher, Sarah Deutsch, Katherine Morrissey, and ...


Review Of Settlers' Children: Growing Up On The Great Plains, Paula M. Nelson Jan 1993

Review Of Settlers' Children: Growing Up On The Great Plains, Paula M. Nelson

Great Plains Quarterly

Elizabeth Hampsten wrote Settlers' Children: Growing Up on the Great Plains to answer some basic questions about the lives of children during the settlement era in North Dakota (with a few examples added from South Dakota and northwestern Minnesota). "What was it like for children in the first years of settlement ... what did they think of their childhood?" (p. 3) she asks. To provide the answers she examines memoirs and other autobiographical materials written by people who were children on the Plains and also examines the writings of some plains mothers who detailed the lives of their children. Most of ...


Review Of Prairyerth (A Deep Map)., Joseph J. Wydeven Jan 1993

Review Of Prairyerth (A Deep Map)., Joseph J. Wydeven

Great Plains Quarterly

This is a splendid book, ambitiously and selfconsciously American, at once contemporary and a throwback to the American Renaissance, calling up Thoreau's travels in Concord and inquiries into nature, as well as hints of Melville's metaphysical grapplings. Whereas in his first book, Blue Highways, William Least Heat-Moon moved up across American landscapes, here in Prairy Erth he stays put: in Chase County, Kansas, close to the center of America, he sinks down his probes, immerses himself in reports and archives, and holds discourse with all manner of persons, animals, plants, and things.


Categories And Terrains Of Exclusion: Constructing The "Indian Woman" In The Early Settlement Era In Western Canada, Sarah Carter Jan 1993

Categories And Terrains Of Exclusion: Constructing The "Indian Woman" In The Early Settlement Era In Western Canada, Sarah Carter

Great Plains Quarterly

In 1884 Mary E. Inderwick wrote to her Ontario family from the ranch near Pincher Creek, Alberta, where she had lived with her new husband for six months. 1 The letter provides a perspective on the stratifications of race, gender, and class that were forming as the Euro-Canadian enclave grew in the district of Alberta. Mary Inderwick lamented that it was a lonely life, as she was twenty-two miles from any other women, and she even offered to help some of the men near them to "get their shacks done up if only they will go east and marry some ...


Marguerite Laflesche Diddock: Office Of Indian Affairs Field Matron, Lisa E. Emmerich Jan 1993

Marguerite Laflesche Diddock: Office Of Indian Affairs Field Matron, Lisa E. Emmerich

Great Plains Quarterly

"I am an Indian girl fifteen years old .... Sometimes I am sorry that the white people ever came to America. What nice times we used to have before we were old enough to go to school, for then father used to take us on the buffalo hunt."l


The North Dakota Anit-Garb Law: Constitutional Conflictand Religious Strife, Linda Grathwohl Jan 1993

The North Dakota Anit-Garb Law: Constitutional Conflictand Religious Strife, Linda Grathwohl

Great Plains Quarterly

In a little known but apparently not uncommon practice in twentieth-century American education, public school systems across the nation, lacking teachers or money, employed Catholic nuns as teachers. Those opposed to employing sisters as teachers challenged their right to wear their habit, or religious garb, while teaching in a public school. 1 This paper provides the constitutional and religious background to this legal controversy and explores the issues in depth through a case study of sisters teaching in the state of North Dakota from the 1930s to the early 1960s.


Susan Laflesche Picotte.Md.: Nineteenth-Century Physician And Reformer, Valerie Sherer Mathes Jan 1993

Susan Laflesche Picotte.Md.: Nineteenth-Century Physician And Reformer, Valerie Sherer Mathes

Great Plains Quarterly

She was laid to rest beside her husband on a fall Sunday in a small Nebraska town. Three clergymen performed the simple service, the pastor of the Walthill Presbyterian Church, the pastor of the Blackbird Hills Mission, and a member of the Presbyterian Home Missions Board. The closing prayer was given by an Omaha tribal elder. That afternoon a moving graveside service was performed by members of the Amethyst Chapter of the Eastern Star. This diverse assemblage, paying their last respects on 19 September 1915 at the family home and at the Bancroft Cemetery, represented only one facet of the ...


Notes And News For Vol.13 No.3 Jan 1993

Notes And News For Vol.13 No.3

Great Plains Quarterly

No abstract provided.


Great Plains Quarterly: Table Of Contents Summer 1993 Vol. 13 No. 3 Jan 1993

Great Plains Quarterly: Table Of Contents Summer 1993 Vol. 13 No. 3

Great Plains Quarterly

No abstract provided.


Review Of Railroads Triumphant: The Growth, Rejection & Rebirth Of A Vital American Force, James W. Ely Jr. Jan 1993

Review Of Railroads Triumphant: The Growth, Rejection & Rebirth Of A Vital American Force, James W. Ely Jr.

Great Plains Quarterly

Albro Martin has authored a masterful account of the pivotal role of railroads in shaping American economic and social life. The foremost historian of American railroads, Martin examines the emergence of the railroad system in the antebellum era, the growth of the great transcontinental lines, and the numerous difficulties experienced by railroads in the twentieth century. He pictures the railroads as agents of change, noting that railroads were instrumental in opening the prairie states for settlement, facilitating industrialization, and forging a national market for goods. As America's first big business, the railroads also compelled the formulation of new legal ...


Review Of Wyoming Biographies, Susan H. Swetnam Jan 1993

Review Of Wyoming Biographies, Susan H. Swetnam

Great Plains Quarterly

Wyoming Biographies is a biographical dictionary (with a chatty introduction chronicling the settlement of Wyoming) that compiles in alphabetical order life sketches of approximately 265 pioneer citizens. Lawrence M. Woods has collated information from a variety of sources, drawing on contemporary subscription biographies, on more recently written histories, on biographies and memoirs of individuals, on reference works, and on miscellaneous materials (personal conversations and letters, materials in the Wyoming Historical Society collection, etc.). The content of entries varies, but most list the subject's date and place of birth, date of migration to Wyoming, occupation, and government offices.