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Great Plains Quarterly

1992

Articles 1 - 30 of 93

Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

Index To Vol.12 No.4 Jan 1992

Index To Vol.12 No.4

Great Plains Quarterly

No abstract provided.


Willa Cather's Women: Gender, Place, And Narrativity In O Pioneers! And My Antonia, David Laird Jan 1992

Willa Cather's Women: Gender, Place, And Narrativity In O Pioneers! And My Antonia, David Laird

Great Plains Quarterly

In a dissertation submitted to the Department of Rhetoric and Oratory at the University of Wisconsin in 1895, Zona Gale argued that American writers were a timid lot, lacking originality and unwilling or unable to see what was happening around them, the harsher truths of a social reality. They drew their material from art rather than from nature, books rather than life. "They had," she said, "all drawn from the same sources, imitated the same models and had not won their material so much from men as from books. "1 Like Zona Gale, Willa Cather was critical of writers content ...


Frontier Solons: Nebraska's Territorial Lawmaker, 1854-1867, James B. Potts Jan 1992

Frontier Solons: Nebraska's Territorial Lawmaker, 1854-1867, James B. Potts

Great Plains Quarterly

In the thirty-seven years since Earl Pomeroy maintained that the political history of the midnineteenth century American West needed "further study and clarification," Howard R. Lamar, Lewis Gould, Clark Spence, and other specialists have produced detailed studies of politicallife in the western territories. Their works have shed light on the everyday workings and failures of the American territorial system and have elucidated the distinctive political and economic conditions that shaped local institutions in Dakota, Wyoming, and other western regions and influenced what Kenneth Owens has labelled "the pattern and structure of western politics."1


Saskatchewan Bound: Migration To A New Canadian Frontier, Randy William Widds Jan 1992

Saskatchewan Bound: Migration To A New Canadian Frontier, Randy William Widds

Great Plains Quarterly

Almost forty years ago, Roland Berthoff used the published census to construct a map of English Canadian settlement in the United States for the year 1900 (Map 1).1 Migration among this group was generally short distance in nature, yet a closer examination of Berthoff's map reveals that considerable numbers of migrants gravitated toward more distant agricultural and urban frontiers and a reading of the historical literature on internal migration within North America emphasizes the fact that a significant number of Canadians living in the United States returned home to Canada during the period 1896-1914.2


Notes And News For Vol.12 No.4 Jan 1992

Notes And News For Vol.12 No.4

Great Plains Quarterly

No abstract provided.


Great Plains Quarterly: Table Of Contents Fall 1992 Vol. 12 No. 4 Jan 1992

Great Plains Quarterly: Table Of Contents Fall 1992 Vol. 12 No. 4

Great Plains Quarterly

No abstract provided.


Review Of The West As America: Reinterpreting Images Of The Frontier, 1820-1920, Stephen C. Behrendt Jan 1992

Review Of The West As America: Reinterpreting Images Of The Frontier, 1820-1920, Stephen C. Behrendt

Great Plains Quarterly

This rich collection of essays is intellectually substantial, culturally significant, and much overdue. One of the least appreciated phenomena of American culture is its remarkable history of self-fashioning. The American continent was settled by European immigrants for a variety of reasons over some four centuries, and each wave of settlers contributed to the burgeoning mythology of the New World its own set of self-fulfilling prophecies. "America" was--and to a significant extent still is--a largely European construct, a cultural matrix whose outlines emerged and evolved often re-actively as individuals and groups found their expectations challenged by the stark realities of the ...


Review Of Kansas Wildlife, Don Cunningham Jan 1992

Review Of Kansas Wildlife, Don Cunningham

Great Plains Quarterly

A catchword current among naturalists is "biodiversity," a term used to describe the variety and number of organisms present in an area. Biodiversity is one measure of the "health" of an environment, and the term itself is probably a useful one, as 1t can efficiently suggest environmental quality and the complex interrelationship among living things, plant and animal.


Review Of Campaigning With King, Joseph G. Dawson Iii Jan 1992

Review Of Campaigning With King, Joseph G. Dawson Iii

Great Plains Quarterly

For half a century the name of Charles King meant entertaining fiction about the institution that he knew and revered-the United States Army. King was a graduate of the U.S. Military Academy (Class of 1866), a professional soldier, and veteran of the Civil War, Reconstruction duty in the South, the Indian Wars, National Guard assignments, the Spanish-American War, and the Philippine campaign. His writings revealed much about the life of soldiers and officers during the late nineteenth century.


Review Of Removals: Nineteenth-Century American Literature And The Politics Of Indian Affairs, Sharon M. Harris Jan 1992

Review Of Removals: Nineteenth-Century American Literature And The Politics Of Indian Affairs, Sharon M. Harris

Great Plains Quarterly

In Removals Maddox exposes the complicity of many of our most treasured nineteenth-century American authors in the figurative-and consequently, quite literal-removal of American Indians from constructions of nineteenth century culture. That some of these authors viewed themselves as sympathetic to the "Indian question" merely demonstrates (as Maddox extends Roland Barthes' argument) how the myth of apoliticized discourse can result in the transformation of "history into nature."


Review Of Field Guide To Wildflowers Of Nebraska And The Great Plains, Roadside Wildflowers Of The Southern Great Plains, Wildflowers Of The Northern Great Plains, And Wildflowers Of The Taugrass Prairie: The Upper Midwest., Kathleen H. Keeler Jan 1992

Review Of Field Guide To Wildflowers Of Nebraska And The Great Plains, Roadside Wildflowers Of The Southern Great Plains, Wildflowers Of The Northern Great Plains, And Wildflowers Of The Taugrass Prairie: The Upper Midwest., Kathleen H. Keeler

Great Plains Quarterly

These four flower books represent a blossoming of attractive popular books describing prairie plants. Each of these four books has a slightly different goal. In terms of area covered, Farrar focuses on Nebraska, Vance, Jowsey and Mclean consider plants of the northern Great Plains, Freeman and Schofield aim at roadside wildflowers of the southern Plains, and Runkel and Roosa on wildflowers of the northern tallgrass prairie. The types of plants included vary also. Farrar includes both common and rare Nebraska wildflowers but no shrubs or trees, Vance et al. include common native wildflowers, visible introduced species, and some woody plants ...


The Railroad Question Revisited: Chicago, Milwaukee And St. Paul Railway V. Minnesota And Constitutional Limits On State Regulations, James W. Ely Jr. Jan 1992

The Railroad Question Revisited: Chicago, Milwaukee And St. Paul Railway V. Minnesota And Constitutional Limits On State Regulations, James W. Ely Jr.

Great Plains Quarterly

Few issues more vexed Americans during the Gilded Age than the regulation of railroads. America's first big business, the railroads wielded enormous economic power and by the end of the nineteenth century represented 10 percent of national wealth. 1 Farmers and other local shippers often viewed railroads as an exploitative monopoly and blamed them for excessive and discriminatory charges. They repeatedly clamored for regulation of the freight and passenger rates fixed by railroad companies. Agricultural interests in the Great Plains states were particularly active in seeking regulatory legislation. Railroad investors and managers, on the other hand, opposed regulatory laws ...


The Legal Culture Of The Great Plains, Kermit L. Hall Jan 1992

The Legal Culture Of The Great Plains, Kermit L. Hall

Great Plains Quarterly

The great prairie lawyer Abraham Lincoln once said of an opposing legal counsel's argument, "He caught on to something, but only by the hind leg."l Lincoln's observation applies with equal force to our current understanding of the legal culture of the Great Plains, and even that characterization is generous. Take, for example, the literature on the region's history of public and private law and legal institutions. It is pitifully small. Bits and pieces are scattered through specialized journals and state history periodicals, but there is nothing like a systematic body of scholarship. 2


The "Poison Porridge" Case: Chinese And The Administration Of Justice In Early Saskatchewan, Ken Leyton Brown Jan 1992

The "Poison Porridge" Case: Chinese And The Administration Of Justice In Early Saskatchewan, Ken Leyton Brown

Great Plains Quarterly

On the morning of 8 August 1907 a number of patrons were taking breakfast in the Capital Restaurant on Lome Street in Regina. The restaurant had not been in operation long but was apparently doing a good business, so it must have been somewhat disturbing to Mr. Steele, the owner and manager, when shortly after beginning their morning meal a number of his patrons became ill. The symptoms included quite severe abdominal pains so the decision was taken to send for a doctor who arrived to find nine people suffering from what was obviously something rather more serious than indigestion ...


Law On The Great Plains: An Introduction, John R. Wunder Jan 1992

Law On The Great Plains: An Introduction, John R. Wunder

Great Plains Quarterly

Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka is one of the most important cases in American jurisprudence. Almost everyone recognizes the name of the case and its importance for ending legal segregation in the United States, but almost no one pays any attention to its setting, Kansas and the Great Plains. Does this case represent part of a distinctive legal culture of the Great Plains? Until recently, we have had no way to answer this question because no one has ever attempted a systematic study of law on the Great Plains. This issue of the Great Plains Quarterly is the ...


Notes And News For Vol.12 No.2 Jan 1992

Notes And News For Vol.12 No.2

Great Plains Quarterly

No abstract provided.


Great Plains Quarterly: Table Of Contents Spring 1992 Vol. 12 No. 2 Jan 1992

Great Plains Quarterly: Table Of Contents Spring 1992 Vol. 12 No. 2

Great Plains Quarterly

No abstract provided.


Review Of Sterling's Carrie: Mrs. J. Sterling Morton, Polly P. Duryea Jan 1992

Review Of Sterling's Carrie: Mrs. J. Sterling Morton, Polly P. Duryea

Great Plains Quarterly

Margaret V. Ott has given a valuable gift to the pioneer descendants living close to the banks of the Big Muddy. From detailed journals, letters, and diaries, she traces the lives of the J. Sterling Morton family as they construct their home, Arbor Lodge, on the Morton Ranch near Nebraska City. Many in my transitional generation will find elements of their own history in Mrs. Ott's fictionalized biography, Sterling's Carrie.


Review Of Bachelor Bess: The Homesteading Letters Of Elizabeth Corey, 1909-1919, Michael J. Grant Jan 1992

Review Of Bachelor Bess: The Homesteading Letters Of Elizabeth Corey, 1909-1919, Michael J. Grant

Great Plains Quarterly

The experiences of a single female homesteader on the Great Plains of South Dakota are revealed in Bachelor Bess. This collection of letters spanning 1909-19 was written by Elizabeth Corey to her family in Iowa. The letters focus primarily on the social activities of Corey, who worked as a schoolteacher while homesteading in the West River country of South Dakota.


Review Of Cather Studies Volume 1, Susan A. Hallgarth Jan 1992

Review Of Cather Studies Volume 1, Susan A. Hallgarth

Great Plains Quarterly

Cather Studies is a new biennial series intended to display the quality and diversity of current scholarship on Cather. This first volume showcases papers presented at the Third National Seminar on Willa Cather (1987). Future volumes no doubt will continue to incorporate essays from these educational events and address, as they do, a broad audience. Contributors to this volume include teachers from all levels of the educational system (high school, junior college, four-year professional and liberal arts colleges, and state and research universities) and all parts of the United States (both coasts, the South, the Northeast, the Midwest, and the ...


Review Of The Trial Of Leanard Peltier., John Krejci Jan 1992

Review Of The Trial Of Leanard Peltier., John Krejci

Great Plains Quarterly

On 26 June 1975 in a firefight on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation between the FBI and AIM, two FBI agents were killed. AIM member Leonard Peltier and three other Indians were arrested. Only Peltier was convicted. The Trial of Leanard Peltier carefully documents the trial in its social and historical context.


Review Of Paula Gunn Allen, Deborah G. Plant Jan 1992

Review Of Paula Gunn Allen, Deborah G. Plant

Great Plains Quarterly

Elizabeth Hanson's Paula Gunn Allen is a very good overview of the extensive body of work of an important scholar, critic, and writer. Through a balance of summary and critical analysis, Hanson examines the content, style, and purpose of Paula Gunn Allen's work. As Hanson suggests, to know something about Allen's life and work is "to gain insight into the trans-formative art" that reveals Allen's "exceptionally acute visionary power" (p. 5). Hanson maintains that this visionary power and the creativity to which it gives rise are consequences of Allen's situatedness outside Native American and Anglo-American ...


Review Of Women Of The New Mexico Frontier 1846-1912, Janet E. Schulte Jan 1992

Review Of Women Of The New Mexico Frontier 1846-1912, Janet E. Schulte

Great Plains Quarterly

Historians of the women's west have centered their analysis around the extent to which Victorian culture shaped women's experience on the frontier. Cheryl Foote's collective biography of white women in New Mexico territory supports the argument that the Victorian cultural values, especially the cult of domesticity, were transferred with few mutations from the East to the Southwest during the nation's westward expansion.


An Uninviting Wilderness: The Plains Of West Texas, 153+1821, Félix D. Álmaraz, Jr. Jan 1992

An Uninviting Wilderness: The Plains Of West Texas, 153+1821, Félix D. Álmaraz, Jr.

Great Plains Quarterly

Throughout the entire colonial period of Texas, except for brief periods of gallant exploration and practical reconnaissance, Spanish pioneers carefully avoided the Plains of West Texas as a potential area of permanent settlement. Essentially because of the absence of dependable water resources, an all-important consideration prescribed in the Recopilacion de las Leyes de las Indias for the selection of occupation sites, Hispanics generally regarded the West Texas Plains with respectful awe and fearful apprehension. Spanish law prohibited settlers, notwithstanding personal initiative and the availability of land in great abundance, from occupying a region that lacked reliable sources of fresh water ...


The Role Of Canada's Prairie Provinces In Constitutional And Parliamentary Reform, Howard Cody Jan 1992

The Role Of Canada's Prairie Provinces In Constitutional And Parliamentary Reform, Howard Cody

Great Plains Quarterly

Canada's federation always has been tentative. This motley collection of French and English speakers, multiculturals and Native peoples, extended across a narrow ribbon of land just above the border with the United States, seems eternally fated to endure tension and uncertainty concerning its national identity and political institutions. This uncertainty may now have reached its highest point in Canada's history. The 1990 failure of the Meech Lake constitutional accord, which was intended to bring Quebec voluntarily into Canada's 1982 constitution, has inspired an unprecedented quest for new constitutional provisions acceptable to Canadians throughout the country. 1 In ...


Having Babies Or Not: Household Composition And Fertility In Rural Iowa And Nebraska, 1900,1910, Deborah Fink, Alicia Carriquiry Jan 1992

Having Babies Or Not: Household Composition And Fertility In Rural Iowa And Nebraska, 1900,1910, Deborah Fink, Alicia Carriquiry

Great Plains Quarterly

How did life change for people from the eastern prairie or forest regions when they crossed the Missouri River to settle in the Plains of Nebraska? The land presented its own social, economic, and environmental problems for the settlers. While some historians have emphasized the resourcefulness with which settlers adapted to maintain the life ways of the rural regions to the east, others have pointed to the cultural and social shifts effected by the plains environment. Considerable social divergence occurred within the plains population, even within the dominant northern European American ethnicity. This study addresses the lives of rural women ...


Notes And News For Vol.12 No.3 Jan 1992

Notes And News For Vol.12 No.3

Great Plains Quarterly

No abstract provided.


Great Plains Quarterly: Table Of Contents Summer 1992 Vol. 12 No. 3 Jan 1992

Great Plains Quarterly: Table Of Contents Summer 1992 Vol. 12 No. 3

Great Plains Quarterly

No abstract provided.


Review Of Reluctant Frontiersman: James Ross Larkin On The Santa Fe Trail, 1856~57., Michael A. Amundson Jan 1992

Review Of Reluctant Frontiersman: James Ross Larkin On The Santa Fe Trail, 1856~57., Michael A. Amundson

Great Plains Quarterly

In the fall of 1856, wealthy James Ross Larkin of St. Louis joined a wagon train headed by William Bent, bound for the trader's post on the Santa Fe Trail. Seeking relief from chronic health problems, Larkin instead found adventure. His heretofore unpublished journal of his trip and subsequent travels in New Mexico provides a rare glimpse into antebellum southwestern life. Besides the extensively annotated diary, Barbour also includes background introductions to Larkin, the Santa Fe Trail, the frontier of health seekers, and an 1856 comparison between the trail's endpoints of St. Louis and Santa Fe.


Review Of The Painting & Politics Of George Caleb Bingham., Stephen C. Behrendt Jan 1992

Review Of The Painting & Politics Of George Caleb Bingham., Stephen C. Behrendt

Great Plains Quarterly

Nancy Rash's superb study exemplifies the sort of reevaluation that results from tearing down the artificial walls of the gallery and the salon and relocating an artist within an accurate historical and cultural context. Rash introduces Bingham the total person: artist, certainly, but also writer, politician, legislator, polemicist, and social activist. Indeed, Bingham considered himself a public servant who just happened to be also a painter. This important distinction has been blurred by generations of critics who refused to see the "whole" Bingham and who consequently constructed an image of an artist depicting-in the scenes of Missouri life that ...