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Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

2016

Cancer

Articles 1 - 10 of 10

Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

Colorectal Cancer Screening: Barriers To The Faecal Occult Blood Test (Fobt) And Colonoscopy In Singapore, Sook Kwin Yong, Whee Sze Ong, Gerald Choon Huat Koh, Richard Ming Chert Yeo, Tam C. Ha Jan 2016

Colorectal Cancer Screening: Barriers To The Faecal Occult Blood Test (Fobt) And Colonoscopy In Singapore, Sook Kwin Yong, Whee Sze Ong, Gerald Choon Huat Koh, Richard Ming Chert Yeo, Tam C. Ha

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

Introduction: This study aims to identify the barriers to adopting faecal occult blood test (FOBT) and colonoscopy as colorectal cancer (CRC) screening methods among the eligible target population of Singapore. Materials and methods: This study was previously part of a randomised controlled trial reported elsewhere. Data was collected from Singapore residents aged 50 and above, via a household sample survey. The study recruited subjects who were aware of CRC screening methods, and interviewed them about the barriers to screening that they faced. Collected results on barriers to each screening method were analysed separately. Results: Out of the 343 subjects, 85 ...


General Practitioners' Experiences Of, And Responses To, Uncertainty In Prostate Cancer Screening: Insights From A Qualitative Study, Kristen Pickles, Stacy M. Carter, Lucie Rychetnik, Kirsten Mccaffery, Vikki A. Entwistle Jan 2016

General Practitioners' Experiences Of, And Responses To, Uncertainty In Prostate Cancer Screening: Insights From A Qualitative Study, Kristen Pickles, Stacy M. Carter, Lucie Rychetnik, Kirsten Mccaffery, Vikki A. Entwistle

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

Background Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing for prostate cancer is controversial. There are unresolved tensions and disagreements amongst experts, and clinical guidelines conflict. This both reflects and generates significant uncertainty about the appropriateness of screening. Little is known about general practitioners' (GPs') perspectives and experiences in relation to PSA testing of asymptomatic men. In this paper we asked the following questions: (1) What are the primary sources of uncertainty as described by GPs in the context of PSA testing? (2) How do GPs experience and respond to different sources of uncertainty? Methods This was a qualitative study that explored general practitioners ...


Cancer Beliefs In Ethnic Minority Populations: A Review And Meta-Synthesis Of Qualitative Studies, Sharon Licqurish, Lyn Phillipson, Peggy Chiang, Jennifer Walker, Fiona Walter, Jon Emery Jan 2016

Cancer Beliefs In Ethnic Minority Populations: A Review And Meta-Synthesis Of Qualitative Studies, Sharon Licqurish, Lyn Phillipson, Peggy Chiang, Jennifer Walker, Fiona Walter, Jon Emery

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

People from ethnic minorities often experience poorer cancer outcomes, possibly due to later presentation to healthcare and later diagnosis. We aimed to identify common cancer beliefs in minority populations in developed countries, which can affect symptom appraisal and help seeking for symptomatic cancer. Our systematic review found 15 relevant qualitative studies, located in the United Kingdom (six), United States (five), Australia (two) and Canada (two) of African, African-American, Asian, Arabic, Hispanic and Latino minority groups. We conducted a meta-synthesis that found specific emotional reactions to cancer, knowledge and beliefs and interactions with healthcare services as contributing factors in help seeking ...


Ethical Aspects Of Cancer Screening, Stacy M. Carter Jan 2016

Ethical Aspects Of Cancer Screening, Stacy M. Carter

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

Screening for cancer or cancer risk is well-established in high-income countries. This article considers ethical aspects of cancer screening. Ethical evaluation of screening depends on a contested evidence base, interacts with people's fear of cancer, and their enthusiasm for technology in general and screening in particular. Cancer screening is both a clinical and a public health activity, and so the often-conflicting frameworks from both clinical ethics and public health ethics are relevant to its evaluation. Cancer screening is an intrusion by health services into the lives of well individuals and so requires strong justification. Cancer screening can and should ...


All Care, But Whose Responsibility? Community Juries Reason About Expert And Patient Responsibilities In Prostate-Specific Antigen Screening For Prostate Cancer, Chris Degeling, Stacy M. Carter, Lucie Rychetnik Jan 2016

All Care, But Whose Responsibility? Community Juries Reason About Expert And Patient Responsibilities In Prostate-Specific Antigen Screening For Prostate Cancer, Chris Degeling, Stacy M. Carter, Lucie Rychetnik

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

General practitioners have implicitly been given responsibility for guiding men's decisions about prostate-specific antigen-based screening for prostate cancer, but patients' expectations of the bounds of this responsibility remain unclear. We sought to explore how well-informed members of the public allocate responsibilities in prostate-specific antigen screening decision-making. In 2014, we convened two Community juries in Sydney, Australia, to address questions related to the content and timing of information provision and respective roles of patients and general practitioners in screening decisions. Participants in the first jury were of mixed gender and of all ages (n = 15); the participants in the second ...


Routine Screening Of Indigenous Cancer Patients' Unmet Support Needs: A Qualitative Study Of Patient And Clinician Attitudes, Belinda Thewes, Esther L. Davis, Afaf Girgis, Patricia C. Valery, K Giam, Alison Hocking, J Jackson, Vincent He, Desmond Yip, Gail Garvey Jan 2016

Routine Screening Of Indigenous Cancer Patients' Unmet Support Needs: A Qualitative Study Of Patient And Clinician Attitudes, Belinda Thewes, Esther L. Davis, Afaf Girgis, Patricia C. Valery, K Giam, Alison Hocking, J Jackson, Vincent He, Desmond Yip, Gail Garvey

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

Indigenous Australians have poorer cancer outcomes in terms of incidence mortality and survival compared with non-Indigenous Australians. The factors contributing to this disparity are complex. Identifying and addressing the psychosocial factors and support needs of Indigenous cancer patients may help reduce this disparity. The Supportive Care Needs Assessment Tool for Indigenous People (SCNAT-IP) is a validated 26-item questionnaire developed to assess their unmet supportive care needs. This qualitative study reports on patient and clinician attitudes towards feasibility and acceptability of SCNAT-IP in routine care.


Do Wi-Fi And Mobile Phones Really Cause Cancer? Experts Respond, Simon Chapman, Darren Saunders, Rodney J. Croft, Sarah P. Loughran Jan 2016

Do Wi-Fi And Mobile Phones Really Cause Cancer? Experts Respond, Simon Chapman, Darren Saunders, Rodney J. Croft, Sarah P. Loughran

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

On 16th February, Catalyst aired an episode on the ABC titled "Wi-Fried", hosted by Dr Maryanne Demasi, claiming that radiation from mobile phones and Wi-Fi may constitute a brain cancer risk. We invited experts who have conducted research into this area to respond to the claims made in the programme.


Spatiotemporal Variations In Lung Cancer Mortality In China Between 2006 And 2012: A Multilevel Analysis, Yunning Liu, Thomas E. Astell-Burt, Jiangmei Liu, Peng Yin, Xiaoqi Feng, Jinling You, Andrew Page, Maigeng Zhou, Lijun Wang Jan 2016

Spatiotemporal Variations In Lung Cancer Mortality In China Between 2006 And 2012: A Multilevel Analysis, Yunning Liu, Thomas E. Astell-Burt, Jiangmei Liu, Peng Yin, Xiaoqi Feng, Jinling You, Andrew Page, Maigeng Zhou, Lijun Wang

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

We investigated temporal trends and geographical variations in lung cancer mortality in China from 2006 to 2012. Lung cancer mortality counts for people aged over 40 years were extracted from the China Mortality Surveillance System for 161 disease surveillance points. Negative binomial regression was used to investigate potential spatiotemporal variation and correlations with age, gender, urbanization, and region. Lung cancer mortality increased in China over the study period from 78.77 to 85.63 (1/100,000), with higher mortality rates evident in men compared to women. Median rate ratios (MRRs) indicated important geographical variation in lung cancer mortality between ...


The Role Of Personalised Choice In Decision Support: A Randomized Controlled Trial Of An Online Decision Aid For Prostate Cancer Screening, Glenn P. Salkeld, Michelle Cunich, Jack Dowie, Kirsten Howard, Manish I. Patel, Graham Mann, Wendy Lipworth Jan 2016

The Role Of Personalised Choice In Decision Support: A Randomized Controlled Trial Of An Online Decision Aid For Prostate Cancer Screening, Glenn P. Salkeld, Michelle Cunich, Jack Dowie, Kirsten Howard, Manish I. Patel, Graham Mann, Wendy Lipworth

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

Importance Decision support tools can assist people to apply population-based evidence on benefits and harms to individual health decisions. A key question is whether "personalising" choice within decisions aids leads to better decision quality. Objective To assess the effect of personalising the content of a decision aid for prostate cancer screening using the Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) test. Design Randomized controlled trial. Setting Australia. Participants 1,970 men aged 40-69 years were approached to participate in the trial. Intervention 1,447 men were randomly allocated to either a standard decision aid with a fixed set of five attributes or a ...


Doctors' Perspectives On Psa Testing Illuminate Established Differences In Prostate Cancer Screening Rates Between Australia And The Uk: A Qualitative Study, Kristen Pickles, Stacy M. Carter, Lucie Rychetnik, Vikki A. Entwistle Jan 2016

Doctors' Perspectives On Psa Testing Illuminate Established Differences In Prostate Cancer Screening Rates Between Australia And The Uk: A Qualitative Study, Kristen Pickles, Stacy M. Carter, Lucie Rychetnik, Vikki A. Entwistle

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

Objectives To examine how general practitioners (GPs) in the UK and GPs in Australia explain their prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing practices and to illuminate how these explanations are similar and how they are different. Design A grounded theory study. Setting Primary care practices in Australia and the UK. Participants 69 GPs in Australia (n=40) and the UK (n=29). We included GPs of varying ages, sex, clinical experience and patient populations. All GPs interested in participating in the study were included. Results GPs' accounts revealed fundamental differences in whether and how prostate cancer screening occurred in their practice and ...