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Disability Law Commons

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Articles 1 - 7 of 7

Full-Text Articles in Disability Law

Between A Bed And A Hard Place: How Washington Can Keep Psychiatric Patients In Treatment And Off The Streets, Spencer Babbitt Nov 2015

Between A Bed And A Hard Place: How Washington Can Keep Psychiatric Patients In Treatment And Off The Streets, Spencer Babbitt

Seattle University Law Review

On February 27, 2013, ten psychiatric patients were being involuntarily detained in hospital emergency departments located in Pierce County under Washington State’s Involuntary Treatment Act (ITA). Despite the name of the law that authorized their detainment, these individuals were not receiving any psychiatric treatment during their confinement. Nor were they there as the result of a criminal conviction. The only thing these ten detainees were guilty of was being mentally ill. Under what is now considered to have been a misinterpretation of the ITA, counties across Washington had for years been confining mentally ill patients in hospitals not certified ...


How Teaching About Therapeutic Jurisprudence Can Be A Tool Of Social Justice, And Lead Law Students To Personally And Socially Rewarding Careers: Sexuality And Disability As A Case Example, Michael L. Perlin, Alison J. Lynch Sep 2015

How Teaching About Therapeutic Jurisprudence Can Be A Tool Of Social Justice, And Lead Law Students To Personally And Socially Rewarding Careers: Sexuality And Disability As A Case Example, Michael L. Perlin, Alison J. Lynch

Nevada Law Journal

No abstract provided.


The Right Of The Physically And Mentally Handicapped: Amendments Necessary To Guarantee Protection Through The Civil Rights Act Of 1964, Patrick T. Ryan Jul 2015

The Right Of The Physically And Mentally Handicapped: Amendments Necessary To Guarantee Protection Through The Civil Rights Act Of 1964, Patrick T. Ryan

Akron Law Review

SINGLE STROKES of the government's pen can seldom alone accomplish social goals. To insure vitality, legislation requires review, revision and amendment. Though worthy of praise for initial and continuing contributions towards social betterment, the Civil Rights Act of 19641 falls into this classification. Its scope is too narrow because it fails to include a significant group of persons sorely in need of its protection. This legislation needs the depth evoked by its title rather than the limitations of its present language. Amendment is required to protect the rights of the physically and mentally handicapped.


Exhibits To Accompany Testimony & Statement Of Dean Hill Rivkin Before The Senate Judiciary Committee (21 April 2015), Dean H. Rivkin Apr 2015

Exhibits To Accompany Testimony & Statement Of Dean Hill Rivkin Before The Senate Judiciary Committee (21 April 2015), Dean H. Rivkin

College of Law Faculty Scholarship

Exhibits to accompany testimony and statement-of-record of Professor Dean Hill Rivkin (The University of Tennessee College of Law), as submitted on April 21, 2015, before a hearing convened by the U.S. Senate Committee on the Judiciary: “Improving Accountability and Oversight of Juvenile Justice Grants.”


Disparate Impact And Pregnancy: Title Vii's Other Accommodation Requirement, Camille Hébert Jan 2015

Disparate Impact And Pregnancy: Title Vii's Other Accommodation Requirement, Camille Hébert

American University Journal of Gender, Social Policy & the Law

No abstract provided.


Identity And Narrative: Turning Oppression Into Client Empowerment In Social Security Disability Cases, Jonel Newman Jan 2015

Identity And Narrative: Turning Oppression Into Client Empowerment In Social Security Disability Cases, Jonel Newman

Articles

No abstract provided.


Medicaid At 50: No Longer Limited To The "Deserving" Poor?, David Orentlicher Jan 2015

Medicaid At 50: No Longer Limited To The "Deserving" Poor?, David Orentlicher

Scholarly Works

Professor David Orentlicher considers the significance of the passage of the Affordable Care Act on the Medicaid program. He discusses the expansion of the program's recipients from merely children, pregnant women, single caretakers of children, and disabled persons to all persons up to 138% of the federal poverty level. Professor Orentlicher argues that the Medicaid expansion reflects concerns about the high costs of health care rather than an evolution in societal thinking about the "deserving" poor. As a result, the expansion may not provide a stable source of health care coverage for the expansion population.