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Articles 1 - 13 of 13

Full-Text Articles in Law

Baker V. State And The Promise Of The New Judicial Federalism, Charles H. Baron, Lawrence Friedman Dec 2001

Baker V. State And The Promise Of The New Judicial Federalism, Charles H. Baron, Lawrence Friedman

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

In Baker v. State, the Supreme Court of Vermont ruled that the state constitution’s Common Benefits Clause prohibits the exclusion of same-sex couples from the benefits and protections of marriage. Baker has been praised by constitutional scholars as a prototypical example of the New Judicial Federalism. The authors agree, asserting that the decision sets a standard for constitutional discourse by dint of the manner in which each of the opinions connects and responds to the others, pulls together arguments from other state and federal constitutional authorities, and provides a clear basis for subsequent development of constitutional principle. This Article ...


Purveyance And Power Or Over-Priced Free Lunch: The Intellectual Property Clause As An Ally Of The Takings Clause In The Public’S Control Of Government, Malla Pollack Oct 2001

Purveyance And Power Or Over-Priced Free Lunch: The Intellectual Property Clause As An Ally Of The Takings Clause In The Public’S Control Of Government, Malla Pollack

Malla Pollack

Government can bypass citizen control if it can use revenue not publicly scrutinized through the public taxing/spending system. One method of bypass is paying with non-monetary compensation such as (i) property, or (ii) the right to charge others for some necessary good or service, intangible property. The Takings/Just Compensation Clause of the Fifth Amendment is one authority controlling government's ability to bypass financial scrutiny. In this article, I argue that the Intellectual Property Clause also should be used to control some governmental bypass. I attempt to justify this suggestion both theoretically and historically. The historical material included ...


When Was The Yale Law School Really Founded?, Michael T. Sansbury May 2001

When Was The Yale Law School Really Founded?, Michael T. Sansbury

Student Legal History Papers

In 1874, during the celebration of the Yale Law School's "Semicentennial Anniversary," Theodore Woolsey, a former Yale President and Professor at the Law School, claimed that the Law School had been founded in 1824 when a group of students were listed as "Law Students" in the Yale Catalogue. These students studied in a small proprietary law school started by Seth P. Staples and operated, in 1824, by Samuel J. Hitchcock and David Daggett. Their listing in the catalogue seems to indicate a connection between the Staples-Hitchcock-Daggett school and Yale College. Since 1874, Yale historians and the Yale Law School ...


Berle And Means Reconsidered At The Century's Turn, William W. Bratton Apr 2001

Berle And Means Reconsidered At The Century's Turn, William W. Bratton

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


Cases Concerning Equity And The Courts Of Equity 1550-1660, William Hamilton Bryson Jan 2001

Cases Concerning Equity And The Courts Of Equity 1550-1660, William Hamilton Bryson

Law Faculty Publications

This volume of previously unpublished equity reports in the period 1550-1660 includes cases of substantive equity prosecuted by English bill procedure, cases that explain the jurisdiction, procedures, and practices of the courts of equity in England, and a few cases from the courts of common law that touch on and consider the jurisdiction of the equity courts. Also included are cases in the equity courts that involve equitable remedies needed to protect common law rights. Frequently the equity judge had to determine a common law right before an equitable remedy could be granted.


James Madison And The Constitution's “Convention For Proposing Amendments", Robert G. Natelson Jan 2001

James Madison And The Constitution's “Convention For Proposing Amendments", Robert G. Natelson

Robert G. Natelson

This article traces the progress of James Madison's thought on the Constitution's "convention for proposing amendments as a way for states to assert themselves against the federal government. Madison saw the convention as an important part of the Constitution, and a constitutional alternative to nullification.


Arab Politics In A Jewish State: El - Ard Movement And The Supreme Court (In Hebrew), Ron Harris Jan 2001

Arab Politics In A Jewish State: El - Ard Movement And The Supreme Court (In Hebrew), Ron Harris

Ron Harris

No abstract provided.


What's So Special About American Law?, William Ewald Jan 2001

What's So Special About American Law?, William Ewald

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


Lochner, Liquor, And Longshoremen: A Puzzle In Progressive Era Federalism, Barry Cushman Jan 2001

Lochner, Liquor, And Longshoremen: A Puzzle In Progressive Era Federalism, Barry Cushman

Journal Articles

In 1890, the Supreme Court shocked and thrilled the civilized world with the announcement that dry states could not prohibit the sale of liquor shipped in from outside the state. So long as the out-of-state goods remained in their "original packages," the Court held they retained their character as interstate commerce subject only to federal regulation. The consequences for the cause of local sobriety were, predictably, catastrophic. The proliferation in temperance territory of "original package saloons," at which one could purchase liquor free from the superintendence of local liquor authorities, was appalling to dry eyes. Members of Congress immediately proposed ...


The Place Of Workers In Corporate Law, Kent Greenfield Jan 2001

The Place Of Workers In Corporate Law, Kent Greenfield

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

This article critiques the low place of workers within corporate law doctrine. Corporate law, as it is traditionally taught, is primarily about shareholders, boards of directors, and managers, and the relationships among them. This is despite the fact that workers provide an essential input to a corporation's productive activities, and that the success of the business enterprise quite often turns on the success of the relationship between the corporation and those who are employed by it. Black letter corporate law requires directors to place the interests of shareholders above the interests of all other "stakeholders," including workers. This article ...


Apologies Or Apologisits? Remembering The Japanese American Internment In Wyoming, Eric L. Muller Jan 2001

Apologies Or Apologisits? Remembering The Japanese American Internment In Wyoming, Eric L. Muller

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Impeachment Defanged And Other Institutional Ramifications Of The Clinton Scandals, Michael J. Gerhardt Jan 2001

Impeachment Defanged And Other Institutional Ramifications Of The Clinton Scandals, Michael J. Gerhardt

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Apuntes Para Una Biobibliografía De Don Manuel Cervantes Rendón, Historiador Del Derecho, Óscar Cruz Dec 2000

Apuntes Para Una Biobibliografía De Don Manuel Cervantes Rendón, Historiador Del Derecho, Óscar Cruz

Óscar Cruz Barney

No abstract provided.