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Articles 1 - 14 of 14

Full-Text Articles in Law

Jury Trial In Japan, Robert Bloom Oct 2013

Jury Trial In Japan, Robert Bloom

Robert Bloom

No abstract provided.


Circumventing Congress: How The Federal Courts Opened The Door To Impeaching Criminal Defendants With Prior Convictions, Jeffrey Bellin Dec 2008

Circumventing Congress: How The Federal Courts Opened The Door To Impeaching Criminal Defendants With Prior Convictions, Jeffrey Bellin

Faculty Publications

This Article spotlights the flawed analytical framework at the heart of the federal courts’ approach to one of the most controversial trial practices in American criminal jurisprudence — the admission of prior convictions to impeach the credibility of defendants who testify. As the Article explains, the flawed approach is a byproduct of the courts’ reliance on a five-factor analytical framework to implement the governing legal standard enacted by Congress in Federal Rule of Evidence 609. Tracing the evolution of the fivefactor framework from its roots in pre-Rule 609 case law, the Article demonstrates that the courts’ reinterpretation of the framework in ...


Get In The Game Or Get Out Of The Way: Fixing The Politics Of Death, Adam M. Gershowitz Sep 2008

Get In The Game Or Get Out Of The Way: Fixing The Politics Of Death, Adam M. Gershowitz

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


The Significance (If Any) For The Federal Criminal Justice System Of Advances In Lie Detector Technology, Jeffrey Bellin Sep 2008

The Significance (If Any) For The Federal Criminal Justice System Of Advances In Lie Detector Technology, Jeffrey Bellin

Faculty Publications

Against a backdrop of accelerating developments in the science of lie detection certain to reopen the debate on the reliability and therefore admissibility of lie detector evidence in the federal courts, this Article examines whether the prohibition on hearsay evidence (or other evidentiary objections) will preclude admissibility of even scientifically reliable lie detector evidence. The Article concludes that the hearsay prohibition, which has been largely ignored by courts and commentators, is the primary obstacle to the future admission of scientifically valid lie detector evidence. The Article also suggests a potential solution to the hearsay problem that may allow admission of ...


Habitations Of Cruelty - Pitfalls Of Expanding Hate Crime Legislation To Include The Homeless, Scott A. Steiner Apr 2008

Habitations Of Cruelty - Pitfalls Of Expanding Hate Crime Legislation To Include The Homeless, Scott A. Steiner

Scott A Steiner

Hate crime law has developed and expanded substantially since its earliest form. A concerted effort is currently underway to expand existing hate crime legislation to include the homeless.

This paper provides a history of both state and federal hate crime legislation, examines precisely what a hate crime is (and how that definition differs from state to state), explores the growing problem of violence against the homeless, and analyzes recent developments in expanding state and local law to protect based on homelessness.

It offers both arguments in favor and arguments against the expansion of hate crime laws to include the homeless ...


Race, Genes, And Justice: A Call To Reform The Presentation Of Forensic Dna Evidence In Criminal Trials, Jonathan Kahn Feb 2008

Race, Genes, And Justice: A Call To Reform The Presentation Of Forensic Dna Evidence In Criminal Trials, Jonathan Kahn

Jonathan Kahn

The article considers how and when, if at all, is it appropriate to use race in presenting forensic DNA evidence in a court of law? This relatively straightforward question has been wholly overlooked by legal scholars. By pursuing it, this article promises to transform fundamentally the presentation forensic DNA evidence. Currently, it is standard practice for prosecutors to use race in presenting the odds that a given defendant’s DNA matches DNA found at a crime scene. This article takes an interdisciplinary approach to question the validity of this widespread but largely uninterrogated practice. It examines how race came to ...


Expanding The Arsenal For Sentencing Environmental Crimes: Would Therapeutic Jurisprudence And Restorative Justice Work?, Carrie C. Boyd Feb 2008

Expanding The Arsenal For Sentencing Environmental Crimes: Would Therapeutic Jurisprudence And Restorative Justice Work?, Carrie C. Boyd

William & Mary Environmental Law and Policy Review

No abstract provided.


Free To Leave? An Empirical Look At The Fourth Amendment’S Seizure Standard, David K. Kessler Jan 2008

Free To Leave? An Empirical Look At The Fourth Amendment’S Seizure Standard, David K. Kessler

David K Kessler

Whether a person has been “seized” often determines if he or she receives Fourth Amendment protection. The Supreme Court has established a standard for identifying seizures: a person is seized when a reasonable person in his situation would not have felt free to leave or otherwise terminate the encounter with law enforcement. In applying that standard, today’s courts conduct crucial seizure inquiries relying only on their own beliefs about when a reasonable person would feel free to leave. Both the Court and scholars have noted that, though empirical evidence about whether people actually feel free to leave would help ...


Portland, Prohibition And Probable Cause: Maine's Role In Shaping Modern Criminal Procedure, Wesley M. Oliver Jan 2008

Portland, Prohibition And Probable Cause: Maine's Role In Shaping Modern Criminal Procedure, Wesley M. Oliver

Wesley M Oliver

At the time the Constitution was written, police officers had very little power. In most cases they were required to wait for a complaint from a victim to arrest, or a warrant from a magistrate to perform a search of any kind. Victims had extraordinary discretion in this era. Generally, only victims could seek arrest or search warrants and they were required only to allege that they had probable cause to support the arrest or search they sought. In most cases, an officer could not obtain a warrant even if he could provide the facts supporting his suspicions. Warrantless arrests ...


Tactical Ineffective Assistance In Capital Trials, Kyle Graham Jan 2008

Tactical Ineffective Assistance In Capital Trials, Kyle Graham

American University Law Review

Are defense attorneys sandbagging in their death-penalty cases? In Poindexter v. Mitchell, a habeas corpus case decided in 2006, Chief Judge Danny Boggs of the United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit wrote that by conducting a deliberately defective investigation into mitigation evidence that might otherwise have been presented at the penalty phase of a capital trial, a defense attorney can virtually guarantee that any death sentence the jury returns will be vacated in later proceedings. The likelihood of such an outcome, Boggs wrote, will more than make up for the somewhat greater chance that a jury that ...


The Mythical Divide Between Collateral And Direct Consequences Of Criminal Convictions: Involuntary Commitment Of "Sexually Violent Predators", Jenny M. Roberts Jan 2008

The Mythical Divide Between Collateral And Direct Consequences Of Criminal Convictions: Involuntary Commitment Of "Sexually Violent Predators", Jenny M. Roberts

Articles in Law Reviews & Other Academic Journals

No abstract provided.


Russia's Criminal Procedure Code Five Years Out, William Burnham, Jeffrey Kahn Jan 2008

Russia's Criminal Procedure Code Five Years Out, William Burnham, Jeffrey Kahn

Faculty Scholarship

After a long delay in drafting, a new Criminal Procedure Code for Russia was passed in 2001 and went into effect in 2002. The new Code contains some striking innovations, most notably changes at the trial stage, which implement the constitutional requirements of adversarial principles. However, it also retains several throwbacks to the past, particularly its preservation of the formal pretrial investigation, during which evidence is parsed and collected in a dossier, which then dominates the trial of the case. The result is that old and new constantly contend with each other. Implementation of the new adversarial procedures is also ...


Dead Wrong, Ronald Wright, Marc Miller Dec 2007

Dead Wrong, Ronald Wright, Marc Miller

Ronald F. Wright

DNA-driven exonerations offer many lessons for police, for prosecutors, and for legislatures. Many scholars have focused on novel procedures to identify and remedy wrongful convictions after they occur. Scholars have also concluded that in our administrative criminal justice system we need prosecutors who are driven less by testosterone and more by a balanced search for the truth.

In our view, the most enduring changes to the work of prosecutors will focus not on softening their adversarial perspective, but on enhancing and staying true to the traditional core of their work on the front end of the process—the charging decisions ...


Jury Trial In Japan, Robert Bloom Dec 2007

Jury Trial In Japan, Robert Bloom

Robert M. Bloom

No abstract provided.