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Law and Contemporary Problems

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Full-Text Articles in Law

Rules, Standards, And The Model Business Corporation Act, Michael P. Dooley Jan 2011

Rules, Standards, And The Model Business Corporation Act, Michael P. Dooley

Law and Contemporary Problems

No abstract provided.


Irreconcilable Differences? The Troubled Marriage Of Science And Law, Susan Haack Jan 2009

Irreconcilable Differences? The Troubled Marriage Of Science And Law, Susan Haack

Law and Contemporary Problems

There haven't always been scientific witnesses: in fact, there haven't always been witnesses. In early medieval times, courts relied on tests by oath, ordeal, and sometimes by combat. Here, Haack provides a brief historical background to the use of scientific experts in law and then proceeds to discuss in greater detail the values underlying scientific inquiry, the uncertainty in the quest of knowledge and understanding, and the methods by which consensus is reached, even if that consensus is always tentative. She then contrasts scientific inquiry with the law's quest for "truth" in the courtroom and, particularly, the ...


The Arts Of Persuasion In Science And Law: Conflicting Norms In The Courtroom, Herbert M. Kritzer Jan 2009

The Arts Of Persuasion In Science And Law: Conflicting Norms In The Courtroom, Herbert M. Kritzer

Law and Contemporary Problems

Epistemology is important in the debate about science and technology in the courtroom. The epistemological issues and the arguments about them in the context of scientific and technical evidence are now well developed. Of equal importance, though, is an understanding of norms of persuasion and how those norms may differ across disciplines and groups. Norms of persuasion in the courtroom and in legal briefs differ from norms at a scientific conference and in scientific journals. Here, Kritzer examines the disconnect between science and the courtroom in terms of the differing norms of persuasion found within the scientific community and within ...


Colonialism Without Colonies: On The Extraterritorial Jurisprudence Of The U.S. Court For China, Teemu Ruskola Jul 2008

Colonialism Without Colonies: On The Extraterritorial Jurisprudence Of The U.S. Court For China, Teemu Ruskola

Law and Contemporary Problems

The US Court for China was created by Congress in 1906, and it was not abolished until 1943. The Shanghai-based court had extraterritorial jurisdiction over all American citizens within its district, known as the District of China for jurisdictional purposes. The court is fascinating in its own right, and it produced what one observer has described as a system of jurisdiction that was more complete than that of any body extraterritorial law. Here, Ruskola elaborates the court's jurisprudence. He focuses on some of the conflicts-of-law problems the court had to face. Also, he describes the law applied by the ...


Delegating To International Courts: Self-Binding Vs. Other-Binding Delegation, Karen J. Alter Jan 2008

Delegating To International Courts: Self-Binding Vs. Other-Binding Delegation, Karen J. Alter

Law and Contemporary Problems

Alter highlights the diverse nature of international delegations to courts. She argues that the roles and tasks delegated to international courts increasingly mimic in form and content the broad variety of tasks delegated to courts in liberal democracies, but that delegating these tasks to international courts is fundamentally different than delegating them to domestic courts because of the implications for national sovereignty. Whereas international courts were initially established to be dispute-resolution bodies, they now also perform administrative review, enforcement, and even constitutional review. Alter explains how each of these judicial roles binds other actors, binds states, or both.


Public Health Versus Court-Sponsored Secrecy, Daniel J. Givelber, Anthony Robbins Jul 2006

Public Health Versus Court-Sponsored Secrecy, Daniel J. Givelber, Anthony Robbins

Law and Contemporary Problems

Public health practice relies on access to information. Givelber and Robbins discuss the debate about "court-sponsored" secrecy: Whether or not courts should tolerate, edorse, or protect secrecy when the sequestered information might help protect the public health.


International Criminal Law After Rome: Concerns From A U.S. Military Perspective, William K. Lietzau Jan 2001

International Criminal Law After Rome: Concerns From A U.S. Military Perspective, William K. Lietzau

Law and Contemporary Problems

Lietzau argues that the US cannot support the International Criminal Court because it fails to recognize its unique responsibilities in the world when issues of international peace and security are involved. The changes sought by the US in the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court should be implemented not just because US participation is key to an effective, functioning court, but because enacting them promotes the rule of law and is therefore the right thing to do.


The International Criminal Court: Issues For Consideration By The United States Senate, Patricia Mcnerney Jan 2001

The International Criminal Court: Issues For Consideration By The United States Senate, Patricia Mcnerney

Law and Contemporary Problems

McNerney states that many in Congress who oppose the International Criminal Court are also some of the stronger advocates of the US speaking out against human rights abuses around the world. Rather than advocating the creation of an international criminal court that attempts to take decision making authority away from governments and invalidate the rule of law, however, they argue that more should be done to facilitate extradition of criminals to stand trial where they are accused.


The Irresolution Of Rome, Ruth Wedgwood Jan 2001

The Irresolution Of Rome, Ruth Wedgwood

Law and Contemporary Problems

Wedgwood argues that it would be a pity to allow international misjudgment of the long-term security environment to generate a disregard for the constructive tasks of American military power, and fatally hobble shared support for an effective criminal tribunal. American Senators and military leaders--and the American public--will want to see how the International Criminal Court works in practice before considering the possibility of full ratification and formal membership. If this "look-over" period is not safe, the advocates seeking a "war on the court" may win the day.


The Risks And Weaknesses Of The International Criminal Court From America’S Perspective, John R. Bolton Jan 2001

The Risks And Weaknesses Of The International Criminal Court From America’S Perspective, John R. Bolton

Law and Contemporary Problems

Bolton argues the US should raise its objections to the International Criminal Court (ICC) on every appropriate occasion, as part of its larger campaign to assert American interests against stifling, illegitimate, and unacceptable international agreements. The US has many alternative foreign policy instruments to utilize that are fully consistent with US interests, leaving the ICC to the obscurity it richly deserves.


The International Criminal Court: Current Issues And Perspectives, Philippe Kirsch Q.C. Jan 2001

The International Criminal Court: Current Issues And Perspectives, Philippe Kirsch Q.C.

Law and Contemporary Problems

The creation of a permanent international criminal court (ICC) has been seen as a desirable objective for a long time, but its implementation is hampered by controversy. Proponents of the court believe that the ICC has great potential to render justice in cases of genocide, war crimes, and crimes against humanity, and to deter the future perpetration of those crimes. Skeptics question the wisdom of placing the power to adjudicate highly politically charged cases into the hands of an international tribunal.


Judicial Discipline And Judicial Independence, Steven Lubet Jul 1998

Judicial Discipline And Judicial Independence, Steven Lubet

Law and Contemporary Problems

The question of judicial accountability and independence arises primarily in the context of state courts. When it comes to accountability, it is state judges who must be concerned about threates to their independence.


On Not Making Law, Mitu Gulati, C. M. A. Mccauliff Jul 1998

On Not Making Law, Mitu Gulati, C. M. A. Mccauliff

Law and Contemporary Problems

Having argued that it is important to think about court norms, Gulati and McCauliff describe data on the publication practices of the various circuits. The data suggest that there are radical differences in the norms.


Judicial Independence And Democratic Accountability In Highest State Courts, Paul D. Carrington Jul 1998

Judicial Independence And Democratic Accountability In Highest State Courts, Paul D. Carrington

Law and Contemporary Problems

Carrington notes that because judges in trial and intermediate courts are accountable to highest courts, it is the latter that are responsible for keeping the faith with democratic traditions.


Of Characterization And Other Matters: Thoughts About Multiple Damages, G. Robert Blakey Jul 1997

Of Characterization And Other Matters: Thoughts About Multiple Damages, G. Robert Blakey

Law and Contemporary Problems

Blakey argues that economic analysis in the courts must be substantially supported by other insights, say from ethics or history.


Constitutional Equity And The Innovative Tradition, William T. Quillen Jul 1993

Constitutional Equity And The Innovative Tradition, William T. Quillen

Law and Contemporary Problems

It is argued that the court's status as a general equity court with constitutionally vested jurisdiction has benefitted the legal system. The Delaware court of chancery is an example of an equity court that resolves complex disputes expeditiously and lets the litigants move on.


Oppressed But Not Betrayed: A Comparative Assessment Of Canadian Remedies For Minority Shareholders And Other Corporate Constituents, Deborah A. Demott Jan 1993

Oppressed But Not Betrayed: A Comparative Assessment Of Canadian Remedies For Minority Shareholders And Other Corporate Constituents, Deborah A. Demott

Law and Contemporary Problems

The distinctive Canadian contribution to the resolution of conflict among shareholders and of conflict between nonshareholder constituents--such as creditors--and persons controlling a corporation, typically its shareholders and directors, is examined with respect to comparable US judicial remedies.


Exit Rights Under Federalism, Richard A. Epstein Jan 1992

Exit Rights Under Federalism, Richard A. Epstein

Law and Contemporary Problems

Exit rights and their self-help nature are discussed. State and federal courts should not allow state or provincial governments to destroy these important protections of individual property rights.


From “Cases” To “Litigation”, Judith Resnik Jul 1991

From “Cases” To “Litigation”, Judith Resnik

Law and Contemporary Problems

Changes in attitude and practice about the propriety of resolving cases in groups as part of one litigation are documented. The aggregation of civil cases is discussed.


“The One-Eyed Are Kings”: Improving Congress’S Ability To Regulate The Use Of Judicial Resources, Larry Kramer Jul 1991

“The One-Eyed Are Kings”: Improving Congress’S Ability To Regulate The Use Of Judicial Resources, Larry Kramer

Law and Contemporary Problems

Improving the ability of Congress to regulate the use of judicial resources is discussed. Reducing caseload growth in the federal courts, assuring that judicial resources are utilized effectively and a proposed agency that would structure jurisdiction under particular legislation are discussed.


A Judge’S View Of Congressional Action Affecting The Courts, Avern Cohn Jul 1991

A Judge’S View Of Congressional Action Affecting The Courts, Avern Cohn

Law and Contemporary Problems

A comment on Larry Kramer's article suggesting an addition to the mechanisms of congressional review of proposed legislation that has an impact on the work of federal courts is presented. The Office of Technology Assessment's present job for Congress in this respect is evaluated.


“Users United”: The Civil Justice Reform Act Of 1990, Jeffrey J. Peck Jul 1991

“Users United”: The Civil Justice Reform Act Of 1990, Jeffrey J. Peck

Law and Contemporary Problems

The implementation of the Civil Justice Reform Act of 1990, a law designed to improve the management of the civil justice system, is discussed. The substantive components of the law and the process that led to its enactment are addressed.


Science In The Court: Is There A Role For Alternative Dispute Resolution, Deborah R. Hensler Jul 1991

Science In The Court: Is There A Role For Alternative Dispute Resolution, Deborah R. Hensler

Law and Contemporary Problems

It is suggested that alternative dispute resolution procedures might remedy perceived problems in court procedures for dealing with scientific questions in medical malpractice, product liability and toxic tort litigation.


Mass Justice: The Limited And Unlimited Power Of Courts, Mark A. Peterson, Molly Selvin Jul 1991

Mass Justice: The Limited And Unlimited Power Of Courts, Mark A. Peterson, Molly Selvin

Law and Contemporary Problems

The role of courts in mass tort litigation is examined. The courts' interests in such cases, the power that courts have to aggregate claims, limits on that power and the flexibility that courts have to get around limits are discussed. Ways that courts' interests in resolving mass tort litigation interfere with judicial promulgation and consistent application of legal rules are also discussed.


Comment On Peterson And Selvin, Lea Brilmayer Jul 1991

Comment On Peterson And Selvin, Lea Brilmayer

Law and Contemporary Problems

A comment on an article by Peterson and Selvin dealing with the role of courts as participants in the resolution of mass tort cases is presented.


Aggregating Litigation, Ralph K. Winter Jul 1991

Aggregating Litigation, Ralph K. Winter

Law and Contemporary Problems

A comment on Judith Resnik's article on the aggregation of civil cases is presented. The goals of aggregating litigation and the very circumstances in which aggregation works best in achieving those goals are discussed. The aggregation of personal injury cases is also discussed.