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Full-Text Articles in Law

Teaching Legal Research And Writing With Actual Legal Work: Extending Clinical Education Into The First Year, Michael A. Millemann, Steven D. Schwinn Apr 2006

Teaching Legal Research And Writing With Actual Legal Work: Extending Clinical Education Into The First Year, Michael A. Millemann, Steven D. Schwinn

Faculty Scholarship

In this article, the co-authors argue that legal research and writing (LRW) teachers should use actual legal work to generate assignments. They recommend that clinical and LRW teachers work together to design, co-teach, and evaluate such courses. They describe two experimental courses they developed together and co-taught to support and clarify their arguments. They contend that actual legal work motivates students to learn the basic skills of research, analysis and writing, and thus helps to accomplish the primary goals of LRW courses. It also helps students to explore new dimensions of basic skills, including those related to the development and ...


Too Broke To Hire An Attorney - How To Conduct Basic Legal Research In A Law Library, Mike Martinez Jr, Michael P. Forrest Jan 2006

Too Broke To Hire An Attorney - How To Conduct Basic Legal Research In A Law Library, Mike Martinez Jr, Michael P. Forrest

Faculty Articles

This article targets as its audience pro se patrons - individuals who cannot afford counsel and need to conduct their own legal research. The poor and disenfranchised have historically had difficulty getting equal access to justice. The cause is often the fact that they cannot afford legal representation. This could lead to exclusion from the legal process. A solution might be self-representation, which presents its own difficulties, as the pro se litigant will likely need to access resources in a law library.


How Do You Know When Research Is Good?, Mary Whisner Jan 2006

How Do You Know When Research Is Good?, Mary Whisner

Librarians' Articles

Ms. Whisner explores the question of how to tell when research is good-or who is a good researcher


Cite Checking: A Brave New World, Susan Nevelow Mart Jan 2006

Cite Checking: A Brave New World, Susan Nevelow Mart

Articles

No abstract provided.


The Dictionary And The Man: Garner’S Black’S Law Dictionary, Jeanne Price, Roy M. Mersky Jan 2006

The Dictionary And The Man: Garner’S Black’S Law Dictionary, Jeanne Price, Roy M. Mersky

Scholarly Works

The 7th and 8th editions of Black's Law Dictionary were the first edited by Bryan Garner. This review of the 8th edition of Black's Law Dictionary focuses on the approach taken by Garner in thoroughly revising the dictionary and places his work in the context of the recent history of legal dictionaries and lexicography.


Fahrenheit 451on Cell Block D: A Bar Examination To Safeguard America’S Jailhouse Lawyers From The Post-Lewis Blaze Consuming Their Law Libraries, Evan R. Seamone Jan 2006

Fahrenheit 451on Cell Block D: A Bar Examination To Safeguard America’S Jailhouse Lawyers From The Post-Lewis Blaze Consuming Their Law Libraries, Evan R. Seamone

Journal Articles

No abstract provided.


Jewish Law For The Law Librarian, David Hollander Jan 2006

Jewish Law For The Law Librarian, David Hollander

Articles

Mr Hollander provides an introductory guide to the Jewish legal system with the intent of providing law librarians with the basic knowledge necessary to begin to help a patron conduct research in Jewish law.


Jewish Law For The Law Librarian, David Hollander Jan 2006

Jewish Law For The Law Librarian, David Hollander

Articles

Mr Hollander provides an introductory guide to the Jewish legal system with the intent of providing law librarians with the basic knowledge necessary to begin to help a patron conduct research in Jewish law.


Using Court Records For Research, Teaching, And Policymaking: The Civil Rights Litigation Clearinghouse, Margo Schlanger, Denise Lieberman Jan 2006

Using Court Records For Research, Teaching, And Policymaking: The Civil Rights Litigation Clearinghouse, Margo Schlanger, Denise Lieberman

Articles

The National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) is, wisely, planning the future of its enormous collection of relatively recent court records. The pertinent regulation, a “records disposition schedule” first issued in 1995 by the Judicial Conference of the United States in consultation with NARA, commits the Archives to keeping, permanently, all case files dated 1969 or earlier; all case files dated 1970 or later in which a trial was held, and “any civil case file which NARA has determined in consultation with court officials to have historical value.” Other files may be destroyed 20 years after they enter the federal ...