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2003

Science and Technology Law

The John Marshall Journal of Information Technology & Privacy Law

Articles 1 - 30 of 30

Full-Text Articles in Law

Copy Protection Of Cds: The Recording Industry's Latest Attempt At Preventing The Unauthorized Digital Distribution Of Music, 21 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 241 (2003), Amy K. Jensen Jan 2003

Copy Protection Of Cds: The Recording Industry's Latest Attempt At Preventing The Unauthorized Digital Distribution Of Music, 21 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 241 (2003), Amy K. Jensen

The John Marshall Journal of Information Technology & Privacy Law

This comment focuses on the need of the music industry to control the use and digital distribution of music. The author also addresses the privacy issues that arise through the various methods the music industry implements in order to control the unauthorized distribution of digital music via computer technology. The author particularly addresses the privacy issues that arise with the use of undetectable signals that send information about a consumer’s use of that Compact Disc over computer lines, all unbeknownst and unauthorized by the consumer.


Online Collaborative Media And Political Economy Of Information: A Case Study, 21 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 515 (2003), Caio M. S. Pereira Neto Jan 2003

Online Collaborative Media And Political Economy Of Information: A Case Study, 21 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 515 (2003), Caio M. S. Pereira Neto

The John Marshall Journal of Information Technology & Privacy Law

No abstract provided.


Spam Legislation In The United States, 22 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 3 (2003), David E. Sorkin Jan 2003

Spam Legislation In The United States, 22 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 3 (2003), David E. Sorkin

The John Marshall Journal of Information Technology & Privacy Law

This article examines the effect of spam legislation in the United States. It discusses state legislation and the common provisions of state spam legislation, such as disclosure and labeling requirements and opt-out provisions. It also analyzes the consequences of state anti-spam legislation. Federal legislation is analyzed, with a brief look at the CAN-SPAM Act of 2003. The article concludes that legislation has not had a big impact on spam, and the CAN-SPAM Act is not likely to change or curb spam.


Congress And The Courts Battle Over The First Amendment: Can The Law Really Protect Children From Pornography On The Internet?, 21 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 141 (2003), Mitchell P. Goldstein Jan 2003

Congress And The Courts Battle Over The First Amendment: Can The Law Really Protect Children From Pornography On The Internet?, 21 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 141 (2003), Mitchell P. Goldstein

The John Marshall Journal of Information Technology & Privacy Law

Litigation and court action have provided little in the way of providing solutions to anyone dealing with inappropriate content on the Internet. In Miller v. California, 413 U.S. 15 (1973). The court refused to establish a national standard and instead relied on community standards. Because the Internet has no geographic limitations, one cannot determine community standards because the Internet is so far reaching. Goldstein discusses in detail these Congressional enactments: Communications Decency Act of 1996, the Child Online Protection Act, and the Child Pornography Prevention Act of 1996, finding that none of them give children protection from pornography. The ...


Limiting Exposure For Internet Vendors: Separating The Wheat From The Chaff, 21 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 207 (2003), Todd V. Mackey Jan 2003

Limiting Exposure For Internet Vendors: Separating The Wheat From The Chaff, 21 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 207 (2003), Todd V. Mackey

The John Marshall Journal of Information Technology & Privacy Law

This article explains how using the Internet to market products may subject a vendor to exposure in unanticipated jurisdictions. The author includes a proposal to minimize those risks by suggesting the use of contracts of adhesion, including mandatory forum selection clauses, and having them executed by the customer in the course of the transaction so that the vendor may insulate itself from those jurisdictional risks.


Trade Secret Reclamation: An Equitable Approach In A Relative World, 21 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 227 (2003), William L. O'Brien Jan 2003

Trade Secret Reclamation: An Equitable Approach In A Relative World, 21 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 227 (2003), William L. O'Brien

The John Marshall Journal of Information Technology & Privacy Law

The only possible IP protection is a trade secret. However, trade secrets are inadvertently disclosed in investment disclosures or to prospective customers. The article offers a solution to this dilemma by creating emphasis on the continued retention of the secret, even though confidentiality of it could have been dissipating.


Cloning, Public Policy And The Constitution, 21 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 271 (2003), Lowell Ben Krahn Jan 2003

Cloning, Public Policy And The Constitution, 21 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 271 (2003), Lowell Ben Krahn

The John Marshall Journal of Information Technology & Privacy Law

This comment analyzes the safety and implications of human cloning, including whether cloning is encompassed by the fundamental right to privacy. The article also addresses the legislative attempts at banning cloning, and urges the government to do so.


Alcatel Usa, Inc. V. Brown: Does Your Boss Own Your Brain?, 21 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 295 (2003), Jim C. Lai Jan 2003

Alcatel Usa, Inc. V. Brown: Does Your Boss Own Your Brain?, 21 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 295 (2003), Jim C. Lai

The John Marshall Journal of Information Technology & Privacy Law

Critizing the Alcatel USA, Inc. v. Brown court’s holding that a company owned rights to a software idea that existed entirely in the thoughts of one of it’s former employee’s. Discusses how the court did not take into account that (1) the invention disclosure agreement it secured from the employer was unenforceable, (2) the Solution was not an “invention” as recognized by U.S. intellectual property law, and (3) the development of an automatic decompiler was not within the scope of the company’s business or employee’s work. Arguing while it is reasonable for an employer ...


Curbing Copyright Infringement In Cyberspace: Using Mediakey To Stop The Bleeding, 21 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 325 (2003), John R. Perkins Jr. Jan 2003

Curbing Copyright Infringement In Cyberspace: Using Mediakey To Stop The Bleeding, 21 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 325 (2003), John R. Perkins Jr.

The John Marshall Journal of Information Technology & Privacy Law

This article discusses a solution to copyright infringement on the Internet. The solution combines legal and technical aspects so the solution is very specific but also practical. The paper proposes a solution to use technological protection similar to that found in the federal statute prohibiting circumvention of technological protection measures. The paper then concludes with how difficult his solution and other proposed changes will be to enact because of opposition it will receive from many sides.


The Anticybersquatting Consumer Protection Act: An Analysis Of The Decisions From The Courts Of Appeals, 21 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 355 (2003), Sue Ann Mota Jan 2003

The Anticybersquatting Consumer Protection Act: An Analysis Of The Decisions From The Courts Of Appeals, 21 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 355 (2003), Sue Ann Mota

The John Marshall Journal of Information Technology & Privacy Law

This article examines the published decisions of the First, Second, Third, Fourth, Sixth, and Ninth Circuit Courts of Appeals in which there have been interpretations of the Anticybersquatting Consumer Protection Act (APCA). The article provides summaries of all cases interpreting the ACPA at the time of writing. These cases include: Sporty’s Farm L.L.C. v. Sportman’s Market, Inc.; Northern Light Technology, Inc. v. Northern Lights Club; Sallen v. Corinthians Licenciamentos LTDA; Shields v. Zuccarini; Virtual Works, Inc. v. Volkswagen of America, Inc.; People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals v. Doughney; Porsche Cars North America, Inc. v ...


Caging The Bird Does Not Cage The Song: How The International Covenant On Civil And Political Rights Fails To Protect Free Expression Over The Internet, 21 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 371 (2003), Antoine L. Collins Jan 2003

Caging The Bird Does Not Cage The Song: How The International Covenant On Civil And Political Rights Fails To Protect Free Expression Over The Internet, 21 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 371 (2003), Antoine L. Collins

The John Marshall Journal of Information Technology & Privacy Law

This comment addresses the right to free speech on the Internet. The International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, an instrument designed to protect the rights of individuals to free speech and expression, is analyzed for effectiveness. The author argues that the “ICCPR”, the most recent international human rights agreement, does not adequately protect Internet users, particularly from governments that may choose to violate citizens’ rights by interfering with computerized communications. The analysis of the “ICCPR” illustrates the purpose, capabilities and weaknesses of the agreement, and offers proposed changes to the act, to protect the rights of both the individual ...


The “Cost” Of Securing Domestic Air Travel, 21 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 405 (2003), Eric J. Miller Jan 2003

The “Cost” Of Securing Domestic Air Travel, 21 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 405 (2003), Eric J. Miller

The John Marshall Journal of Information Technology & Privacy Law

This comment explores the security measures utilized for airline travel. Early airport security is compared to post 911 airport security. Various traveler search methods are analyzed against the backdrop of the Fourth and Fifth Amendments. Included is an analysis of effectiveness, legality, and policy considerations of current security measures. Finally, the author proposes alternative security measures addressing the effectiveness, legality and policy considerations of such proposed solutions.


Are You Content With The Content? Intellectual Property Implications Of Weblog Publishing, 21 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 439 (2003), Attiya Malik Jan 2003

Are You Content With The Content? Intellectual Property Implications Of Weblog Publishing, 21 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 439 (2003), Attiya Malik

The John Marshall Journal of Information Technology & Privacy Law

The publicity about weblogs has neglected to warn against the risks of legal liability. Whether you want to impart words of wisdom or copy something that caught your interest, the temptation to "borrow" is too great and too easy in Cyberspace. Whereas the typical Internet user may have heard of "copyright" or "trademark," they are unaware of the complexities and nuances of these areas of law. The legal tests and standards may be too sophisticated for the average user. Even practitioners and courts are grappling with what legal standards and interpretations are to be applied in Cyberspace, thus, leading to ...


International Data Transfer Out Of The European Union: The Adequate Level Of Data Protection According To Article 25 Of The European Data Protection Directive, 21 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 553 (2003), Alexander Zinser Jan 2003

International Data Transfer Out Of The European Union: The Adequate Level Of Data Protection According To Article 25 Of The European Data Protection Directive, 21 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 553 (2003), Alexander Zinser

The John Marshall Journal of Information Technology & Privacy Law

Article 25 of the European Data Protection Directive provides a set of standards that are to be used by countries in the European Union when personal data processed in the particular member country transfers such information to third countries. This directive dictates that it must be ascertained, before transferring such personal information, that the third country ensures an adequate level of protection. Zinser initially examines the history and scope of Article 25 of the European Data Protection Directive before examining each of the standards and factors contained therein, with regard to the transfer of such information. He offers analysis of ...


Expanding The Dmca: The Importance Of Regulating Computer Code, 21 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 575 (2003), Luke Antonsen Jan 2003

Expanding The Dmca: The Importance Of Regulating Computer Code, 21 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 575 (2003), Luke Antonsen

The John Marshall Journal of Information Technology & Privacy Law

No abstract provided.


Locked Out: The New Hazards Of Reverse Engineering, 21 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 601 (2003), Carla Meninsky Jan 2003

Locked Out: The New Hazards Of Reverse Engineering, 21 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 601 (2003), Carla Meninsky

The John Marshall Journal of Information Technology & Privacy Law

In this article, Meninsky contends the technological practice of reverse engineering of replacements parts and other interoperable products, which has been used to circumvent digital locks and otherwise gain access to copyrighted material and information protected as trade secrets, has been upheld by courts as fair use. This practice is discussed within the context of the Digital Millenium Copyright Act (“DMCA”), which prohibits methods employed to “circumvent a technological measure that effectively controls access to a copyrighted work” while providing a limited exemption for reverse engineers in certain circumstances. Meninsky finds that the DMCA, in effect, thwarts competition, stunts technological ...


Where's The Beef? Dissecting Spam's Purported Harms, 22 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 13 (2003), Eric Goldman Jan 2003

Where's The Beef? Dissecting Spam's Purported Harms, 22 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 13 (2003), Eric Goldman

The John Marshall Journal of Information Technology & Privacy Law

This article seeks to identify areas that truly require legislative intervention by examining the harms purportedly caused by spam. Identifying exactly what constitutes spam is an imprecise task since one e-mail may be junk to one and an important e-mail to another. The article attempts to analyze why consumers feel strongly against spam. This reaction is compared to consumers’ comparatively tolerant reaction to other unwanted advertisement in different mediums, such as billboards or magazine advertisements. Several factors are considered, such as the waste of time associated with sorting spam, the loss of consumers’ control over their in-boxes, and the annoyance ...


After Can-Spam, How States Can Stay Relevant In The Fight Against Unwanted Messages:How A Children's Protection Registry Can Be Effective And Is Not Preempted, Under The New Federal Anti-Spam Law, 22 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 29 (2003), Matthew B. Prince Jan 2003

After Can-Spam, How States Can Stay Relevant In The Fight Against Unwanted Messages:How A Children's Protection Registry Can Be Effective And Is Not Preempted, Under The New Federal Anti-Spam Law, 22 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 29 (2003), Matthew B. Prince

The John Marshall Journal of Information Technology & Privacy Law

The recipe for success to combat unsolicited and unwanted e-mail, otherwise known as spam, has not yet been formulated by the thirty-six states that have tried by enacting their own versions of anti-spam laws. Only two state prosecutions were ever successfully brought against spammers, and only one was able to enforce its law against an out-of-state spammer. Now, on the federal level, with the passing of the CAN-SPAM act, which essentially rehashes what states have attempted to do, the failure to provide any significant measure of national success against spam seems likely. However, a careful reading of the language of ...


The Do-Not-Call Registry Model Is Not The Answer To Spam, 22 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 79 (2003), Richard C. Balough Jan 2003

The Do-Not-Call Registry Model Is Not The Answer To Spam, 22 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 79 (2003), Richard C. Balough

The John Marshall Journal of Information Technology & Privacy Law

This article discusses why a system to combat unwanted Internet spam, or junk e-mail, should not be modeled after the Do-Not-Call registry developed to curtail telemarketing phone calls. The Do-Not-Call registry is an "opt-out" system where consumers must place their phone numbers on a list that designates them as consumers unwilling to accept telemarketing calls. In the Internet spam context, this article argues that to force Internet users to place their e-mail addresses on a similar do-not-spam list could lead to potential problems. For example, if a would-be spammer was to get a hold of that list, she or he ...


Spamming For Legal Services: A Constitutional Right Within A Regulatory Quagmire, 22 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 97 (2003), William E. Hornsby, Jr. Jan 2003

Spamming For Legal Services: A Constitutional Right Within A Regulatory Quagmire, 22 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 97 (2003), William E. Hornsby, Jr.

The John Marshall Journal of Information Technology & Privacy Law

This article addresses the regulatory schemes applied to lawyers who advertise their legal services to consumers through electronic communications. Concerns have arisen about lawyers using electronic communications to offer their services to their targeted communities. Since the Supreme Court’s 1977 decision in Bates, lawyers have been able to advertise their services without state permission. However, states have imposed ethical regulations in an effort to ensure that lawyers do not over reach their boundaries during such advertising efforts. The question is raised as to whether states’ spam rules also apply to lawyers who choose to advertise over the Internet. This ...


Examination Of The Model Rules Of Professional Conduct Pertaining To The Marketing Of Legal Services In Cyberspace, 22 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 113 (2003), Matthew T. Rollins Jan 2003

Examination Of The Model Rules Of Professional Conduct Pertaining To The Marketing Of Legal Services In Cyberspace, 22 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 113 (2003), Matthew T. Rollins

The John Marshall Journal of Information Technology & Privacy Law

Advancements in technology have allowed lawyers to reach new and bigger audiences. As a result, the American Bar Association (ABA) modified the Model Rules of Professional Conduct to provide a guideline lawyers can follow regarding the propriety of marketing their legal services over the Internet. This article examines the changes in the Model Rules and the effects of these changes on lawyers advertising their legal services on the Internet. Also discussed are the issues of whether anti-spam laws are binding on lawyers and whether it is proper for lawyers to advertise over the Internet. The ban on chat room solicitation ...


Vendor Liability For Advertising In Unsolicited Commercial E-Mail, 22 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 137 (2003), Anne P. Mitchell Jan 2003

Vendor Liability For Advertising In Unsolicited Commercial E-Mail, 22 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 137 (2003), Anne P. Mitchell

The John Marshall Journal of Information Technology & Privacy Law

This article discusses whether vendors should be held liable for spam. Vendors are those companies whose products or services are being peddled in spam advertising. Yet, vendors disclaim responsibility for the issuance of spam because they were not the ones who actually sent the spam in the first place. This article takes the stance that because vendors contribute and or benefit from the wrongful acts of the actual spammers, vendors should not be able to escape liability by blaming the primary actors, the spammers. Further, if vendors were to be held liable for spam, they would be an easier entity ...


Spam And Beyond: Freedom, Efficiency, And The Regulation Of E-Mail Advertising, 22 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 141 (2003), Richard Warner Jan 2003

Spam And Beyond: Freedom, Efficiency, And The Regulation Of E-Mail Advertising, 22 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 141 (2003), Richard Warner

The John Marshall Journal of Information Technology & Privacy Law

Traditional forms of mailing advertisers bear the full cost of delivering advertisements to consumers. However, this is not true in the form of all e-mail advertisement, spam or not. E-mail users subsidize part of any e-mail advertisement, thereby splitting costs between advertiser and the consumer who receives the e-mail advertisement. This article takes the position that the subsidization that occurs in e-mail advertisement should be eliminated because it unjustifiably violates individual freedom. The article discusses why the delivery charges between sender and recipient are divided, why such cost-division violates freedom, and whether the violation is justified. The article also defines ...


A Further Darkside To Unsolicited Commercial E-Mail? An Assessment Of Potential Employer Liability For Spam E-Mail, 22 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 179 (2003), Ben Dahl Jan 2003

A Further Darkside To Unsolicited Commercial E-Mail? An Assessment Of Potential Employer Liability For Spam E-Mail, 22 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 179 (2003), Ben Dahl

The John Marshall Journal of Information Technology & Privacy Law

This article looks at employer liability for pornographic spam in the workplace. It begins with an analysis of the risks and unique problems posed by employees’ Internet use while at work. The article makes note of some trouble areas where employers may be held vicariously liable for sexual harassment. It is suggested that employers protect themselves by taking steps to: 1) reduce the prevalence of unsolicited commercial e-mail in the workplace; 2) mute the potential harm of offensive e-mail; and 3) create a paper trail indicating diligence in the fight to protect employees. Employers may reach these goals by the ...


Intel V. Hamidi: Spam As A Trespass To Chattels - Deconstruction Of A Private Right Of Action In California, 22 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 205 (2003), J. Brian Beckham Jan 2003

Intel V. Hamidi: Spam As A Trespass To Chattels - Deconstruction Of A Private Right Of Action In California, 22 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 205 (2003), J. Brian Beckham

The John Marshall Journal of Information Technology & Privacy Law

This casenote analyzes and critiques the decision reached by the California Supreme Court in Intel v. Hamidi. Intel v. Hamidi runs contrary to other cases that have found a cause of action for trespass to chattels where harm was caused by unwanted electronic communications: Thrifty-Tel, Inc. v. Benezek, eBay v. Bidder’s Edge, and CompuServe v. Cyber Promotions. The California Supreme Court in Intel v. Hamidi suggested other causes of action Intel could have brought instead of trespass to chattels. The casenote looks at each proffered alternative and concludes that none of the alternatives were feasible and that Intel should ...


Wireless Spam This Way Comes: An Analysis Of The Spread Of Wireless Spam And The Present And Proposed Measures Taken To Stop It, 22 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 229 (2003), Bridget O'Neill Jan 2003

Wireless Spam This Way Comes: An Analysis Of The Spread Of Wireless Spam And The Present And Proposed Measures Taken To Stop It, 22 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 229 (2003), Bridget O'Neill

The John Marshall Journal of Information Technology & Privacy Law

Spam in the form of unsolicited unwanted e-mail is already a recognized concern in the United States. However, a different type of spam, wireless spam, is starting to make its way to the United States. Wireless spam targets items cell phones with text messaging capabilities, pagers, and personal digital assistants (PDAs). These devices tend to be heavily relied on by their respective owners who bring these devices wherever they go, so to receive wireless spam represents a greater level of privacy intrusion. This article analyzes the various legislative measures that have been considered to regulate spam. It recognizes that most ...


2003 John Marshall International Moot Court Competition In Information Technology And Privacy Law: Bench Memorandum, 22 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 247 (2003), Terry Fernbach Jan 2003

2003 John Marshall International Moot Court Competition In Information Technology And Privacy Law: Bench Memorandum, 22 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 247 (2003), Terry Fernbach

The John Marshall Journal of Information Technology & Privacy Law

No abstract provided.


2003 John Marshall International Moot Court Competition In Information Technology And Privacy Law: Brief For The Petitioner, 22 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 261 (2003), Abby K. Lill, Leopold E. Wetula, Nathan J. Wills Jan 2003

2003 John Marshall International Moot Court Competition In Information Technology And Privacy Law: Brief For The Petitioner, 22 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 261 (2003), Abby K. Lill, Leopold E. Wetula, Nathan J. Wills

The John Marshall Journal of Information Technology & Privacy Law

No abstract provided.


2003 John Marshall International Moot Court Competition In Information Technology And Privacy Law: Brief For The Petitioner, 22 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 301 (2003), Daniel Crespo, Ryan Levine, Brian Walters Jan 2003

2003 John Marshall International Moot Court Competition In Information Technology And Privacy Law: Brief For The Petitioner, 22 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 301 (2003), Daniel Crespo, Ryan Levine, Brian Walters

The John Marshall Journal of Information Technology & Privacy Law

No abstract provided.


2003 John Marshall International Moot Court Competition In Information Technology And Privacy Law: Brief For The Respondent, 22 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 335 (2003), Steven Anderson, Chad Edgington, Shannon Goss Jan 2003

2003 John Marshall International Moot Court Competition In Information Technology And Privacy Law: Brief For The Respondent, 22 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 335 (2003), Steven Anderson, Chad Edgington, Shannon Goss

The John Marshall Journal of Information Technology & Privacy Law

No abstract provided.