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2001

Courts

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Law and Contemporary Problems

Articles 1 - 5 of 5

Full-Text Articles in Law

The International Criminal Court: Current Issues And Perspectives, Philippe Kirsch Q.C. Jan 2001

The International Criminal Court: Current Issues And Perspectives, Philippe Kirsch Q.C.

Law and Contemporary Problems

The creation of a permanent international criminal court (ICC) has been seen as a desirable objective for a long time, but its implementation is hampered by controversy. Proponents of the court believe that the ICC has great potential to render justice in cases of genocide, war crimes, and crimes against humanity, and to deter the future perpetration of those crimes. Skeptics question the wisdom of placing the power to adjudicate highly politically charged cases into the hands of an international tribunal.


International Criminal Law After Rome: Concerns From A U.S. Military Perspective, William K. Lietzau Jan 2001

International Criminal Law After Rome: Concerns From A U.S. Military Perspective, William K. Lietzau

Law and Contemporary Problems

Lietzau argues that the US cannot support the International Criminal Court because it fails to recognize its unique responsibilities in the world when issues of international peace and security are involved. The changes sought by the US in the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court should be implemented not just because US participation is key to an effective, functioning court, but because enacting them promotes the rule of law and is therefore the right thing to do.


The Risks And Weaknesses Of The International Criminal Court From America’S Perspective, John R. Bolton Jan 2001

The Risks And Weaknesses Of The International Criminal Court From America’S Perspective, John R. Bolton

Law and Contemporary Problems

Bolton argues the US should raise its objections to the International Criminal Court (ICC) on every appropriate occasion, as part of its larger campaign to assert American interests against stifling, illegitimate, and unacceptable international agreements. The US has many alternative foreign policy instruments to utilize that are fully consistent with US interests, leaving the ICC to the obscurity it richly deserves.


The International Criminal Court: Issues For Consideration By The United States Senate, Patricia Mcnerney Jan 2001

The International Criminal Court: Issues For Consideration By The United States Senate, Patricia Mcnerney

Law and Contemporary Problems

McNerney states that many in Congress who oppose the International Criminal Court are also some of the stronger advocates of the US speaking out against human rights abuses around the world. Rather than advocating the creation of an international criminal court that attempts to take decision making authority away from governments and invalidate the rule of law, however, they argue that more should be done to facilitate extradition of criminals to stand trial where they are accused.


The Irresolution Of Rome, Ruth Wedgwood Jan 2001

The Irresolution Of Rome, Ruth Wedgwood

Law and Contemporary Problems

Wedgwood argues that it would be a pity to allow international misjudgment of the long-term security environment to generate a disregard for the constructive tasks of American military power, and fatally hobble shared support for an effective criminal tribunal. American Senators and military leaders--and the American public--will want to see how the International Criminal Court works in practice before considering the possibility of full ratification and formal membership. If this "look-over" period is not safe, the advocates seeking a "war on the court" may win the day.