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2001

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Full-Text Articles in Law

Burdine V. Johnson -- To Sleep, Perchance To Get A New Trial: Presumed Prejudice Arising From Sleeping Counsel, James M. Donovan Dec 2001

Burdine V. Johnson -- To Sleep, Perchance To Get A New Trial: Presumed Prejudice Arising From Sleeping Counsel, James M. Donovan

James M. Donovan

Few images slice as deeply into our self-image as a fair society than that of a defendant on trial for his very life depending upon the services of an attorney who naps throughout the proceedings. Although this scenario is not new, the courts have yet to resolve definitively how they should respond to a defendant burdened with snoozing counsel. This note discusses the outcome of the latest attempt. UPDATE: While a conscious lawyer is presumably a requirement of due process, some jurisdictions make no similar demand that judges remain awake: see http://www.austlii.edu.au/au/cases/nsw/NSWCCA ...


Burdine V. Johnson -- To Sleep, Perchance To Get A New Trial: Presumed Prejudice Arising From Sleeping Counsel, James M. Donovan Dec 2001

Burdine V. Johnson -- To Sleep, Perchance To Get A New Trial: Presumed Prejudice Arising From Sleeping Counsel, James M. Donovan

Law Faculty Scholarly Articles

Few images slice as deeply into our self-image as a fair society than that of a defendant on trial for his very life depending upon the services of an attorney who naps throughout the proceedings. Although this scenario is not new, the courts have yet to resolve definitively how they should respond to a defendant burdened with snoozing counsel. This note discusses the outcome of the latest attempt. UPDATE: While a conscious lawyer is presumably a requirement of due process, some jurisdictions make no similar demand that judges remain awake: see http://www.austlii.edu.au/au/cases/nsw/NSWCCA ...


From Common Law To Civil Law Jurisdictions: Court Adr On The Move In Germany, Nadja Alexander Dec 2001

From Common Law To Civil Law Jurisdictions: Court Adr On The Move In Germany, Nadja Alexander

Research Collection School Of Law

In Australia today, ADR processes are recognised not only as a distinct system of dispute resolution, but also as a system that interacts interdependently with the legal system. This is most clearly demonstrated in the context of court-related mediation, which is increasingly seen as an effective way to increase access to, participation in, and satisfaction with the way legal disputes are resolved. Cappelletti categorises ADR as the third wave in the worldwide access-to-justice movement. ADR provides a different approach and a different sort of justice for solving disputes — what Cappelletti labels ‘co-existential justice’.


The Courtroom Technology Wars Are Here!, Fredric I. Lederer Dec 2001

The Courtroom Technology Wars Are Here!, Fredric I. Lederer

Popular Media

No abstract provided.


Discriminatory Housing Statements And §3604(C): A New Look At The Fair Housing Act’S Most Intriguing Provision, Robert G. Schwemm Oct 2001

Discriminatory Housing Statements And §3604(C): A New Look At The Fair Housing Act’S Most Intriguing Provision, Robert G. Schwemm

Law Faculty Scholarly Articles

Today, more than three decades after the 1968 Fair Housing Act ("FHA") banned such behavior, blatant discrimination—often accompanied by racist slurs and other explicitly discriminatory statements—continues to plague America's housing markets. The FHA not only outlawed discrimination in most housing transactions on the basis of race, color, religion, and national origin, but also contained a specific prohibition, § 3604(c), banning all discriminatory housing statements. Unlike the FHA's more traditional prohibitions against discriminatory refusals to deal and discriminatory terms and conditions, § 3604(c)'s ban on discriminatory statements has not been the subject of much litigation or ...


Monroe County, Kentucky - Records, 1838-1857 (Mss 61), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives Aug 2001

Monroe County, Kentucky - Records, 1838-1857 (Mss 61), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid only for Manuscripts Collection 61. Docket books, 1838-1876 (3), kept by J. Gee, justice of the peace of Monroe County, Kentucky; miscellaneous papers found in books, 1838-post 1952 (20); and record book kept by B. C. Maxey of Barren County, Kentucky, which contains Gee family history, Maxey cemetery records, etc., 1925-1957.


Rethink The Laws Relating To Fathers (Change: With The Decline In Married Mothers And Traditional Families, The Legal Image Of Dads Needs Re-Examination), Jane C. Murphy Jun 2001

Rethink The Laws Relating To Fathers (Change: With The Decline In Married Mothers And Traditional Families, The Legal Image Of Dads Needs Re-Examination), Jane C. Murphy

All Faculty Scholarship

This "marital presumption" permitted courts to assume a set of biological facts in the name of preserving the sanctity and stability of what was assumed to be the cornerstone of a healthy society — the traditional family of husband, wife and children. In the last decades of the 20th century, science developed paternity testing with results approaching certainty. Despite the availability of DNA testing, the marital presumption is still used in many courtrooms to answer the question of who is the legal father. What one scholar has called "the law's struggle to preserve the fiction of an older moral order ...


Slow And Steady Does Not Always Win The Race: The Nuremberg Files Web Site And What It Should Teach Us About Incitement And The Internet, Nadine E. Mcspadden Apr 2001

Slow And Steady Does Not Always Win The Race: The Nuremberg Files Web Site And What It Should Teach Us About Incitement And The Internet, Nadine E. Mcspadden

Indiana Law Journal

No abstract provided.


The Courts And Legislation: Anglo-American Contrasts (George P. Smith, Ii, Distinguished Professorship-Chair Of Law), Sir David Williams David Q. C. Apr 2001

The Courts And Legislation: Anglo-American Contrasts (George P. Smith, Ii, Distinguished Professorship-Chair Of Law), Sir David Williams David Q. C.

Indiana Journal of Global Legal Studies

On April 12, 2000, Sir David Williams delivered the following lecture at the Indiana School of Law-Bloomington in accordance with The George P. Smith, II, Distinguished Visiting Professorship-Chair of Law and Legal Research endowment. The Chair was established by George P. Smith to broaden students' exposure to scholars and judges of national and international reputation and to allow distinguished visiting scholars the opportunity to do research at Indiana University and share their ideas with the faculty and students of the Indiana University School of Law and Indiana University. George P. Smith, an Indiana native, received his B.S. degree in ...


The Judiciary In The United States: A Search For Fairness, Independence And Competence, Stephen J. Shapiro Apr 2001

The Judiciary In The United States: A Search For Fairness, Independence And Competence, Stephen J. Shapiro

All Faculty Scholarship

Alexander Hamilton referred to the judiciary as “the least dangerous branch” because it could neither make nor enforce the law without help from the other two branches of government. In the years since then, however, courts and judges in the United States have assumed a much more prominent role in society. American judges preside over criminal trials and sentence those convicted, decide all kinds of civil disputes, both large and small, and make important decisions involving families, such as child custody. They have also become the primary guarantors of the civil and constitutional rights of American citizens.

The case of ...


Juries And Technology: Equipping Jurors For The Twenty-First Century (Symposium), Nancy S. Marder Feb 2001

Juries And Technology: Equipping Jurors For The Twenty-First Century (Symposium), Nancy S. Marder

All Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Juries And Technology: Equipping Jurors For The Twenty-First Century (Symposium), Nancy S. Marder Jan 2001

Juries And Technology: Equipping Jurors For The Twenty-First Century (Symposium), Nancy S. Marder

Nancy S. Marder

No abstract provided.


Managing Punitive Damages: A Role For Mandatory "Limited Generosity" Classes And Anti-Suit Injunctions?, Joan E. Steinman Jan 2001

Managing Punitive Damages: A Role For Mandatory "Limited Generosity" Classes And Anti-Suit Injunctions?, Joan E. Steinman

All Faculty Scholarship

In this Article, I consider whether "limited generosity" classes may be used to determine a defendant's entire liability for punitive damages arising from a defined course of conduct. The goals of such a class action would include adequately punishing and deterring the defendant, keeping the defendant's liability within state-mandated and constitutional limits, and facilitating equitable distribution of the damages among injured plaintiffs. The Article describes the legal limits on punitive damages liability that states have established and that the Supreme Court has held substantive due process to impose, and then carefully examines whether such limits constitute a predicate ...


Indian Religious Freedom: To Litigate Or Legislate?, Louis Fisher Jan 2001

Indian Religious Freedom: To Litigate Or Legislate?, Louis Fisher

American Indian Law Review

No abstract provided.


Report Of The Judiciary And The Courts Working Group, Nanette Schorr Jan 2001

Report Of The Judiciary And The Courts Working Group, Nanette Schorr

Fordham Law Review

No abstract provided.


Accountability And International Actors In Bosnia And Herzegovina, Kosovo And East Timor, Ralph Wilde Jan 2001

Accountability And International Actors In Bosnia And Herzegovina, Kosovo And East Timor, Ralph Wilde

ILSA Journal of International & Comparative Law

Current international involvement in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Kosovo and East Timor has two elements.


The Overwhelming Case For Elimination Of The Integration Doctrine Under The Securities Act Of 1933, Rutheford B. Campbell Jr. Jan 2001

The Overwhelming Case For Elimination Of The Integration Doctrine Under The Securities Act Of 1933, Rutheford B. Campbell Jr.

Law Faculty Scholarly Articles

The thesis of this Article is that the Securities and Exchange Commission should entirely eliminate the integration doctrine from the Securities Act of1933. Under the integration doctrine, a single "offering" or "issue" of securities cannot be split. The doctrine is expensive for society and furthers no valid policy of the 1933 Act. More specifically, the doctrine does not promote investor protection but does retard capital formation, an outcome that is contrary to the presently articulated purposes of the 1933 Act.

Part II of this Article traces the history of the adoption of the integration doctrine both by the Commission and ...


From Gender Apartheid To Non-Sexism: The Pursuit Of Women's Rights In South Africa, Penelope Andrews Jan 2001

From Gender Apartheid To Non-Sexism: The Pursuit Of Women's Rights In South Africa, Penelope Andrews

Articles & Chapters

This article discusses the quest for women's rights in South Africa and how the transition from apartheid to democracy led to a commitment to gender equality as incorporated in South Africa's transitional and final Constitutions. This paper refers to the organizational attempts by women prior to and during the constitutional drafting process to ensure that the new Constitution embodied the aspirations and reflected the struggles for women's rights by women activists in South Africa. This article is divided into six sections. Section Two describes the legacy of apartheid for all women in South Africa. This section shows ...


The International Criminal Court: Current Issues And Perspectives, Philippe Kirsch Q.C. Jan 2001

The International Criminal Court: Current Issues And Perspectives, Philippe Kirsch Q.C.

Law and Contemporary Problems

The creation of a permanent international criminal court (ICC) has been seen as a desirable objective for a long time, but its implementation is hampered by controversy. Proponents of the court believe that the ICC has great potential to render justice in cases of genocide, war crimes, and crimes against humanity, and to deter the future perpetration of those crimes. Skeptics question the wisdom of placing the power to adjudicate highly politically charged cases into the hands of an international tribunal.


International Criminal Law After Rome: Concerns From A U.S. Military Perspective, William K. Lietzau Jan 2001

International Criminal Law After Rome: Concerns From A U.S. Military Perspective, William K. Lietzau

Law and Contemporary Problems

Lietzau argues that the US cannot support the International Criminal Court because it fails to recognize its unique responsibilities in the world when issues of international peace and security are involved. The changes sought by the US in the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court should be implemented not just because US participation is key to an effective, functioning court, but because enacting them promotes the rule of law and is therefore the right thing to do.


The Risks And Weaknesses Of The International Criminal Court From America’S Perspective, John R. Bolton Jan 2001

The Risks And Weaknesses Of The International Criminal Court From America’S Perspective, John R. Bolton

Law and Contemporary Problems

Bolton argues the US should raise its objections to the International Criminal Court (ICC) on every appropriate occasion, as part of its larger campaign to assert American interests against stifling, illegitimate, and unacceptable international agreements. The US has many alternative foreign policy instruments to utilize that are fully consistent with US interests, leaving the ICC to the obscurity it richly deserves.


The International Criminal Court: Issues For Consideration By The United States Senate, Patricia Mcnerney Jan 2001

The International Criminal Court: Issues For Consideration By The United States Senate, Patricia Mcnerney

Law and Contemporary Problems

McNerney states that many in Congress who oppose the International Criminal Court are also some of the stronger advocates of the US speaking out against human rights abuses around the world. Rather than advocating the creation of an international criminal court that attempts to take decision making authority away from governments and invalidate the rule of law, however, they argue that more should be done to facilitate extradition of criminals to stand trial where they are accused.


The Irresolution Of Rome, Ruth Wedgwood Jan 2001

The Irresolution Of Rome, Ruth Wedgwood

Law and Contemporary Problems

Wedgwood argues that it would be a pity to allow international misjudgment of the long-term security environment to generate a disregard for the constructive tasks of American military power, and fatally hobble shared support for an effective criminal tribunal. American Senators and military leaders--and the American public--will want to see how the International Criminal Court works in practice before considering the possibility of full ratification and formal membership. If this "look-over" period is not safe, the advocates seeking a "war on the court" may win the day.


Gender Based Violence As Judicial Anomaly: Between "The Truly National And The Truly Local", Deborah M. Weissman Jan 2001

Gender Based Violence As Judicial Anomaly: Between "The Truly National And The Truly Local", Deborah M. Weissman

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Making Progress The Old-Fashioned Way, Stephen B. Burbank Jan 2001

Making Progress The Old-Fashioned Way, Stephen B. Burbank

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


Using § 1983 To Enforce Title Vi's Section 602 Regulations, Bradford Mank Jan 2001

Using § 1983 To Enforce Title Vi's Section 602 Regulations, Bradford Mank

Faculty Articles and Other Publications

This Article examines the circumstances under which § 1983 suits may be used to enforce agency regulations in general, and Title VI's disparate impact regulations in particular.


Bringing The Camel Into The Tent: State And Federal Power Over Electricity Transmission , Cassandra Burke Robertson Jan 2001

Bringing The Camel Into The Tent: State And Federal Power Over Electricity Transmission , Cassandra Burke Robertson

Cleveland State Law Review

This paper provides a framework for understanding the current controversy regarding jurisdiction over the power grid, and provides policy-oriented solutions to ensure an adequate, low-cost transmission supply. The main thesis of this paper is that sound transmission policy requires greater federal power, and that Congress is better equipped than the courts to enact such policy. To this end, Part I of the paper offers an historical outline of the problem and analyzes the statutes and regulations that form the backbone of both the federal and state jurisdictional claims. Part II looks at legal considerations regarding the scope of federal jurisdiction ...


Judicial Fact-Finding And Sentence Enhancements In A World Of Guilty Pleas, Stephanos Bibas Jan 2001

Judicial Fact-Finding And Sentence Enhancements In A World Of Guilty Pleas, Stephanos Bibas

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


Interpretive Communities: The Missing Element In Statutory Interpretation, William S. Blatt Jan 2001

Interpretive Communities: The Missing Element In Statutory Interpretation, William S. Blatt

Articles

No abstract provided.


Making Deals In Court-Connected Mediation: What's Justice Got To Do With It?, Nancy A. Welsh Jan 2001

Making Deals In Court-Connected Mediation: What's Justice Got To Do With It?, Nancy A. Welsh

Faculty Scholarship

When mediation was first introduced to the courts, the process was hailed as “alternative.” Mediation gave disputants the opportunity to discuss and resolve their dispute themselves; the role of the third party was to facilitate the disputants’ negotiations, not to dictate the outcome; and because the disputants were able to focus on their underlying interests in mediation, the process could result in creative, customized solutions. The picture of mediation is changing, however, as the process settles into its role as a tool for the resolution of personal injury, contract, and other nonfamily cases on the courts’ civil dockets. Attorneys dominate ...