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Vol. 44, No. 6, November 22, 1993, University Of Michigan Law School Nov 1993

Vol. 44, No. 6, November 22, 1993, University Of Michigan Law School

Res Gestae

•'Boycott Colorado' Efforts Continue •Student Senate Responds to Racism Charges •LSSS Election Debacle Provides Instructive Lesson •Are Law Students 'Hissing' to be Clever in Class? •Excessive Posting Mars Halls of Academe •Alumnus Decries Moot Court Board Decision •Voluntary Imprisonment: The Life of a Prison Guard •The Docket •Catsup Please! Tater Tots Overrun Phid House •Study Hints for the Efficient Student •TV, Movies Offer Widely Divergent Choices •1st Annual Most Annoying Law Students Awards •Law in the Raw


Vol. 44, No. 5, November 8, 1993, University Of Michigan Law School Nov 1993

Vol. 44, No. 5, November 8, 1993, University Of Michigan Law School

Res Gestae

•Moot Court Disqualifies 13 late Teams •An Interview with Patricia White •Journal of Gender & Law Approaches First Issues •Student Access LSSS of Botching First-Year Elections •The Docket •The Mailbag: Advice for the Lovelorn •The Lewdicrous and Profane: How 3Ls Kill Time


Vol. 44, No. 4, October 25, 1993, University Of Michigan Law School Oct 1993

Vol. 44, No. 4, October 25, 1993, University Of Michigan Law School

Res Gestae

•More Than 1 in 4 3Ls Without Offers •Placement Office Hires Public Interest Director •Let's Hope Search for New Dean is Not a Farce •Search Committee Seeks Student Input on Bollinger's Replacement •Want a Public Interest Job? Search Yourself •ACLU Pits Itself Against Student Freedom, Learning •3L Entrepreneur Provides Letter Service for Job Seekers •Crossword •A Dogfight with J.J. White •Third-Year Makes Use of Kamisar in Summer Job •Detroit Residents Receive Aid from Student Clinic •Nirvana: The Beatles of the '90s? •The Lewdicrous and Profane •The Docket •More Tips on Interviewing, Costume Hints •Alice in Chains: The ...


Vol. 44, No. 3, October 11, 1993, University Of Michigan Law School Oct 1993

Vol. 44, No. 3, October 11, 1993, University Of Michigan Law School

Res Gestae

•Survey: Some Claim Sex Harassment •Computer Lab Undergoes Improvements •Temper Hope for Mid-East Peace Process •The Bad, the Worse and the Ugly •Oktoberfest Raises Funds for Loan Forgiveness •New Curve will Help Most Only Slightly •Interview with a Defensive Prosecutor •The Docket •How to and Not to Interview for a Job •Law in the Raw


Vol. 44, No. 2, September 27, 1993, University Of Michigan Law School Sep 1993

Vol. 44, No. 2, September 27, 1993, University Of Michigan Law School

Res Gestae

•Student Seek Support for Boycott •First-Time Professors Join Law Faculty •Students Deserve to Have Exams Read •Lawyer-Bashing Reaches New Heights, Takes New Forms •Colorado Boycott Inappropriate for Law School •QLSA Asks for Support in Boycott of Colorado •Melon, Harvey Tell Musical Tales of Angst •Outside the Classroom: Lounging by the Pooley •The Docket •Fashion Hints for the Novice Law Student •Law in the Raw


The Deprofessionalization Of Legal Teaching And Scholarship, Richard A. Posner Aug 1993

The Deprofessionalization Of Legal Teaching And Scholarship, Richard A. Posner

Michigan Law Review

The editors have asked me to comment on Judge Edwards' double-barreled blast at legal education and the practice of law. This I am happy to do. It is an important article, stating with refreshing bluntness concerns that are widely felt but have never I think been so forcefully, so arrestingly expressed. Nevertheless I have deep disagreements with it.


Plus Ҫa Change, Paul Brest Aug 1993

Plus Ҫa Change, Paul Brest

Michigan Law Review

Harry Edwards and I both finished law school in 1965, and his article presents an occasion to consider how much the legal academy has changed during the intervening years. Animating Judge Edwards' complaints about the contemporary legal academy is a nostalgia for happier days. His images are of decline - of a growing disjunction between the academy and practice, of law schools' abandoning their proper missions, of their movement toward pure theory. My own view is quite different. Except for some noteworthy demographic transformations and a healthy broadening of the academic agenda, legal education has changed little during these almost thirty ...


Law Teachers' Writing, James Boyd White Aug 1993

Law Teachers' Writing, James Boyd White

Michigan Law Review

Judge Edwards divides scholarship into the theoretical and the practical, and, while conceding the place and value of both, argues that there is today too much of the former, too little of the latter. The result, he says, is an increasing and unfortunate divide between the life of law practice and the writing of law teachers. One can understand his complaint readily enough, especially coming as it does from an overworked judge. I myself have had perceptions and feelings somewhat like those that seem to animate Judge Edwards, though I would express them differently: for me the relevant line is ...


Mad Midwifery: Bringing Theory, Doctrine, And Practice To Life, Barbara Bennett Woodhouse Aug 1993

Mad Midwifery: Bringing Theory, Doctrine, And Practice To Life, Barbara Bennett Woodhouse

Michigan Law Review

I share Judge Edwards' concern about the health of legal education and about lawyers as a force in society. I differ, however, in defining the sickness and prescribing the cure, at least when it comes to teaching. In my view, we need to integrate, not to dichotomize and polarize further, the practical and the impractical, the doctrinal and the theoretical. His critique, and my intuitive response to it, challenged me to examine and articulate where we disagree, based on what I have learned in my five years in the classroom and what it is I hope to accomplish in my ...


Judge Edwards' Indictment Of "Impractical" Scholars: The Need For A Bill Of Particulars, Sanford Levinson Aug 1993

Judge Edwards' Indictment Of "Impractical" Scholars: The Need For A Bill Of Particulars, Sanford Levinson

Michigan Law Review

I can summarize my response as follows: Although Judge Edwards' article certainly seems to be leveling a heartfelt indictment, it lacks a sufficiently precise bill of particulars to know exactly whom he has accused of doing what. Nor does one know exactly what penalty Judge Edwards would exact from the miscreants. Unless he supplies such a bill, his indictment should be dismissed, though, presumably, without prejudice to its reinstatement should he wish to do the hard work of supplying evidence for the charges he set out.


Students As Teachers, Teachers As Learners, Derrick Bell, Erin Edmonds Aug 1993

Students As Teachers, Teachers As Learners, Derrick Bell, Erin Edmonds

Michigan Law Review

Judge Edwards divides his analysis of the cause of the crisis in ethical lawyering into an overview and three parts. The overview and first two parts deal mainly with the role of law schools and legal curriculum in what he views as the deterioration of responsible, capable practitioners. This article takes issue with some of the assumptions, analyses, and conclusions those sections contain. The third part of Edwards' article analyzes the role of law firms in causing that same deterioration. This article agrees with and will elaborate upon that part of Edwards' treatment.

We approach Judge Edwards' article, we hope ...


Clerks In The Maze, Pierre Schlag Aug 1993

Clerks In The Maze, Pierre Schlag

Michigan Law Review

It must be very difficult to be a judge - particularly an appellate judge. Not only must appellate judges reconcile often incommensurable visions of what law is, what it commands, or what it strives to achieve, but judges must do this largely alone. What little help they have in terms of actual human contact, apart from their clerks, typically takes the form of two or more advocates whose entire raison d'être is to persuade, coax, and manipulate the judge into reaching a predetermined outcome - one which often instantiates or exemplifies only the most tenuous positive connection to the rhetoric of ...


Lawyers, Scholars, And The "Middle Ground", Robert W. Gordon Aug 1993

Lawyers, Scholars, And The "Middle Ground", Robert W. Gordon

Michigan Law Review

The Judge seems to be arguing that both teachers and firm lawyers have been seduced from their real vocation by the fatal attraction of neighboring cultures: the practitioners by the commercial culture of their business clients, the academics by the disciplinary paradigms and prestige of theory in the rest of the university. The "deserted middle ground" is the ground of professional practice - practical, yet also public-minded. Perhaps without straining his thesis too far we could ascribe to Judge Edwards a "republican" view of the legal profession, in which legal scholars, practitioners, judges, legislators, and administrators - despite their separate interests and ...


The Disjunction Between Judge Edwards And Professor Priest, Louis H. Pollak Aug 1993

The Disjunction Between Judge Edwards And Professor Priest, Louis H. Pollak

Michigan Law Review

With characteristic vigor, Judge Harry Edwards, in his essay The Growing Disjunction Between Legal Education and the Legal Profession, has censured the law schools and, secondarily, the bar, for what he sees as profoundly disturbing trends pulling academics and practitioners farther and farther apart. Judge Edwards' censure is not proffered off the cuff. He has carefully polled his former law clerks on their perceptions of their law school years and of their postclerkship professional experiences - whether in private practice, in government, or in teaching. In the text and footnotes of his essay, Judge Edwards quotes his law clerks' responses in ...


Pro Bono Legal Work: For The Good Of Not Only The Public, But Also The Lawyer And The Legal Profession, Nadine Strossen Aug 1993

Pro Bono Legal Work: For The Good Of Not Only The Public, But Also The Lawyer And The Legal Profession, Nadine Strossen

Michigan Law Review

I agree with Judge Edwards that "the lawyer has an ethical obligation to practice public interest law - to represent some poor clients; to advance some causes that he or she believes to be just." I also concur in Judge Edwards' opinion that "[a] person who deploys his or her doctrinal skill without concern for the public interest is merely a good legal technician - not a good lawyer."

Rather than further develop Judge Edwards' theme that lawyers have a professional responsibility to do pro bono work, I will offer another rationale for such work, grounded in professional and individual self-interest. Specifically ...


The Mind In The Major American Law School, Lee C. Bollinger Aug 1993

The Mind In The Major American Law School, Lee C. Bollinger

Michigan Law Review

Legal scholarship is significantly, even qualitatively, different from what it was some two or three decades ago. As with any major change in intellectual thought, this one is composed of several strands. The inclusion in the legal academic community of women and minorities has produced, not surprisingly, a distinctive and at times quite critical body of thought and writing. The emergence of the school of thought known as critical legal studies has renewed and extended the legal realist critique of law of the first half of the century. But more than anything else it is the interdisciplinary movement in legal ...


The Growing Disjunction Between Legal Education And The Legal Profession: A Postscript, Harry T. Edwards Aug 1993

The Growing Disjunction Between Legal Education And The Legal Profession: A Postscript, Harry T. Edwards

Michigan Law Review

In this essay I offer a postscript to "The Growing Disjunction." It is not possible for me to "respond" directly to the other participants in this symposium, because I had no opportunity before publication to read what they have written. I will therefore limit myself to two tasks. First, I will briefly discuss several issues raised in the article. Second, and most important, I wish to share a representative sample of the responses I have received regarding the article. These responses, I think, provide good evidence of the magnitude of the problem that we face.


Stewardship, Donald B. Ayer Aug 1993

Stewardship, Donald B. Ayer

Michigan Law Review

While I agree with much that Judge Edwards has proposed, I thus submit that his formulations of the problem are partial - a bit like those of the blind men examining different parts of the elephant. The law's current unhappiness is only partly described as that of law schools and practicing lawyers going in different directions, of law practice becoming too commercial, or of law schools failing to serve the needs of the practicing lawyers and judges with practical teaching and scholarship. All of these observations, while correct as far as they go, miss the root of the problem, which ...


Commentary On Judge Edwards' "Growing Disjunction Between Legal Education And The Legal Profession", James L. Oakes Aug 1993

Commentary On Judge Edwards' "Growing Disjunction Between Legal Education And The Legal Profession", James L. Oakes

Michigan Law Review

Perhaps this little piece should be entitled Grace Notes rather than Commentary because I agree with so much of what Judge Edwards had to say in the Michigan Law Review. When I first read his piece, I have to say I was quite skeptical of his methodology, namely, running a survey past a group of former law clerks who, by virtue of their own super achievement, primarily in so-called elite law schools, quite easily could have ethereal points of view. But in typical Edwardsian fashion, the judge made appropriate disclaimers, and the clerks' comments seemed to me, for the most ...


Vol. 43, No. 11, April 19, 1993, University Of Michigan Law School Apr 1993

Vol. 43, No. 11, April 19, 1993, University Of Michigan Law School

Res Gestae

•Law School: American Dream or Indentured Servitude? •Brother Can You Spare a Grant or a Loan? •Admissions: The First Step Toward the Dream •Sustein: Porn is Not Free Speech •MacKinnon Responds to Letter Printed in "Princess" Column •Pre-Screening: A Panacea for Placement? •Increased Costs, Lower State Aid Result in Tuition Hikes •Students Face Leaner Job Market •Faculty Propose Changes in Grade System •Law School Seeks to Fill Faculty Spots •The Docket •LSSS Funds Stolen From Office •Some Royal Hints for Interviewing


Vol. 43, No. 10, April 5, 1993, University Of Michigan Law School Apr 1993

Vol. 43, No. 10, April 5, 1993, University Of Michigan Law School

Res Gestae

•Hungry for Justice, Hungry for Peace •Pro Bono Could Become More than an Option •Page: Tackle Inner City Educational Barriers •Could we Have Been More Diligent? •Gender Journal Responds to RG Article •Rodney King Verdict: Future Legal Repercussions? •Law Students Seek to Add Women to the Walls •Haitian Refugee Problem: A Real-Life Drama •Judge Promotes Equal Rights for Children •Shaw to Attend Conference in South Africa •New Section Grateful for Program •The Docket •In the Line of Fire: A Clerkship •Summer Starters Dominate Moot Court •And Now, a Word on Our Faculty •Law in the Raw


Vol. 43, No. 9, March 22, 1993, University Of Michigan Law School Mar 1993

Vol. 43, No. 9, March 22, 1993, University Of Michigan Law School

Res Gestae

•Harvard Leaks Vote on MacKinnon Offer •UM Settles Pornography Dispute •LSSS Elections: Youthful Experience Dominates •Legal World Rocked by Controversy •This Full House Should Have Been Flushed •New Externship Rule: Burr on Law School's Butt •Family Law Project Undergoes Changes •Fall Grades •The Docket •1993 SFF Auction Raises Needed Funds •The 'Royal Mail' has Arrived •Law in the Raw


Vol. 43, No. 8, March 8, 1993, University Of Michigan Law School Mar 1993

Vol. 43, No. 8, March 8, 1993, University Of Michigan Law School

Res Gestae

•Computer Lab's Future in Question •LSSS Presidential Hopefuls Both 1L's, Simpson's Fans •Transracial Adoption Discussed at Family Law Symposium •Has LSSS Compromised Integrity? •Students Compete in Jessup Regionals •Campbell Finalists are Chosen •Fund for Alumnus J.D. Sinnock to Award Scholarship for 2Ls •Gerken Wants to Leave Mark on Law Review •Law School Receives Funds to Establish Professorships •The Docket •LSSS Candidates State Their Views •Rock n' Roll Lawyer: A Seduction •Crossword •Students Need Dressing, Dipping Tips •Law in the Raw


Vol. 43, No. 7, February 8, 1993, University Of Michigan Law School Jan 1993

Vol. 43, No. 7, February 8, 1993, University Of Michigan Law School

Res Gestae

•Clinic Aids Custody Tug-of-War •Summer Funding Program Working to Overcome Deficit •Epstein Attacks Title VII Law •Students, Profs Must Not Wimp Out to PC •Profs Put Students in Sticky Situation •Are Lawyers Really Smarter Than Everyone Else? •Student Denounces Golden Editorial •Marshall: Giant, Fighter, Leader •Letter Criticizes Epstein's Theories on Race, Economics •1Ls Discuss Death Penalty •The Docket •Kung Fu Speaking: A Testimony •Entertainment Corner •St. Valentine's Day Survival Tips •Law in the Raw


Vol. 43, No. 6, January 25, 1993, University Of Michigan Law School Jan 1993

Vol. 43, No. 6, January 25, 1993, University Of Michigan Law School

Res Gestae

•1L Campus Interviews Increase •MLK Day Panel Puts Focus on Jury in Rodney King Case •3L May Face Charges in Lawyers' Club Incident •Executive Orders Not End for Pro-Choicers •Student Describes Police Abuses in Lawyers' Club •Lawyers Under Attack… Again? •How Should Yale Spend His Money? •The Docket •The Lawyer's Vacation: A Prediction •Practice Safe Sex: Keep Your Socks On •Crossword •Shaw Will Return to Legal Defense Fund on Two-Year Leave


Class Of 1993 Five Year Report Alumni Comments, University Of Michigan Law School Jan 1993

Class Of 1993 Five Year Report Alumni Comments, University Of Michigan Law School

UMLS Alumni Survey Class Reports

This addendum is a compilation of alumni responses to the open-ended comments sections.


Class Of 1993 Five Year Report, University Of Michigan Law School Jan 1993

Class Of 1993 Five Year Report, University Of Michigan Law School

UMLS Alumni Survey Class Reports

This report summarizes the findings of a questionnaire sent to University of Michigan Law School alumni five years after graduation.


Harry Edward's Nostalgia, Paul D. Reingold Jan 1993

Harry Edward's Nostalgia, Paul D. Reingold

Articles

Until fairly recently, the work of people who thought and wrote about the law in its broadest cultural sense, and the work of those who thought and wrote about the law as it was practiced, did not intersect very much. The broad cultural issues tended to be the province of philosophers or political theorists or other academic social critics, while traditional legal scholarship - as it appeared in law school journals - remained firmly rooted in lawyers' questions. This is not to suggest that legal academics wrote nothing but practice manuals, but it is true that until the last twenty years or ...


Letter To Judge Harry Edwards, James J. White Jan 1993

Letter To Judge Harry Edwards, James J. White

Articles

Dear Harry: I write to second your statements concerning the disjunction between legal education and the legal profession and also to quibble with you. By examining the faculty, the curriculum, and the research agenda at Michigan, your school and mine, I hope to illustrate the ways in which you are right and to suggest other ways in which you and your clerk informants may be too pessimistic.


Wayne R. Lafave: Search And Seizure Commentator At Work And Play, Yale Kamisar, Jerold H. Israel Jan 1993

Wayne R. Lafave: Search And Seizure Commentator At Work And Play, Yale Kamisar, Jerold H. Israel

Articles

Starting in 1969,1 we have had the honor and pleasure of co-authoring a goodly number of casebooks, texts, treatises, pocket parts, and annual supplements (more than twenty) with Wayne LaFave.2 On each occasion we have been impressed by the quality of his mind and the judiciousness of his temperament, and impressed as well (and sometimes amazed) by his speed and efficiency.