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Series

SSRN

Columbia Law School

2004

Tax Law

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Law

Balance In The Taxation Of Derivative Securities: An Agenda For Reform, David M. Schizer Jan 2004

Balance In The Taxation Of Derivative Securities: An Agenda For Reform, David M. Schizer

Faculty Scholarship

By now, it is well understood that aggressive tax planning among high-income individuals and corporations represents a grave threat to the U.S. tax system, and that derivatives are staples of this planning. In response, the usual recommendation is consistency, which means that the same tax treatment should apply to economically comparable bets, regardless of what form is used. Yet because consistency is unattainable, this Article develops an alternative theory: Policymakers should strive instead for balance. This means that for each risky position, the treatment of gains should match the treatment of losses. For example, if the government bears 15 ...


Contextual Analysis Of Tax Ownership, Alex Raskolnikov Jan 2004

Contextual Analysis Of Tax Ownership, Alex Raskolnikov

Faculty Scholarship

Ownership is one of the most fundamental concepts in tax law, yet it is remarkably confused. The uncertainty inhibits tax planning, leads to inconsistent responses from the government, and produces unexpected outcomes in the courts. There has been no shortage of scholarly attention to the issue, but most of the commentary has been either exceedingly narrow or focused on far-reaching reforms. As a result, the law of tax ownership lacks conceptual foundation. This Article attempts to remedy the deficiency. It proposes a comprehensive approach to tax ownership and demonstrates that the doctrine may (and should) be significantly clarified without a ...


Scrubbing The Wash Sale Rules, David M. Schizer Jan 2004

Scrubbing The Wash Sale Rules, David M. Schizer

Faculty Scholarship

Loss limitations are an ugly but inevitable feature of any realization-based income tax. In essence, because the system mismeasures gains, it also has to mismeasure losses. Otherwise, the timing option inherent in the realization rule would allow taxpayers to defer gains (thereby reducing the tax's present value) while accelerating losses (thereby preserving the deduction's present value).

The wash sale regime of Section 1091 is one of our system's most important brakes on the timing option. Yet it is only a slight exaggeration to say that compliance with the regime is voluntary for very wealthy taxpayers – or, at ...