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Full-Text Articles in Law

Vii. Legal Education In The Americas, A. An Introduction (Proceedings Of The Third Annual Legal & Policy Issues In The Americas Conference), Jon L. Mills Oct 2002

Vii. Legal Education In The Americas, A. An Introduction (Proceedings Of The Third Annual Legal & Policy Issues In The Americas Conference), Jon L. Mills

UF Law Faculty Publications

Proceedings of the Third Annual Legal & Policy Issues in the Americas Conference (2002)


Daughter Of Liberty Wedded To Law: Gender And Legal Education At The University Of Pennsylvania Department Of Law 1870-1900, Bridget J. Crawford Apr 2002

Daughter Of Liberty Wedded To Law: Gender And Legal Education At The University Of Pennsylvania Department Of Law 1870-1900, Bridget J. Crawford

Pace Law Faculty Publications

Using the University of Pennsylvania's Law Department and, to some extent, the figure of Carrie Burnham Kilgore as lenses, this article examines a thirty year period of major changes in legal education. In Part I, Prof. Crawford describes the historical roots of the school and its halting establishment in light of the predominant role individual lawyers played in training students through law office clerkships. Part II details several related changes in the legal profession in the 1870s: the law office declined in prominence; bar associations became more active; and law schools developed rigorous requirements. In particular, Prof. Crawford describes ...


The Contemplative Lawyer: On The Potential Contributions Of Mindfulness Meditation To Law Students, Lawyers, And Their Clients, Leonard L. Riskin Apr 2002

The Contemplative Lawyer: On The Potential Contributions Of Mindfulness Meditation To Law Students, Lawyers, And Their Clients, Leonard L. Riskin

UF Law Faculty Publications

This Article proposes that introducing mindfulness meditation into the legal profession may improve practitioners' well-being and performance and weaken the dominance of adversarial mind-sets. By enabling some lawyers to make more room for - and act from - broader and deeper perspectives, mindfulness can help lawyers provide more appropriate service (especially through better listening and negotiation) and gain more personal satisfaction from their work.

Part I of this article describes a number of problems associated with law school and law practice. Part II sets forth a variety of ways in which lawyers, law schools, and professional organizations have tried to address these ...


Remembering Harry Bitner: Law Librarian, Professor, And Wonderful Colleague, Claire M. Germain Apr 2002

Remembering Harry Bitner: Law Librarian, Professor, And Wonderful Colleague, Claire M. Germain

UF Law Faculty Publications

Professor Harry Bitner was an outstanding law librarian who shaped many of our best libraries, who was a mentor to many younger law librarians, and who provided leadership to the law library profession and to legal education generally.


The Social Responsibility Of Corporate Law Professors, Lyman P.Q. Johnson Jan 2002

The Social Responsibility Of Corporate Law Professors, Lyman P.Q. Johnson

Faculty Scholarship

Most statements of corporate social responsibility focus on the responsibilities of corporate decision makers or their advisors Professor Johnson argues that corporate law professors-the persons who educate the students who will become lawyers counseling corporate decision makers-also have a social responsibility. He believes that professors should find various ways to raise the subject of corporate social responsibility in the basic corporations course, and he advocates rejecting a classroom approach that addresses only shareholder-manager relations After describing several possible ways to do this, Professor Johnson spotlights fiduciary laws as a fruitful area to enrich student understandings of director duties in a ...


Observations On The Evolution Of Minorities In The Law: From Law School To Practice, Charles E. Cantú Jan 2002

Observations On The Evolution Of Minorities In The Law: From Law School To Practice, Charles E. Cantú

Faculty Articles

The St. Mary’s University School of Law has a rich history in promoting the representation of minorities in its faculty and student body. Moreover, its history in this area was a tradition long before the country found its social conscience, and before the American government, prodded by the civil rights movement, urged institutions of higher learning to engage in affirmative action. St. Mary’s and Hispanics led the way in this national movement. This year, as St. Mary’s University School of Law celebrates its seventy-fifth year, it is a perfect time to reflect upon the evolution of minorities ...


One View To Add To The Many, Bill Piatt Jan 2002

One View To Add To The Many, Bill Piatt

Faculty Articles

The United States offers its citizens the opportunity to participate in the legal and political system through which it governs. The Constitution ensures that its citizens may engage, participate, and represent the body politics in government and the application of its laws. The recent attacks on America and the failure of the immigration system in monitoring its applicants has resulted in more restrictive immigration laws and policy.

The country’s legal education system must continue to improve its efforts in diversifying the nation’s law schools. More minorities should be represented as students, professors, and deans. Accomplishing a more diversified ...


The Unplanned Obsolescence Of American Legal Education, Rena I. Steinzor, Alan D. Hornstein Jan 2002

The Unplanned Obsolescence Of American Legal Education, Rena I. Steinzor, Alan D. Hornstein

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Coalescing With Salt: A Taste For Inclusion, Phoebe A. Haddon Jan 2002

Coalescing With Salt: A Taste For Inclusion, Phoebe A. Haddon

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Joining Forces: The Role Of Collaboration In The Development Of Legal Thought, Tracey E. George, Chris Guthrie Jan 2002

Joining Forces: The Role Of Collaboration In The Development Of Legal Thought, Tracey E. George, Chris Guthrie

Vanderbilt Law School Faculty Publications

For every reason to believe that collaboration has been influential... there is a countervailing reason to believe that it has played a minor role in the evolution of legal thought. It may be easy to bring to mind a handful of prominent collaborations, but most law review articles seem to be written by one author (notwithstanding their lengthy acknowledgment footnotes, suggesting that even single-author works are shaped by the insights and input of multiple scholars). And while it is true that legal scholars often collaborate on their practically oriented works, scholarly articles might not be well suited to collaboration.


Teacher, Coach, Cheerleader, And Judge: Promoting Learning Through Learner-Centered Assessment, Kristin B. Gerdy Jan 2002

Teacher, Coach, Cheerleader, And Judge: Promoting Learning Through Learner-Centered Assessment, Kristin B. Gerdy

Faculty Scholarship

The author explores the importance of learner-centered assessment and feedback in legal research instruction, and encourages legal research teachers to assist their students' quest to acquire practical legal research abilities by transitioning into the roles of coach, cheerleader, and judge.


Environmental Law In The Political Ecosystem - Coping With The Reality Of Politics, Zygmunt J.B. Plater Jan 2002

Environmental Law In The Political Ecosystem - Coping With The Reality Of Politics, Zygmunt J.B. Plater

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

In this Essay, the proposition the author draws from the narrative of the endangered species litigation is derivatively Aristotelian – that we must consciously, actively, and explicitly integrate an informed consideration of human politics into what we teach and do in environmental law. The proposition is not that we should steep ourselves in party politics, although there are interesting observations aplenty that could be made on the direct consequences that the two major parties (and occassionally their wistful smaller incarnations) have on the evolution of environmental law. The proposition offered here operates at two different levels: practical politics and political overview ...


What We Share, Thomas D. Eisele Jan 2002

What We Share, Thomas D. Eisele

Faculty Articles and Other Publications

Anyone involved in legal education today may wonder where we are, and what we are doing, in our task of teaching. While I am no better placed than anyone else to be able to offer anything approaching a synoptic view of legal education, I can still offer a few thoughts on teaching law. These thoughts are meant neither as a dire warning nor as a call to action. They are published, rather, out of a desire to share some ideas I have culled from the experience of teaching these past twenty years in law school. Teachers and students who find ...


Introduction To Erasing Lines: Integrating The Law School Curriculum, Amy E. Sloan Jan 2002

Introduction To Erasing Lines: Integrating The Law School Curriculum, Amy E. Sloan

All Faculty Scholarship

Our goal at this conference is to begin the process of erasing the often artificial lines that presently exist between "doctrinal" and "skills" courses, between education focused on the acquisition of knowledge and education focused on the practical application of that knowledge. The lines that have been drawn are more a matter of perception than reality. If we were to deconstruct the pedagogical goals in both of these types of courses, we would find that they have as many similarities as they have differences.


From Punch Cards To Smart Cards: A History Of The Technology At The Levin College Of Law, Betty W. Taylor Jan 2002

From Punch Cards To Smart Cards: A History Of The Technology At The Levin College Of Law, Betty W. Taylor

UF Law Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


The Case Of The Foreign Lawyer: Internationalizing The U.S. Legal Profession, Carole Silver Jan 2002

The Case Of The Foreign Lawyer: Internationalizing The U.S. Legal Profession, Carole Silver

Articles by Maurer Faculty

This article contributes a new perspective to existing scholarship on internationalization of the legal profession by focusing on the increasing presence of foreign lawyers in U.S. law schools and law firms. It analyzes the interaction between foreign-educated lawyers and the legal profession in the U.S. based upon two sources of information: first, a series of interviews with foreign-educated lawyers and U.S. law firm hiring partners regarding experiences in law school and in firms, and second, a database comprised of biographical information for more than 300 foreign-educated lawyers who were working in New York during 1999 and 2000 ...


Introduction: Favorite Insurance Cases Symposium, Jeffrey W. Stempel Jan 2002

Introduction: Favorite Insurance Cases Symposium, Jeffrey W. Stempel

Scholarly Works

Insurance law scholars and teachers sometimes feel, with a mixture of paranoia and justification, that insurance law simply does not receive its proper respect in the hierarchy of legal education and law generally.

Consider the law school curriculum. In none of America’s nearly 200 ABA-approved law schools in insurance law a required course. Nor is it considered a course that, although not required, prudent students “must” be sure to take before they graduate (e.g. Evidence, Corporations). Enrollments may be respectable but the class is seldom oversubscribed, even where the law school is located in an insurance hub city ...


Do Best Practices In Legal Education Include Emphasis On Compositional Modes Of Studying Law As A Liberal Art?, Linda L. Berger Jan 2002

Do Best Practices In Legal Education Include Emphasis On Compositional Modes Of Studying Law As A Liberal Art?, Linda L. Berger

Scholarly Works

Reporter's Notes on "A Liberal Education in Law: Engaging the Legal Imagination through Research and Writing Beyond the Curriculum."


Is "Thinking Like A Lawyer" Really What We Want To Teach?, Nancy B. Rapoport Jan 2002

Is "Thinking Like A Lawyer" Really What We Want To Teach?, Nancy B. Rapoport

Scholarly Works

This article argues that the phrase thinking like a lawyer assumes that other professions don't have their own ways of approaching problems and that law schools only need to teach how lawyers think, rather than how lawyers do what they do. It suggests that law schools should do much more than just teach law students how to think.