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Full-Text Articles in Law

Legal Research Instruction And Law Librarianship In China: An Updated View Of Current Practices And A Comparison With The U.S. Legal Education System, Ning Han, Liying Yu, Anne Mostad-Jensen Jan 2017

Legal Research Instruction And Law Librarianship In China: An Updated View Of Current Practices And A Comparison With The U.S. Legal Education System, Ning Han, Liying Yu, Anne Mostad-Jensen

Faculty Scholarship

This article follows up on Liying Yu’s 2008 survey exploring the state of legal research instruction in Chinese law schools. The updated survey revisits the state of legal research instruction in China, explores several aspects not previously addressed, and discusses broader issues relevant to law librarianship in China such as management models, funding, staffing, and law librarian faculty status.


A Community Of Procedure Scholars: Teaching Procedure And The Legal Academy, Elizabeth G. Thornburg, Erik S. Knutsen, Carla Crifo, Camille Cameron Jan 2013

A Community Of Procedure Scholars: Teaching Procedure And The Legal Academy, Elizabeth G. Thornburg, Erik S. Knutsen, Carla Crifo, Camille Cameron

Faculty Scholarship

This article asks whether the way in which procedure is taught has an impact on the extent and accomplishments of a scholarly community of proceduralists. Not surprisingly, we find a strong correlation between the placement of procedure as a required course in an academic context and the resulting body of scholars and scholarship. Those countries in which more civil procedure is taught as part of a university degree — and in which procedure is recognized as a legitimate academic subject — have larger scholarly communities, a larger and broader corpus of works analyzing procedural issues, and a richer web of institutional support ...


Agenda: A Life Of Contributions For All Time: Symposium In Honor Of David H. Getches, University Of Colorado Boulder. School Of Law, University Of Colorado Law Review Apr 2012

Agenda: A Life Of Contributions For All Time: Symposium In Honor Of David H. Getches, University Of Colorado Boulder. School Of Law, University Of Colorado Law Review

A Life of Contributions for All Time: Symposium in Honor of David H. Getches (April 26-27)

On April 26-27, 2012, Colorado Law honored David H. Getches with a symposium to celebrate his life and legacy of trailblazing scholarship. “A Life of Contributions for All Time” featured a keynote address by Distinguished Professor Charles Wilkinson entitled, “Hero for the People, Hero for the Land and Water: Reflections on the Enduring Contributions of David Getches.” Top scholars in the fields of natural resources, water, and American Indian law reflected on Dean Getches’ contributions and their own insights into these fields, including Professor John Leshy, John Echohawk, Professor Carole Goldberg, Professor Joe Sax, Professor Rebecca Tsosie, Justice Greg Hobbs ...


Transsystemia – Are We Approaching A New Langdellian Moment? Is Mcgill Leading The Way?, Peter L. Strauss Jan 2006

Transsystemia – Are We Approaching A New Langdellian Moment? Is Mcgill Leading The Way?, Peter L. Strauss

Faculty Scholarship

Late in the 19th century, as our economy was transformed into a truly national one, legal education was transformed by the adoption of a teaching technique – Langdell's Socratic Method – that succeeded in creating law graduates confident of their capacity to be professionals in ANY American common law jurisdiction – national lawyers even in the absence of a national common law. Today, as the economy is once again transforming, now internationally, lawyers have an equivalent need to be confident of their capacity to perform across national boundaries. The paper briefly describes the way in which McGill University's Faculty of Law ...


Professor Kingsfield Goes To Delhi: American Academics, The Ford Foundation, And The Development Of Legal Education In India, Jayanth K. Krishnan Jan 2004

Professor Kingsfield Goes To Delhi: American Academics, The Ford Foundation, And The Development Of Legal Education In India, Jayanth K. Krishnan

Articles by Maurer Faculty

No abstract provided.


Comparative And International Health Law, Timothy Stoltzfus Jost Jan 2003

Comparative And International Health Law, Timothy Stoltzfus Jost

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


The Professional In Legal Education: Foreign Perspectives, James Maxeiner Jan 2003

The Professional In Legal Education: Foreign Perspectives, James Maxeiner

All Faculty Scholarship

Japan is about to change its system of legal education. In April 2004 Japan will introduce law schools. Law schools are to occupy an intermediary place between the present undergraduate faculties of law and the national Legal Training and Research Institute. The law faculties are to continue to offer general undergraduate education in law, while the law schools in combination with the national Institute are to provide professional legal education. A principal goal of the change is to produce more lawyers. Law schools are charged with providing "practical education especially for fostering legal professionals." But just what is professional legal ...


American Law Schools As A Model For Japanese Legal Education? A Preliminary Question From A Comparative Perspective, James Maxeiner Jan 2003

American Law Schools As A Model For Japanese Legal Education? A Preliminary Question From A Comparative Perspective, James Maxeiner

All Faculty Scholarship

Law faculties in Japan are asking whether and how they should remake themselves to become law schools. One basic issue has been framed in terms of whether such programs should be professional or general. One Japanese scholar put it pointedly: "[a] major issue of the proposed reform is whether Japan should adopt an American model law school, i.e., professional education at the graduate level, while essentially doing away with the traditional Japanese method of teaching law at university." American law schools are seen as having as their fundamental goal "to provide the training and education required for becoming an ...


Why Are U.S. Lawyers Not Learning From Comparative Law?, Ernst C. Stiefel, James Maxeiner Jan 1997

Why Are U.S. Lawyers Not Learning From Comparative Law?, Ernst C. Stiefel, James Maxeiner

All Faculty Scholarship

Address the problem of comparative law in the United States. Explains why comparative law matters. Gives reasons why U.S. lawyers are not learning from comparative law. These include lack of skills, lack of institutional supports, and legal structures that resist comparative law and an attitude that comparative law has little to teach.


A Holistic Approach To Criminal Justice Scholarship, William T. Pizzi Jan 1995

A Holistic Approach To Criminal Justice Scholarship, William T. Pizzi

Articles

No abstract provided.


China’S Environmental Legislation And Current Issues, Dian Rong Luo Aug 1987

China’S Environmental Legislation And Current Issues, Dian Rong Luo

Proceedings of the Sino-American Conference on Environmental Law (August 16)

8 pages.


Comments. Roundtable On Taxation, Association Of American Law Schools, 1968 Conference, William D. Popkin Jan 1970

Comments. Roundtable On Taxation, Association Of American Law Schools, 1968 Conference, William D. Popkin

Articles by Maurer Faculty

No abstract provided.


Roundtable On Administrative Law: Proceedings, William Burnett Harvey Jan 1970

Roundtable On Administrative Law: Proceedings, William Burnett Harvey

Articles by Maurer Faculty

No abstract provided.


Book Review. Comparative Law: Cases, Text, Materials By R. B. Schlesinger, Wencelas J. Wagner Jan 1960

Book Review. Comparative Law: Cases, Text, Materials By R. B. Schlesinger, Wencelas J. Wagner

Articles by Maurer Faculty

No abstract provided.


A Law Teacher's Tour Around The World, Jerome Hall Jan 1958

A Law Teacher's Tour Around The World, Jerome Hall

Articles by Maurer Faculty

No abstract provided.