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Articles 1 - 18 of 18

Full-Text Articles in Law

Baker V. State And The Promise Of The New Judicial Federalism, Charles H. Baron, Lawrence Friedman Dec 2001

Baker V. State And The Promise Of The New Judicial Federalism, Charles H. Baron, Lawrence Friedman

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

In Baker v. State, the Supreme Court of Vermont ruled that the state constitution’s Common Benefits Clause prohibits the exclusion of same-sex couples from the benefits and protections of marriage. Baker has been praised by constitutional scholars as a prototypical example of the New Judicial Federalism. The authors agree, asserting that the decision sets a standard for constitutional discourse by dint of the manner in which each of the opinions connects and responds to the others, pulls together arguments from other state and federal constitutional authorities, and provides a clear basis for subsequent development of constitutional principle. This Article ...


A Truism That Isn't True? The Tenth Amendment And Executive War Power, D. A. Jeremy Telman Oct 2001

A Truism That Isn't True? The Tenth Amendment And Executive War Power, D. A. Jeremy Telman

Law Faculty Publications

The Tenth Amendment is invoked whenever congressional powers threaten the independent law-making power of the several states. In that context, however, the Tenth Amendment does not tell us very much. After all, if powers are not delegated to the federal government, where else would they go but to the states? Accordingly, the Supreme Court has dismissed the Amendment as a truism.

Although the Amendment is only deployed as a rather ineffectual check on congressional authority, it clearly applies to all branches of the federal government. However, according to the theory of inherent executive authority, certain powers are unique to the ...


Corrective Justice And Constitutional Torts, Bernard P. Dauenhauer, Michael L. Wells Apr 2001

Corrective Justice And Constitutional Torts, Bernard P. Dauenhauer, Michael L. Wells

Scholarly Works

Tort liability in the private realm may be understood as "an instrument aimed...at deterrence...[and] a way of achieving corrective justice between the parties." Following the common law model, the Supreme Court has borrowed this normative framework for constitutional torts, ruling that the aims of liability for damages are to vindicate constitutional rights and to deter constitutional violations. A recent article by Daryl Levinson takes issue with this approach. Levinson argues that the superficial similarities between public torts and private torts conceal real differences, to which neither the Court nor scholars have paid adequate attention. The main point of ...


Foreword: Symposium Re-Examining First Principles: Deterrence And Corrective Justice In Constitutional Torts, Thomas A. Eaton Apr 2001

Foreword: Symposium Re-Examining First Principles: Deterrence And Corrective Justice In Constitutional Torts, Thomas A. Eaton

Scholarly Works

This Symposium provides a forum for a careful and thoughtful consideration of whether constitutional tort law can deter wrongdoing and is consistent with principles of corrective justice.


Section 1983, The First Amendment, And Public Employee Speech: Shaping The Right To Fit The Remedy (And Vice Versa), Michael Wells Apr 2001

Section 1983, The First Amendment, And Public Employee Speech: Shaping The Right To Fit The Remedy (And Vice Versa), Michael Wells

Scholarly Works

This Article is not about theories of free speech and how they bear on the public employment context, nor does it contribute to the academic debate over what the aims of public employee speech law ought to be. I take the Court at its word when it says that its aim is to give substantial weight to both the value of speech and the government's interest as an employer. Unlike Massaro and Ingber, I take it as a given that the government may insist on hierarchy and obedience to authority in the workplace. Unlike Rosenthal, I begin from the ...


The Gfp (Green) Bunny: Reflections On The Intersection Of Art, Science And The First Amendment, Sheldon Nahmod Feb 2001

The Gfp (Green) Bunny: Reflections On The Intersection Of Art, Science And The First Amendment, Sheldon Nahmod

All Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Technologies Of Protest: Insurgent Social Movements And The First Amendment In The Era Of The Internet, Seth F. Kreimer Jan 2001

Technologies Of Protest: Insurgent Social Movements And The First Amendment In The Era Of The Internet, Seth F. Kreimer

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


Takings Clause, Tara Leigh Grove Jan 2001

Takings Clause, Tara Leigh Grove

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


The South Won't Rise Again But It's Time To Study The Defunct Confederacy's Constitution, Ralph Michael Stein Jan 2001

The South Won't Rise Again But It's Time To Study The Defunct Confederacy's Constitution, Ralph Michael Stein

Pace Law Faculty Publications

The premise of this essay is not to espouse that the Southern ideological and constitutional theorists were correct. I propose, however, that an understanding of the historical basis of constitutional law, and a recognition of evolving doctrinal issues of Federalism, will enhance law school curriculum. Presentation of these topics dictates the introduction of the Confederate Constitution into the curriculum of required courses and electives. This effort, I propose, would be a prudent step, to be amply repaid in terms of higher understanding and scholarly benefit.


The 2000-2001 Supreme Court Term: Section 1983 Cases, Martin A. Schwartz Jan 2001

The 2000-2001 Supreme Court Term: Section 1983 Cases, Martin A. Schwartz

Scholarly Works

No abstract provided.


Lochner, Liquor, And Longshoremen: A Puzzle In Progressive Era Federalism, Barry Cushman Jan 2001

Lochner, Liquor, And Longshoremen: A Puzzle In Progressive Era Federalism, Barry Cushman

Journal Articles

In 1890, the Supreme Court shocked and thrilled the civilized world with the announcement that dry states could not prohibit the sale of liquor shipped in from outside the state. So long as the out-of-state goods remained in their "original packages," the Court held they retained their character as interstate commerce subject only to federal regulation. The consequences for the cause of local sobriety were, predictably, catastrophic. The proliferation in temperance territory of "original package saloons," at which one could purchase liquor free from the superintendence of local liquor authorities, was appalling to dry eyes. Members of Congress immediately proposed ...


Federal Preemption Of State Tort Claims, Marin Roger Scordato Jan 2001

Federal Preemption Of State Tort Claims, Marin Roger Scordato

Scholarly Articles and Other Contributions

This article explores a continuing disagreement among Justices of the United States Supreme Court regarding the proper doctrinal framework for federal preemption jurisprudence. This important difference in views became apparent in the four federal preemption cases that the Supreme Court decided during its 1999-2000 term. The article describes this critical disagreement among the Justices, places it in the larger context of preemption doctrine, and then carefully analyzes a number of possible resolutions.

Federal preemption is an area of enormous practical and theoretical importance. It is a subject that has earned a regular place on the Supreme Court's docket for ...


Apologies Or Apologisits? Remembering The Japanese American Internment In Wyoming, Eric L. Muller Jan 2001

Apologies Or Apologisits? Remembering The Japanese American Internment In Wyoming, Eric L. Muller

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


The Supreme Court, Bush V. Gore, And Rough Justice, William P. Marshall Jan 2001

The Supreme Court, Bush V. Gore, And Rough Justice, William P. Marshall

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


The Supreme Court 2000 Term--Leading Cases, Good News Club V. Milford Central School, 121 S. Ct. 2093 (2001), Emily Gold Waldman Jan 2001

The Supreme Court 2000 Term--Leading Cases, Good News Club V. Milford Central School, 121 S. Ct. 2093 (2001), Emily Gold Waldman

Pace Law Faculty Publications

After the Supreme Court held in Widmar v. Vincent that state universities could not constitutionally deny religious groups access to facilities generally available to student groups, a number of school districts authored access policies that were designed to create “limited public forums.” These policies delineated the categories of activities for which school property could be used, and indicated that religious activities were not among them. In Lamb's Chapel v. Center Moriches Union Free School District, however, the Supreme Court struck a blow to the notion that school districts could employ the limited public forum approach to exclude religious activities ...


The Correction Of Wrongful Convictions: A Comparative Perspective, Lissa Griffin Jan 2001

The Correction Of Wrongful Convictions: A Comparative Perspective, Lissa Griffin

Pace Law Faculty Publications

This Article analyzes the different modes in which two facially similar adversarial systems remedy wrongful convictions. Part I briefly examines the origins of wrongful convictions in both England and the United States. Part II describes the appellate processes in the two countries for correcting wrongful convictions. Part III addresses the processes for correcting wrongful convictions after the appellate processes have been completed. Part IV critiques the English process and examines whether aspects of that process may be carried over to the United States.


What's So Special About American Law?, William Ewald Jan 2001

What's So Special About American Law?, William Ewald

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


United States Supreme Court: 2001 Term, Paul C. Giannelli Jan 2001

United States Supreme Court: 2001 Term, Paul C. Giannelli

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.