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Full-Text Articles in Law

Indian Nations And The Federal Government: What Will Justice Require In The Future? Claims Against The Sovereign 20th Jusicial Conference Of The United States Court Of Federal Claims, Charles Wilkinson Jan 2008

Indian Nations And The Federal Government: What Will Justice Require In The Future? Claims Against The Sovereign 20th Jusicial Conference Of The United States Court Of Federal Claims, Charles Wilkinson

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No abstract provided.


The Value Of Year Books Of International Law, James C. Hathaway Jan 2008

The Value Of Year Books Of International Law, James C. Hathaway

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Is there still a place for a 'Yearbook' of International Law? Viewed as no more than an annually published volume of scholarship, one would surely answer in the negative. There is no shortage of excellent law journals, including journals focused on international and comparative law. It is thus doubtful that any quality article published in a yearbook would have failed to find a good home elsewhere. With even relatively obscure law journals readily available in electronic form at minimal cost and with maximum ease, the case for a yearbook is surely weak if predicated simply on the importance of disseminating ...


The Human Rights Quagmire Of 'Human Trafficking', James C. Hathaway Jan 2008

The Human Rights Quagmire Of 'Human Trafficking', James C. Hathaway

Articles

Support for the international fight against "human trafficking" evolved quickly and comprehensively. The campaign launched by the UN General Assembly in December 19981 led to adoption just two years later of the Trafficking Protocol to the UN Convention against Organized Crime.2 U.S. President George W. Bush was among those particularly committed to the cause, calling for collective effort to eradicate the "special evil" of human trafficking, said by him to have become a "humanitarian crisis."3 One hundred and twenty-two countries have now ratified the Trafficking Protocol, agreeing in particular to criminalize trafficking and to cooperate in investigating ...