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Never Construed To Their Prejudice: In Honor Of David Getches, Richard B. Collins Jan 2013

Never Construed To Their Prejudice: In Honor Of David Getches, Richard B. Collins

Articles

This article reviews and analyzes the judicial canons of construction for Native American treaties and statutes. It discusses their theoretical justifications and practical applications. It concludes that the treaty canon has ready support in contract law and the law of treaty interpretation. Justification of the statutory canon is more challenging and could be strengthened by attention to the democratic deficit when Congress imposes laws on Indian country. Applications of the canons have mattered in disputes between Indian nations and private or state interests. They have made much less difference, and have suffered major failings, in disputes with the federal government ...


Indian Nations And The Federal Government: What Will Justice Require In The Future? Claims Against The Sovereign 20th Jusicial Conference Of The United States Court Of Federal Claims, Charles Wilkinson Jan 2008

Indian Nations And The Federal Government: What Will Justice Require In The Future? Claims Against The Sovereign 20th Jusicial Conference Of The United States Court Of Federal Claims, Charles Wilkinson

Articles

No abstract provided.


The Salmon People, Judge Boldt, And The Rule Of Law, Charles F. Wilkinson Jan 2006

The Salmon People, Judge Boldt, And The Rule Of Law, Charles F. Wilkinson

Articles

No abstract provided.


Nineteenth-Century Orthodoxy, Richard B. Collins Jan 1999

Nineteenth-Century Orthodoxy, Richard B. Collins

Articles

No abstract provided.


Conquering The Cultural Frontier: The New Subjectivism Of The Supreme Court In Indian Law, David H. Getches Jan 1996

Conquering The Cultural Frontier: The New Subjectivism Of The Supreme Court In Indian Law, David H. Getches

Articles

For a century and a half, the Supreme Court was faithful to a set of foundation principles respecting Indian tribal sovereignty. Though the United States can abrogate tribal powers and rights, it can only do so by legislation. Accordingly, the Court has protected reservations as enclaves for Indian self-government, preventing states from enforcing their laws and taxes, and holding that even federal laws could not be applied to Indians without congressional permission. Recently, however, the Court has assumed the job it formerly conceded to Congress, considering and weighing cases to reach results comporting with the Justices' subjective notions of what ...


Indian Consent To American Government, Richard B. Collins Jan 1989

Indian Consent To American Government, Richard B. Collins

Articles

No abstract provided.