Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Law Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 11 of 11

Full-Text Articles in Law

The Aftermath Of Stanford V. Roche: Which Law Of Assignments Governs?, Sean M. O'Connor Jan 2011

The Aftermath Of Stanford V. Roche: Which Law Of Assignments Governs?, Sean M. O'Connor

Articles

The discovery and commercialization of biotechnology innovations often rely on collaborations between universities and for-profit firms. In the United States, the federal government funds much of university life sciences research and, under the Bayh-Dole Act, has some rights to research arising from that funding.

Two important strands of invention ownership issues in this web of collaboration arose under litigation that culminated in the recent United States Supreme Court decision Board of Trustees of Leland Stanford Junior University v. Roche Molecular Systems, Inc. (“Stanford v. Roche” or “Stanford”). The first is the question of whether Bayh-Dole trumps any other invention assignment ...


A Special Rule For Compound Protection For Dna-Sequences Impact Of The Ecj "Monsanto" Decision On Patent Practice, Jan B. Krauss, Toshiko Takenaka Jan 2011

A Special Rule For Compound Protection For Dna-Sequences Impact Of The Ecj "Monsanto" Decision On Patent Practice, Jan B. Krauss, Toshiko Takenaka

Articles

This article will analyze the Monsanto decision, and criticize the European Court of Justice's interpretation of Article 9 as being incomplete, in particular for failing to take account of all articles and recitals in the Biotech Directive relating to the scope of protection. It will argue that applying the concept of a function-limited protection is unnecessary if a claim directed to an isolated DNA sequence is properly interpreted. It will also discuss the possible impact not only on the protection scope but also on the patentability of gene patents.


Intellectual Property, Innovation, And The Future: Toward A Better Model For Educating Leaders In Intellectual Property Law, Robert W. Gomulkiewicz Jan 2011

Intellectual Property, Innovation, And The Future: Toward A Better Model For Educating Leaders In Intellectual Property Law, Robert W. Gomulkiewicz

Articles

Intellectual property (IP) sits at the center of the global economy. Today, producers and users of intellectual property come from both developed and developing nations. Intellectual property matters as much to China and India as it does to Germany and the United States. This reality has driven a monumental demand for lawyers who have expertise in intellectual property law. These lawyers are the new leaders in intellectual property law.

The global demand for intellectual property law-trained lawyers triggered a "big bang" in the creation of advanced intellectual property law programs (IP Programs) at American law schools. The new leaders in ...


Efficient Uncertainty In Patent Interpretation, Harry Surden Jan 2011

Efficient Uncertainty In Patent Interpretation, Harry Surden

Articles

Research suggests that widespread uncertainty over the scopes of issued patents creates significant costs for third-party firms and may decrease innovation. This Article addresses the scope uncertainty issue from a theoretical perspective by creating a model of patent claim scope uncertainty.

It is often difficult for third parties to determine the legal coverage of issued patents. Scope underdetermination exists when the words of a patent claim are capable of a broad range of plausible scopes ex ante in light of the procedures for interpreting patents. Underdetermination creates uncertainty about claim coverage because a lay interpreter cannot know which interpretation will ...


Holden Caulfield Grows Up: Salinger V. Colting, The Promotion-Of-Progress Requirement, And Market Failure In A Derivative-Works Regime, John M. Newman Jan 2011

Holden Caulfield Grows Up: Salinger V. Colting, The Promotion-Of-Progress Requirement, And Market Failure In A Derivative-Works Regime, John M. Newman

Articles

In 2009, the pseudonymous 'John David California" announced plans for U.S. publication of 6o Years Later: Coming Through the Rye, a "sequel" to JD. Salinger's canonical novel The Catcher in the Rye. Salinger reacted swiftly, bringing a copyright infingement suit to enjoin publication of the new work. The district court granted the injunction, effectively banning U.S. distribution of the sequel and unintentionally illustrating modern copyright law's troubling divergence from the purpose of the constitutional grant of copyright authority to Congress.

Economic analysis demonstrates the tension caused by the repeated, incremental expansion of copyright protections-at some point ...


Overcoming Babel’S Curse: Adapting The Doctrine Of Foreign Equivalents, Jonathan Skinner Jan 2011

Overcoming Babel’S Curse: Adapting The Doctrine Of Foreign Equivalents, Jonathan Skinner

Articles

No abstract provided.


Raising The Bar And The Public Interest: On Prior Restraints, Traditional Contours, And Constitutionalizing Preliminary Injunctions In Copyright Law, John M. Newman Jan 2011

Raising The Bar And The Public Interest: On Prior Restraints, Traditional Contours, And Constitutionalizing Preliminary Injunctions In Copyright Law, John M. Newman

Articles

No abstract provided.


Readers' Copyright, Jessica D. Litman Jan 2011

Readers' Copyright, Jessica D. Litman

Articles

My goal in this project is to reclaim copyright for readers (and listeners, viewers, and other members of the audience). I think, and will try to persuade you, that the gradual and relatively recent disappearance of readers’ interests from the core of copyright’s perceived goals has unbalanced the copyright system. It may have prompted, at least in part, the scholarly critique of copyright that has fueled copyright lawyers’ impression that “so many in academia side with the pirates.” It may also be responsible for much of the deterioration in public support for copyright. I argue here that copyright seems ...


Patent Costs And Unlicensed Use Of Patented Inventions, Rebecca S. Eisenberg Jan 2011

Patent Costs And Unlicensed Use Of Patented Inventions, Rebecca S. Eisenberg

Articles

Recent commentators have observed, and sometimes lamented, significant gaps between the formal reach of the patent system and the practical exclusionary effect of patent law. It is costly for technology developers to obtain and assert patents, for technology users to identify the patents they might be infringing and to clear rights, and for the Patent and Trademark Office (PTO) to find patent-defeating prior art. The costs of the patent system provide shelter for infringing behavior that might otherwise lead to either licensing or liability, perhaps mitigating excesses in the patent system while retaining strong rights that motivated owners may enforce ...


Beyond Invention: Patent As Knowledge Law, Michael J. Madison Jan 2011

Beyond Invention: Patent As Knowledge Law, Michael J. Madison

Articles

The decision of the Supreme Court of the United States in Bilski v. Kappos, concerning the legal standard for determining patentable subject matter under the American Patent Act, is used as a starting point for a brief review of historical, philosophical, and cultural influences on subject matter questions in both patent and copyright law. The article suggests that patent and copyright law jurisprudence was constructed initially by the Court with explicit attention to the relationship between these forms of intellectual property law and the roles of knowledge in society. Over time, explicit attention to that relationship has largely disappeared from ...


Knowledge Curation, Michael J. Madison Jan 2011

Knowledge Curation, Michael J. Madison

Articles

This Article addresses conservation, preservation, and stewardship of knowledge, and laws and institutions in the cultural environment that support those things. Legal and policy questions concerning creativity and innovation usually focus on producing new knowledge and offering access to it. Equivalent attention rarely is paid to questions of old knowledge. To what extent should the law, and particularly intellectual property law, focus on the durability of information and knowledge? To what extent does the law do so already, and to what effect? This article begins to explore those questions. Along the way, the article takes up distinctions among different types ...