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Articles 1 - 13 of 13

Full-Text Articles in Law

Criticizing The Courts: A Lawyer’S Duty (Iii), Roger J. Miner '56 Jan 2000

Criticizing The Courts: A Lawyer’S Duty (Iii), Roger J. Miner '56

Lawyers and the Legal Profession

No abstract provided.


In Praise Of Thermostats, John W. Reed Jan 2000

In Praise Of Thermostats, John W. Reed

Other Publications

Fifty years ago, a famous book was published that chronicled the sea change then occurring in society. David Reisman's The Lonely Crowdl made us aware of the decline of concern for the common good and the rise of the search for individual meaning. What was going on at that time was one of the most profound cultural changes that has ever taken place in such a short time. It was not just the beginning of the Me Generation but, it turned out, the beginning of the Me Culture, which continues to this day.


Mandatory Arbitration: Bane Or Boon?, Theodore St. Antoine Jan 2000

Mandatory Arbitration: Bane Or Boon?, Theodore St. Antoine

Other Publications

Buy a new car that turns out to be a lemon and you may find you can't sue. Fine print in the sales contract often restricts you to arbitration. That means presenting your case before a private person instead of a judge and jury. And the arbitrator may be someone drawn from a panel compiled by the car seller.


Dressed For Excess: How Hollywood Affects The Professional Behavior Of Lawyers, Nancy B. Rapoport Jan 2000

Dressed For Excess: How Hollywood Affects The Professional Behavior Of Lawyers, Nancy B. Rapoport

Scholarly Works

This article discusses two related points: first, that the way in which movies portray lawyers shapes how clients view effective/ineffective lawyer behavior, and second, that the portrayal also helps lawyers to forget appropriate professional behavior.


Michigan's Minority Graduates In Practice: Answers To Methodological Queries, Richard O. Lempert, David L. Chambers, Terry K. Adams Jan 2000

Michigan's Minority Graduates In Practice: Answers To Methodological Queries, Richard O. Lempert, David L. Chambers, Terry K. Adams

Articles

Before making a few remarks in response to those who commented on our article (Lempert, Chambers, and Adams 2000), we would like to express our gratitude to the editors of Law and Social Inquiry for securing these commentaries and to the people who wrote them. The comments both highlight the potential uses to which our research and similar studies may be put and give us the opportunity to address methodological concerns and questions that other readers of our article may share with those who commented on it. The responses to our work are of two types. Professors Nelson, Payne, and ...


Michigan's Minority Graduates In Practice: The River Runs Through Law School, Richard O. Lempert, David L. Chambers, Terry K. Adams Jan 2000

Michigan's Minority Graduates In Practice: The River Runs Through Law School, Richard O. Lempert, David L. Chambers, Terry K. Adams

Articles

This paper reports the results of a 1997-98 survey designed to explore the careers of the University of Michigan Law School's minority graduates from the classes of 1970 through 1996, and of a random sample of Michigan Law School's white alumni who graduated during the same years. It is to date the most detailed quantitative exploration of how minority students fare after they graduate from law school and enter law practice or related careers. The results reveal that almost all of Michigan Law School's minority graduates pass a bar exam and go on to have careers that ...


When Daddy Wants Out: The Issue Of Paternity, Jane C. Murphy, Cheri Wyron Levin Jan 2000

When Daddy Wants Out: The Issue Of Paternity, Jane C. Murphy, Cheri Wyron Levin

All Faculty Scholarship

Perhaps you've seen the signs along a number of major highways in Maryland. A pregnant Mona Lisa advertising a DNA testing company with the caption "Who's the Daddy?" With the rise in the number of children born out of wedlock in Maryland in the last several decades, paternity testing is becoming routine and family law practitioners are handling more cases in which the father or mother or both are trying to change who is named as the legal father in a paternity or divorce judgment. The law governing such cases has changed substantially since 1995. This article will ...


Taking Myths Seriously: An Essay For Lawyers, Donald C. Langevoort Jan 2000

Taking Myths Seriously: An Essay For Lawyers, Donald C. Langevoort

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

The specific idea I want to explore has to do with the motivational power of myths and illusions on a personal level. To take a mundane example, people are often told to "believe in themselves." The underlying idea seems to be that high self confidence is an important motivator, especially in competitive settings like school, sports, business and the professions. This is not the idle talk of family and friends; millions of dollars are spent each year by people and their employers on motivational books and programs that offer endless variations on this simple theme in an effort to bolster ...


Defending Defending: The Case For Unmitigated Zeal On Behalf Of People Who Do Terrible Things, Abbe Smith Jan 2000

Defending Defending: The Case For Unmitigated Zeal On Behalf Of People Who Do Terrible Things, Abbe Smith

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

Although defending defending may be an endless pursuit, I cannot help taking it on. I am, after all, a defender myself, and defending fellow defenders seems to go with the territory. Of course, attacks on criminal defenders do not come out of nowhere - difficult and complex questions often arise in criminal defense work. Unfortunately, the questions that are raised in the aftermath of a high profile case such as the Abner Louima case are usually the easy ones - questions that have more to do with the nature of the adversarial system than with the values or ethics of individual defense ...


Hard Choices: Thoughts For New Lawyers, David C. Vladeck Jan 2000

Hard Choices: Thoughts For New Lawyers, David C. Vladeck

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

Rarely do law schools challenge students to examine their assumptions about what being a lawyer really means. Seldom do law schools undertake a probing examination of the role that lawyers play in society and the choices that lawyers have to make in terms of how they spend their working lives. For example, how many of you have a clue about the basic facts of our profession? How many lawyers there are in the United States? What do they do? What percentage work for the government? For large law firms? For small firms? For legal services organizations? For public interest groups ...


The Future Debate On Multidisciplinary Practice In The United States, Sydney M. Cone Iii. Jan 2000

The Future Debate On Multidisciplinary Practice In The United States, Sydney M. Cone Iii.

Articles & Chapters

No abstract provided.


Learning And Serving: Pro Bono Legal Services By Law Students, David L. Chambers, Cynthia F. Adcock Jan 2000

Learning And Serving: Pro Bono Legal Services By Law Students, David L. Chambers, Cynthia F. Adcock

Articles

All lawyers' codes of professional ethics in the United States expect members of the bar to perform legal services for low-income persons. In practice, as we all know, many lawyers perform a great deal of such service while others do little or none. By much the same token, the accreditation rules of the American Bar Association urge all law schools to provide students with opportunities to do pro bono legal work; by much the same token, some schools in the United States have extensive programs for their students but many do not. In 1998, the Association of American Law Schools ...


Building Pediatric Law Careers: The University Of Michigan Law School Experience, Suellyn Scarnecchia, Melissa Breger, Frank E. Vandervort, Naomi Woloshin Jan 2000

Building Pediatric Law Careers: The University Of Michigan Law School Experience, Suellyn Scarnecchia, Melissa Breger, Frank E. Vandervort, Naomi Woloshin

Articles

There are several obstacles to training and supporting pediatric lawyers. Children are a relatively new group of clients and law schools have not traditionally provided pediatric training. The required training is particularly challenging to deliver because it is inherently interdisciplinary, requiring faculty and students to look outside of the law school to obtain necessary knowledge. The greatest obstacle to developing the careers of pediatric lawyers is the low pay and low prestige typically afforded children's lawyers. As a result, law students reasonably question the likelihood of developing a successful career in the field. The number of available jobs is ...