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Series

Legislation

Employees

1980

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Law

Review Of The Landrum-Griffin Act: Twenty Years Of Federal Protection Of Union Members' Rights, By J. R. Bellace And A. D. Berkowitz, Theodore J. St. Antoine Jan 1980

Review Of The Landrum-Griffin Act: Twenty Years Of Federal Protection Of Union Members' Rights, By J. R. Bellace And A. D. Berkowitz, Theodore J. St. Antoine

Reviews

In the innocent closing years of the 1950s, the American public fastened on union democracy as the most burning issue of the day. No other subject produced as much mail for Congress. The 229-201 count by which the Landrum-Griffin bill was substituted for the House Labor Committee's bill on labor-management reporting and disclosure constituted the largest total vote in the history of the House of Representatives. Significantly, however, that vote had little if any bearing on union members' rights. What distinguished Landrum-Griffin from the Committee's bill was its stiff new curbs on picketing and boycotts. As Senator John ...


National Labor Policy: Reflections And Distortions Of Social Justice, Theodore J. St. Antoine Jan 1980

National Labor Policy: Reflections And Distortions Of Social Justice, Theodore J. St. Antoine

Articles

The impulse behind much of American labor law is profoundly moral. The sufferings and indignities inflicted on working men, women, and even children as the industrial revolution enveloped the western world during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries led many thoughtful observers to focus their attention on what was commonly called the "social question." Certain issues have been treated almost as if they posed questions of good and evil, when all they actually presented were problems of finding a proper balance of power between labor and management. This article shall develop these themes in several specific contexts.