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Series

Labor and Employment Law

Privacy

2012

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Law

The Benefit Of Adopting Comprehensive Standards Of Monitoring Employee Technology Use In The Workplace, Karin M. Mika Sep 2012

The Benefit Of Adopting Comprehensive Standards Of Monitoring Employee Technology Use In The Workplace, Karin M. Mika

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

This article will examine issues as they relate to the privacy of employees’ lives given that nearly everything can be discovered by some form of electronic monitoring. It will posit that most laws as they exist today do little to apprise either the employer or the employee as to what type of electronic monitoring of personal communications is acceptable. It will further propose that most employer policies related to scrutinizing employee electronic communications are vague and unsuitable. The article will conclude that, given the leeway employers tend to be given (often justifiably so) in monitoring employees there is little chance ...


Privacy In The Workplace: Are Collective Bargaining Agreements A Place To Start Formulating More Uniform Standards?, Karin Mika Jan 2012

Privacy In The Workplace: Are Collective Bargaining Agreements A Place To Start Formulating More Uniform Standards?, Karin Mika

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

This paper discusses ambiguities related to laws in employee privacy and posits that this is problematic for both employers and employees. The article discusses how private employers have almost no restrictions when it comes to employee monitoring, especially when there is an announced (albeit vague) policy. The article then suggests that unions have at least some negotiating power in terms of setting standards for when an employee may be disciplined and thus, labor unions have at least a modicum of power in negotiating clear rules regarding employee monitoring. The paper further suggests that clear policies aren't a bad thing ...