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Selected Works

Commercial Law

Selected Works

Chang-hsien (Robert) TSAI

Articles 1 - 4 of 4

Full-Text Articles in Law

Legal Transplantation Or Legal Innovation? Equity-Crowdfunding Regulation In Taiwan After Title Iii Of The U.S. Jobs Act, Chang-Hsien Tsai Dec 2015

Legal Transplantation Or Legal Innovation? Equity-Crowdfunding Regulation In Taiwan After Title Iii Of The U.S. Jobs Act, Chang-Hsien Tsai

Chang-hsien (Robert) TSAI

Crowdfunding has caused a worldwide revolution in early-stage startup financing during recent years.  In the United States, the expansion of for-profit crowdfunding platforms to fund small businesses and startups prompted Congress to pass the game-changing law on equity crowdfunding, Title III of the JOBS Act in 2012 (“CROWDFUND Act”).  While its specific rules and regulations as adopted by the SEC takes effect this year, the substance of the JOBS Act as a whole is geared more towards the goal of capital formation, over the historically promoted goal of investor protection.  The use of equity crowdfunding has extended over to Taiwan ...


Exit, Voice And International Jurisdictional Competition: A Case Study Of The Evolution Of Taiwan’S Regulatory Regime For Outward Investment In Mainland China, 1997-2008, Chang-Hsien Tsai Dec 2011

Exit, Voice And International Jurisdictional Competition: A Case Study Of The Evolution Of Taiwan’S Regulatory Regime For Outward Investment In Mainland China, 1997-2008, Chang-Hsien Tsai

Chang-hsien (Robert) TSAI

This Article explores the interplay of demand and supply forces in the market for law through international jurisdictional competition led by offshore financial centers. To do so it uses the example of the evolution of a regulatory regime imposed by an onshore jurisdiction, Taiwan, to control outward investment into mainland China (“China-investment”). The argument is that jurisdictional competition brought about by capital mobility or exit will provoke legal changes to prevent the departure of capital when laws reduce the value of remaining within the jurisdiction. The case study is used to examine the extent to which jurisdictional competition fuelled by ...


International Jurisdictional Competition Under Globalization: From The U.S. Regulation Of Foreign Private Issuers To Taiwan’S Restrictions On Outward Investment In Mainland China, Chang-Hsien Tsai Dec 2010

International Jurisdictional Competition Under Globalization: From The U.S. Regulation Of Foreign Private Issuers To Taiwan’S Restrictions On Outward Investment In Mainland China, Chang-Hsien Tsai

Chang-hsien (Robert) TSAI

Drawing a lesson from the story that the Sarbanes-Oxley Act drives away foreign issuers and then their physical exit provokes a change in the U.S. regulation of non-U.S. issuers, this article takes as another case study the phenomenon that Taiwanese firms list shares overseas, to further test how usual law market demand and supply forces (or underlying exit and voice rights) interplay under international jurisdictional competition. Put simply, both cases of the U.S. and Taiwan significantly elaborate that law market forces underlying international jurisdictional competition are similarly at work even on both sides of the Pacific Ocean ...


Demand And Supply Forces In The Market For Law Interplaying Through Jurisdictional Competition: Basic Theories And Cases, Chang-Hsien Tsai Aug 2010

Demand And Supply Forces In The Market For Law Interplaying Through Jurisdictional Competition: Basic Theories And Cases, Chang-Hsien Tsai

Chang-hsien (Robert) TSAI

Inspired by corporate charter competitions in the 19th-century U.S. and contemporary Europe as well as the negative impact of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 on the U.S. cross-listing market, this article draws positive lessons from the above stories that demand and supply forces underlying jurisdictional competition constrains regulating jurisdictions from disregarding business demands and from imposing excessive regulation, and that jurisdictional competition brought about by mobility or exit would push for legal flexibility. Through the positive arguments developed in this article, regulatory jurisdictions in East Asia could, to an extent, understand the true costs and benefits of regulation ...