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Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Art

2014

Articles 1 - 5 of 5

Full-Text Articles in Law

Blogging As Art, Art As Research, Lucas Ihlein Jan 2014

Blogging As Art, Art As Research, Lucas Ihlein

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Since 2003, I have used a blog to collect and publish my ideas about art and social engagement, or to write short accounts of artworks I have witnessed and participated in (Ihlein 2003). What motivates me to blog in this way is the desire to leave behind an experiential document of ephemeral art practices. Conceptual art, performance art, Happenings, Fluxus events and Expanded Cinema: all these constitute important moments in avant-garde art history which I 'know' only by accessing fragmentary, in complete archival documents - photographs, videotapes, artists' statements. For artists working today, these archives make a significant contribution to our ...


A Robot Walks Into A Room: Google Art Project, The New Aesthetic, And The Accident Of Art, Susan (Su) Ballard Jan 2014

A Robot Walks Into A Room: Google Art Project, The New Aesthetic, And The Accident Of Art, Susan (Su) Ballard

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

On the 1st February 2011 Google unleashed the Google Art Project, a new way to engage with the major collections of the world’s art galleries. With the Google Art Project came a new way of viewing, not just art but the other objects that inhabit art galleries. Google Art Project depends on a robot looking machine. This aesthetic machine is a different form of digital material that has entered into what have for a long time been quiet still spaces for human, and not machine contemplation. With an equal focus on the spaces between things as much as on ...


Book Review: The Art Of Censorship In Postwar Japan. Studies Of The Weatherhead East Asian Institute. By Kirsten Cather, Rowena G. Ward Jan 2014

Book Review: The Art Of Censorship In Postwar Japan. Studies Of The Weatherhead East Asian Institute. By Kirsten Cather, Rowena G. Ward

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

The practice of censorship is a divisive issue that is often justified on moral reasons rather than aesthetic or legalistic ones. It is perhaps because of the claims to morality rather than to the law that it is relatively rare for censorship (or more accurately in Japan’s case, obscenity) to be the subject of criminal trials. Yet, in Japan, from the occupation years through to the present day, there has been on average one high profile censorship trial per decade. In The Art of Censorship in Postwar Japan, Kirsten Cather considers seven such censorship trials held between the 1950s ...


From Camp To Gay To Queer: David Mcdiarmid And Hiv/Aids Art, Marcus O'Donnell Jan 2014

From Camp To Gay To Queer: David Mcdiarmid And Hiv/Aids Art, Marcus O'Donnell

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

At the end of July, Melbourne hosted the 20th International AIDS Conference. A huge red AIDS 2014 sign perched on the Swanston Street Bridge between Flinders Street Station and the Melbourne Concert Hall.

The Global AIDS Village was in action at the other end of Southbank with a variety of displays from HIV/AIDS organisations from all over the world. One of the many associated events was the marvellous exhibition of gay artist David McDiarmid’s work, When This You See Remember Me. It is still on display at the National Gallery of Victoria (NGV).

For a brief moment the ...


Philology, Or The Art Of Befriending The Text, Ika Willis Jan 2014

Philology, Or The Art Of Befriending The Text, Ika Willis

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

This essay examines the 1960s/1970s' transformation of the text as an object of reading, and argues for an equivalent transformation of philology as a practice of reading. I focus on the oscillation between reading as literacy (the capacity to recognize and decipher a given language) and reading as interpretation (the capacity to respond to the text). This oscillation itself results from an irreducible ambiguity in the text: both a stable verbal artifact with a determinable form and a bearer of indeterminate meaning. Reading Roland Barthes's critique of philology and Ursula Le Guin's science-fictional paean to its possibilities ...