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College of William & Mary Law School

Freedom of Religion

William & Mary Bill of Rights Journal

First Amendment

2001

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Law

Religious Land Use And Institutionalized Persons Act Of 2000: The Land Use Provisions Are Both Unconstitutional And Unnecessary, Ada-Marie Walsh Dec 2001

Religious Land Use And Institutionalized Persons Act Of 2000: The Land Use Provisions Are Both Unconstitutional And Unnecessary, Ada-Marie Walsh

William & Mary Bill of Rights Journal

The Religious Land Use and Institutionalized Persons Act of 2000 was Congress 'response to the Supreme Court's striking down of the Religious Freedom Restoration Act in City of Boerne v. Flores. In promulgating the Religious Land Use and Institutionalized Persons Act, Congress, inter alia, sought to protect the free exercise of religion from excessive governmental meddling while remedying discrimination suffered by religious individuals and groups in the area of land use. In dealing solely with land use provisions of the RLUIPA, the author argues that the Religious Land Use and lnstitutionalized Person Act is unconstitutional because it violates the ...


Religion, Rationality, And Special Treatment, Jane Rutherford Feb 2001

Religion, Rationality, And Special Treatment, Jane Rutherford

William & Mary Bill of Rights Journal

Religion has always played a major role in American society, both politically and socially. Its influence on the Constitution is expressed in the Establishment and Free Exercise Clauses. Why is religion given special treatment by the Constitution? In this Article, Professor Jane Rutherford makes a structural argument for religious liberty. Rutherford posits that religion is treated differently not because of the content of its views, but because of the various other functions it serves, such as providing voices for outsiders and advancing non-market values. Rutherford concludes that we should return to more serious enforcement of the Establishment and Free Exercise ...