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Articles 1 - 11 of 11

Full-Text Articles in Law

Copyright And International Trips Compliance (Symposium: Fifth Annual Conference On International Intellectual Property Law And Policy), Whitmore Gray, Shira Perlmutter, Jerome H. Reichman Jan 1997

Copyright And International Trips Compliance (Symposium: Fifth Annual Conference On International Intellectual Property Law And Policy), Whitmore Gray, Shira Perlmutter, Jerome H. Reichman

Other Publications

MS. PERLMUTTER: We have heard today about copyright in two different regions of the world, in Central and Eastern Europe' and in China. In recent years there has been an increasing convergence in the substance of national laws in different regions of the world. One of the major factors has been the TRIPs Agreement? I will focus on the current efforts toward implementing the TRIPs Agreement, and this will be a procedure-oriented talk.


Of Substantial Interest: Third Parties Under Gatt, Chi Carmody Jan 1997

Of Substantial Interest: Third Parties Under Gatt, Chi Carmody

Michigan Journal of International Law

This article's examination of the status of third parties under GATT is important for several reasons, one of which is the proliferation of third party participation as demonstrated by Bananas III. A second reason for its importance is that there has been little written about third parties under GATT. This neglect stands in sharp contrast to ample literature on the related subject of greater public participation in the WTO. The oversight could be a function of GATT dispute resolution, which did not always enjoy the level of public attention it garners today. Until recently the GATT system handled no ...


Race-Based Affirmative Action And International Law, Jordan J. Paust Jan 1997

Race-Based Affirmative Action And International Law, Jordan J. Paust

Michigan Journal of International Law

International law, which is part of the supreme law of the United States, provides significant affirmation of the legal propriety of race-based affirmative action. At least two human rights treaties ratified by the United States are particularly useful in identifying the acceptability of certain measures of affirmative action as well as the duty to take special and concrete measures of affirmative action in certain circumstances. Such a duty is not merely based in supreme federal law, relevant to decision-making at federal and state levels, but is also contained in federal policy relevant to the constitutional precept of federal preemption. Treaty-based ...


Two Centuries Of Participation: Ngos And International Governance, Steve Charnovitz Jan 1997

Two Centuries Of Participation: Ngos And International Governance, Steve Charnovitz

Michigan Journal of International Law

This article explores the past and present role of NGOs in international governance. Part One reviews the history of NGO involvement, focusing on the period between 1775 and 1949. It shows how NGO activism helped to engender international organizations. Part Two examines some key issues that arise from the expanding involvement of NGOs. It catalogs the pros and cons of an active NGO role, discusses various functions that NGOs fulfill, and lists ten techniques of NGO participation. Part Two also considers a hypothesis that NGO involvement is cyclical.


The Role Of National Courts In International Trade Relations, Meinhard Hilf Jan 1997

The Role Of National Courts In International Trade Relations, Meinhard Hilf

Michigan Journal of International Law

Part I of this article identifies and analyzes some modern trends in judicial review in the area of international relations. Section Part II then examines and briefly discusses the existence of judicial review for both national and international levels of protection and the possibilities for linking the two. A major part, Part III, is devoted to the specific role of national courts within the WTO system. Finally, Part IV draws conclusions and suggests some means for improving the judicial review offered by national courts and for linking them to the interstate dispute settlement on the international level.


Decisionmaking And Dispute Resolution In The Free Trade Area Of The Americas: An Essay In Trade Governance, Frank J. Garcia Jan 1997

Decisionmaking And Dispute Resolution In The Free Trade Area Of The Americas: An Essay In Trade Governance, Frank J. Garcia

Michigan Journal of International Law

This Article examines certain theoretical and structural issues to be resolved in creation of the FTAA's governing institutions, and proposes an outline for these institutions, drawing upon regime theory's analysis of international organizations, the range of existing trade institutions found among the hemisphere's RTAs, and indications of the Summit countries' present goals and interests. The Article begins by summarizing Kenneth Abbott and Duncan Snidal's concept of "mesoinstitutions," a new regime theory tool for identifying the roles played and benefits conferred by 1Os in international relations. Parts I.B and I.C then apply mesoinstitutions theory to ...


The Meaning Of "Advice And Consent": The Senate's Constitutional Role In Treatymaking, Howard R. Sklamberg Jan 1997

The Meaning Of "Advice And Consent": The Senate's Constitutional Role In Treatymaking, Howard R. Sklamberg

Michigan Journal of International Law

This article analyzes the role that the Constitution assigns to the Senate in treatymaking and the implications of this role on the relationship between the President and the Senate. Part I examines the meaning of "advice and consent" in the Treaty Clause. It discusses the origins of the phrase "advice and consent," the history of the drafting of the Treaty Clause, and the implications of the Framers' decision to include the Treaty Clause in Article II of the Constitution.


Securing The Peace Dividend In The Middle East: Amending Gatt Article Xxiv To Allow Sectoral Preferences In Free Trade Areas, David R. Karasik Jan 1997

Securing The Peace Dividend In The Middle East: Amending Gatt Article Xxiv To Allow Sectoral Preferences In Free Trade Areas, David R. Karasik

Michigan Journal of International Law

How should Middle East nations structure their future economic relationships to secure their peaceful reconciliation while simultaneously fulfilling their WTO obligations? This note suggests two solutions to this quandary. First, the newly emerging bloc of peace-declaring nations in the Middle East should consider establishing a regional free trade area. However, instead of reducing the tariffs of "substantially all" of the region's products as would normally be required by Article XXIV of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) 9-the authoritative provision regulating free trade areas-this note argues that a Middle East free trade area should reduce trade barriers ...


Article 36 Of The Vienna Convention On Consular Relations: A Search For The Right To Consul, Mark J. Kadish Jan 1997

Article 36 Of The Vienna Convention On Consular Relations: A Search For The Right To Consul, Mark J. Kadish

Michigan Journal of International Law

This paper addresses Article 36 of the Vienna Convention on Consular Relations, a treaty provision which is often violated by the United States.


Trade Policy Harmonization: Too Much Of A Good Thing?, Alexander W. Sierck Jan 1997

Trade Policy Harmonization: Too Much Of A Good Thing?, Alexander W. Sierck

Michigan Journal of International Law

Review of Fair Trade and Harmonization: Prerequisites for Free Trade? by Jagdish N. Bhagwati & Robert E. Hudec


Making International Refugee Law Relevant Again: A Proposal For Collectivized And Solution-Oriented Protection, James C. Hathaway, R. Alexander Neve Jan 1997

Making International Refugee Law Relevant Again: A Proposal For Collectivized And Solution-Oriented Protection, James C. Hathaway, R. Alexander Neve

Articles

International refugee law is in crisis. Even as armed conflict and human rights abuse continue to force individuals and groups to flee their home countries, many governments are withdrawing from the legal duty to provide refugees with the protection they require. While governments proclaim a willingness to assist refugees as a matter of political discretion or humanitarian goodwill, they appear committed to a pattern of defensive strategies designed to avoid international legal responsibility toward involuntary migrants. Some see this shift away from a legal paradigm of refugee protection as a source for enhanced operational flexibility in the face of changed ...