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Full-Text Articles in Law

Great White Shark Bycatch Reduction Problems In The California/Oregon Drift Gillnet Fishery, Andrew J. Graf Jun 2013

Great White Shark Bycatch Reduction Problems In The California/Oregon Drift Gillnet Fishery, Andrew J. Graf

Golden Gate University Environmental Law Journal

Part I of this Comment explores the problems of great white shark bycatch by examining the white shark’s susceptibility to bycatch and the Fishery responsible for a significant portion of white shark bycatch. Part II discusses the federal statutes and regulations applicable to bycatch and the Fishery. Part III provides recommendations for reducing white shark bycatch in the future by modifying current federal statutes, amending existing regulations, and increasing research efforts.


Derailing Powder River Basin Coal Exports: Legal Mechanisms To Regulate Fugitive Coal Dust From Rail Transportation, Tovah R. Trimming Jun 2013

Derailing Powder River Basin Coal Exports: Legal Mechanisms To Regulate Fugitive Coal Dust From Rail Transportation, Tovah R. Trimming

Golden Gate University Environmental Law Journal

Coal trains are known as “black snakes.” The name aptly describes the miles of uncovered rail cars bearing the black cargo as they slither along the tracks. During the journey from coal mines to their final destinations, coal trains shed plumes of coal dust from the tops of the train cars. As the dust spews from the rail cars, it fills the surrounding air with harmful substances like mercury, lead, cadmium, arsenic, manganese, beryllium, and chromium. When the dust settles, these substances are deposited in soil and water, harming plant, animal, and marine life. Environmental consequences from coal dust are ...


A Feasible Alternative: The Legal Implications Of Aquaculture In The United States And The Promise Of Sustainable Urban Aquaculture Systems, Garrett Wheeler Jun 2013

A Feasible Alternative: The Legal Implications Of Aquaculture In The United States And The Promise Of Sustainable Urban Aquaculture Systems, Garrett Wheeler

Golden Gate University Environmental Law Journal

The world’s ocean fish stocks are in peril. A 2011 report issued by an international team of marine scientists found that the world’s marine species face threats “unprecedented in human history” with “loss of both large, long-lived and small fish species causing widespread impacts on marine ecosystems.” Nutrient runoff, introductions of non-native species, climate change, over fishing, and physical disturbance are all contributing to the oceans’ decline. Meanwhile, global per capita seafood consumption is at an all-time high, as the Earth’s growing population continues to enjoy healthy, protein-laden nourishment.

The resulting situation is a stark example of ...


Lawyers Write Treaties, Engineers Build Dikes, Gods Of Weather Ignore Both: Making Transboundary Waters Agreements Relevant, Flexible, And Resilient In A Time Of Global Climate Chanage, Glen Hearns, Richard Kyle Paisley Jun 2013

Lawyers Write Treaties, Engineers Build Dikes, Gods Of Weather Ignore Both: Making Transboundary Waters Agreements Relevant, Flexible, And Resilient In A Time Of Global Climate Chanage, Glen Hearns, Richard Kyle Paisley

Golden Gate University Environmental Law Journal

This Article identifies and critically reviews the importance of adaptability and flexibility in treaties and institutional arrangements by providing resilience in the face of the anticipated impact of climate change on the good governance of international waters. Building greater resilience and adaptability into international waters agreements is essential to address the uncertainties in hydrological and ocean processes associated with climate change. There is also growing consensus that conflict over natural resources can be linked to extreme events and climate change, and this is receiving increased attention in foreign policy development. Surface water resources are especially vulnerable to the anticipated consequences ...


Where Will All The Waste Go?: Utilizing Extended Producer Responsibility Framework Laws To Achieve Zero Waste, Anthony A. Austin Jun 2013

Where Will All The Waste Go?: Utilizing Extended Producer Responsibility Framework Laws To Achieve Zero Waste, Anthony A. Austin

Golden Gate University Environmental Law Journal

The United States has a waste problem. It represents only five percent of the world population, yet it generates twenty-five to thirty percent of the world’s waste. In 2008, the United States generated 389.5 million tons of municipal solid waste (MSW). As our economy and population continue to grow, our waste will continue to grow as well. The obvious dilemma is that all of this waste, the byproduct of our economic advances, creates significant adverse environmental and public health effects when landfilled or incinerated.

This Article explores the use of extended producer responsibility (EPR) laws to achieve the ...


In The Edition, Vadim Sidelnikov, Dawn Withers Jun 2013

In The Edition, Vadim Sidelnikov, Dawn Withers

Golden Gate University Environmental Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Table Of Contents Jun 2013

Table Of Contents

Golden Gate University Environmental Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Masthead Jun 2013

Masthead

Golden Gate University Environmental Law Journal

No abstract provided.