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Full-Text Articles in Education

Seeking Unity Despite Differences: Female Muslim College Students And Cultural Bridges Of Social Media, Toqa Hassan Dec 2018

Seeking Unity Despite Differences: Female Muslim College Students And Cultural Bridges Of Social Media, Toqa Hassan

Journal of Research, Assessment, and Practice in Higher Education

Through the lens of co-cultural and social construction of reality, this research explores the impact of social media on the lives of female Muslim college students in the United States. Two research questions were posed: 1) How social media allows female Muslim college students to bridge the gap between minority groups in their communities and 2) How do they perceive the presence of diversity among themselves online and offline. Results of 11 semi-structured interviews showed that social media allows female Muslim college students to unite with others globally and expand their local circle of friends to grow beyond their socially ...


Perspectives On Women’S Development: Instructional Implications In Higher Education, Sonia Michael Mar 2012

Perspectives On Women’S Development: Instructional Implications In Higher Education, Sonia Michael

Kentucky Journal of Excellence in College Teaching and Learning

Theories of development typically explain developmental progress as a linear process with individuals moving through stages of development and becoming more independent and autonomous with each stage. While there are several theories of development, all of them suggest that there are gender differences in the way individuals develop. Perspectives on women’s development have become more prevalent with the growing awareness related to gender equity issues in education and the workplace. These theories of development suggest that women have a need to feel connected and that they tend to define themselves in terms of their relationships with others. With women ...


Women In Power, Margaret A. Mckenna Mar 2007

Women In Power, Margaret A. Mckenna

New England Journal of Public Policy

The country is filled with powerful women, but women in power remain significantly underrepresented across a variety of professional fields, in business, academe, politics, and the media. With more women enrolled in colleges today than men, continued underrepresentation of women in leadership roles throughout society is not just morally unacceptable, it is economically damaging. The nation needs to maximize all human capital, in order to meet our own challenges and stay competitive in this global economy. Young women need to be supported in developing the knowledge and skills necessary for being leaders and catalysts for change. Reflecting on a career ...


Diversification Of A University Faculty: Women Faculty In The Mit Schools Of Science And Engineering, Nancy Hopkins Mar 2007

Diversification Of A University Faculty: Women Faculty In The Mit Schools Of Science And Engineering, Nancy Hopkins

New England Journal of Public Policy

A broadly diverse faculty is critical to MIT’s educational mission, and significant efforts have been made to achieve a faculty whose diversity reflects that of the students we train. To assess the success of some of these efforts, I examined the percentage of women faculty in the Schools of Science and Engineering over time. In Science, the increased number (and percentage) of women faculty today is the consequence of: pressures associated with the civil rights movement in the early 1970s; unusual efforts between 1996 and 2000 by former Dean of Science Bob Birgeneau in response to the 1996 Report ...


Editor's Note, Padraig O'Malley Mar 2007

Editor's Note, Padraig O'Malley

New England Journal of Public Policy

In 1990, the New England Journal of Public Policy published a special issue on Women. The subject was women & economic empowerment. The authors found that while women had made significant gains during the 1970s and 1980s in many spheres relating to the workplace, true equity with respect to their male peers was still elusive, and gender bias, despite remedial legislation, continued to be the acceptable norm.

Seventeen years on, another group of women, under the direction of guest editor Sherry H. Penney, herself a contributor to the 1990 journal, looks anew at some of these issues and expands the horizons of their inquiry to other fields where women have struggled to get access. The authors find that despite many gains (female students outnumber men at the undergraduate level and in many graduate and professional areas), bias is still deeply embedded in our socio/economic/political ethos, despite there being some very visible "firsts" - first Speaker of the House of Representatives, Nancy Pelosi; and first female president of Harvard, Drew Gilpin Faust; and first female Democratic Party frontrunner for president, Hillary Clinton - there are still barriers that need to be razed, and old problems of inequality, whether questions of equal payor access to tenure, that need to be addressed.


Numbers Are Not Enough: Women In Higher Education In The 21st Century, Sherry H. Penney, Jennifer Brown, Laura Mcphie Oliveria Mar 2007

Numbers Are Not Enough: Women In Higher Education In The 21st Century, Sherry H. Penney, Jennifer Brown, Laura Mcphie Oliveria

New England Journal of Public Policy

Women are now the majority of students in institutions of higher education in the United States, and in many ways women as students and faculty have seen significant progress. But numbers do not tell the whole story. Subtle forms of discrimination continue to exist, and the higher up the pyramid you go, the fewer women are to be found, whether among tenured faculty, as presidents and provosts or as board members and board chairs. Many steps can be taken to improve the situation. Some institutions are recognizing that. We note some positive changes and discuss areas where improvement is needed ...


In Quest Of True Equality: A Study Of The Climate For Women At Gettysburg Since 1975, Sara Gustafson Jan 2004

In Quest Of True Equality: A Study Of The Climate For Women At Gettysburg Since 1975, Sara Gustafson

The Gettysburg Historical Journal

In 2003, the election of Katherine Haley Will as Gettysburg College’s thirteenth president began a new era for women on campus. Will will be the first female president in the history of the college, and her election signifies the tremendous legal and psychological changes that have shaken both the college and the nation over the past quarter century. Federal legislation, the slowly-broadening vision of the school’s administration, and the proactive stance taken by women themselves have contributed to making Gettysburg College a place of seemingly strong gender equality.


Women As Leaders In Higher Education: Blending Personal Experience With A Sociological Viewpoint, Dolores E. Cross Sep 1994

Women As Leaders In Higher Education: Blending Personal Experience With A Sociological Viewpoint, Dolores E. Cross

Trotter Review

A theme often repeated in the writings of C. Wright Mills is that of the "sociological imagination." What prompts our sociological imagination, he says, is a blending of our knowledge about the social sciences with our personal history. In my experience, it is important for leaders to have a sociological imagination. What follows are observations of my experience during my tenure as president of the New York State Higher Education Services Corporation (HESC), and in my current position as president of Chicago State University.