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Full-Text Articles in Education

Differences And Similarities Between U.S. And Non-U.S. Citizens In Graduate School Perceptions, Experiences And Career Preparation, Fred Cline Oct 2013

Differences And Similarities Between U.S. And Non-U.S. Citizens In Graduate School Perceptions, Experiences And Career Preparation, Fred Cline

NERA Conference Proceedings 2013

International students account for a significant percentage of enrollees in graduate programs in the United States. Nearly 30% of the doctoral degrees awarded in the U.S. go to non-U.S. citizens, and about two-thirds remain in the U.S. for their career. This study compares survey results from 1,000 international and 4,200 U.S. respondents on their beliefs about the value of a graduate degree, the quality and sources of information they received about graduate school and careers, and their job satisfaction after completing their degree. Findings suggest that international students need additional support and information when ...


Why & How Instructors Grade Participation In, Susan L. Rogers Oct 2009

Why & How Instructors Grade Participation In, Susan L. Rogers

NERA Conference Proceedings 2009

Although active engagement and participation in college courses has been shown to lead to increased learning (Weaver & Qi, 2005), instructors often struggle to get their students to participate more in class. This issue is sometimes addressed by including "participation" in grading criteria. The current study investigates this convention by identifying current instructor attitudes and practices towards grading student participation in undergraduate classrooms. To this end, a survey has been created and piloted amongst university instructors of varying disciplines. Data is presented in the context of current literature, and relationships between attitudes and practices in grading participation will be explored.


A Validation Of The Collaborative Alternative Magnet School For Leadership (Cams) Student Survey, Wei Xia, Mary E. Yakimowski, Maureen Bransfield, Carolyn Mcnally Oct 2008

A Validation Of The Collaborative Alternative Magnet School For Leadership (Cams) Student Survey, Wei Xia, Mary E. Yakimowski, Maureen Bransfield, Carolyn Mcnally

NERA Conference Proceedings 2008

The Collaborative Alternative Magnet School for Leadership (CAMS) Student Survey is intended to assess students' leadership development and skills. The survey was originally adapted by the Area Cooperative Educational Services (ACES) from Connecticut's Common Core of Learning, and was recently revised and used by CAMS. There are four basic aspects in the CAMS Student Survey: responsibility, persistence, respect for culture diversity, and sense of community. In this paper, the authors write about the exploratory factor analysis (EFA) that was conducted to explore the factor structure of the survey, and also report the reliability analysis results. Recommendations are provided about ...