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Grand Valley Forum, Volume 001, Number 40, August 22, 1977, Grand Valley State University Aug 1977

Grand Valley Forum, Volume 001, Number 40, August 22, 1977, Grand Valley State University

1976-1977, Volume 1

Grand Valley Forum is Grand Valley State's faculty and staff newsletter, published from 1976 to the present.


Heg77-76 Pressing Methods (Revised April 1981), Thelma Thompson Jan 1977

Heg77-76 Pressing Methods (Revised April 1981), Thelma Thompson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses pressing methods that will not mar or distort the fabric.

A skillful job of pressing requires time, practice and the use of methods that will not mar the fabric. Pressing should not make the fabric shine, flatten the pile or nap, or distort the texture or weave.

Pressing is not ironing. In ironing, the iron is pushed from one spot to another in an unbroken motion to remove wrinkles. In pressing, the iron is lifted up and set down in a particular spot to flatten or shape small areas. To prevent the fabric from stretching, do not ...


Heg77-73 Wall Finishes, Magdalene Pfister Jan 1977

Heg77-73 Wall Finishes, Magdalene Pfister

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses interior wall treatments: paint, wallpaper and fabric.

Paint is an easy, quick and inexpensive way to get the color you want. If you have a particular color in mind, you are most likely to find it in paint or have it mixed for the desired shade.

Wallpaper and other flexible coverings offer a wide variety of color, patterns and textures, It is possible to find a paper to go with any style of furnishings, formal or informal, in a wide price range. Some patterns are coordinated with fabric.

There are fabrics made especially for wall coverings which ...


G77-338 Open Burning (Revised March 1984), Donald E. Westover Jan 1977

G77-338 Open Burning (Revised March 1984), Donald E. Westover

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

People have been using fire in their cleanup chores for hundreds of years. One of the most common reasons for burning on the farm and in the city alike, has been to dispose of leaves and garden residues in the spring and fall of the year. Another common practice has been to burn tree limbs and stumps, fence posts, even old haystacks on the farm. Open burning has been done on a variety of scales, from jobs as small as burning the day's trash in the backyard burning barrel to jobs as large as burning wheat stubble after harvest.


G77-386 Wheat In Poultry Rations, T.W. Sullivan, E.W. Gleaves Jan 1977

G77-386 Wheat In Poultry Rations, T.W. Sullivan, E.W. Gleaves

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This publication examines the advantages and disadvantages of wheat as a component of poultry feed.

Wheat is usually considered a source of human food rather than an ingredient for poultry and livestock feeds. This is especially true in the United States, where corn, milo and other feed grains are abundantly produced. In recent years one of every two bushels of wheat produced in the United States has been exported. If world production and supplies of wheat are high, a surplus develops and wheat prices are lowered. When this situation occurs wheat becomes an attractive alternative to corn or milo in ...


G77-342 Sowbugs And Pillbugs, Arthur F. Hagen Jan 1977

G77-342 Sowbugs And Pillbugs, Arthur F. Hagen

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This publication covers the identification, life history, and control of sowbugs and pillbugs.

Homeowners working around shrubs, in the garden, or along the foundation of the house, frequently find little grayish colored bugs. They often describe them as looking like "little armadillos." What they are finding are sowbugs or pillbugs or both. These creatures are not insects, but belong to the same class of animals as crabs and shrimp.


G77-344 Annual Flowers For Specific Uses In Nebraska, Dale T. Lindgren Jan 1977

G77-344 Annual Flowers For Specific Uses In Nebraska, Dale T. Lindgren

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Wondering what annual flowers to plant where? This NebGuide can help.

Annual flowers grow from seed, come into flower and die in a single growing season. The following lists of annual flowers are grouped for specific uses in Nebraska. Common names are listed first, followed by scientific names.


G77-380 Growing Conifers From Seed, Constance A. Harrington Jan 1977

G77-380 Growing Conifers From Seed, Constance A. Harrington

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses how to grow conifers from seed, including technical terms, collecting and storing seed, and planting and care of the trees.

Growing your own conifer trees from seed is fun and gives you the satisfaction of doing it yourself. The pioneers had to be self-reliant. Many of the old trees in Nebraska were started from seeds the pioneers brought with them or ordered from nurseries in the east or Europe. We are fortunate in having nurseries available to supply a wide variety of planting stock. However, many people are still interested in growing their own seedlings. You may ...


G77-334 Timber Sale Contracts, Rick Hamilton Jan 1977

G77-334 Timber Sale Contracts, Rick Hamilton

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

A good contract protects both seller and buyer from legal problems arising from the harvest and sale of standing timber.

A timber sale contract is a legally binding written document governing the terms of a timber sale. A good contract protects both seller and buyer from legal problems arising from the harvest and sale of standing timber.

Timber has historically been sold under gentlemen's agreements. These verbal agreements have caused seller and buyer dissatisfaction and loss of trust. A contract clarifies the obligations of both parties prior to timber harvest.


G77-355 A Guide For The Control Of Flies In Nebraska Feedlots And Dairies (Revised March 1990), John B. Campbell Jan 1977

G77-355 A Guide For The Control Of Flies In Nebraska Feedlots And Dairies (Revised March 1990), John B. Campbell

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Flies, especially stable and house flies, can create serious and costly problems for feedlot and dairy operations. This publication describes several methods for control.

Several species of flies may be in confined livestock facilities during summer. The stable and house fly are the most serious pests. Blow flies also may be present if molasses is in the diet. Horn flies--small blood-feeding flies--may be present in early spring. These flies overwinter as pupae in or near manure pats in range or pasture. If cattle are not present in the grassland when horn flies emerge, they will migrate to confinement cattle. Normally ...


G77-357 Selecting Alfalfa Varieties For Nebraska (Revised December 1997), Bruce Anderson, Michael Trammell, Patrick E. Reece Jan 1977

G77-357 Selecting Alfalfa Varieties For Nebraska (Revised December 1997), Bruce Anderson, Michael Trammell, Patrick E. Reece

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Yield potential, pest resistance and seed price all should be considered in selecting alfalfa varieties in Nebraska. This NebGuide discusses them.

The most important variety decision made on many farms and ranches is the selection of alfalfa. The choice of alfalfa variety affects production for three to 10 or more years, whereas varieties of annual crops can be changed every year.

Many alfalfa varieties are available from private and public plant breeders. Over the years, yield trials conducted at widely distributed Nebraska locations have tested most varieties sold in the state.


G77-328 Irrigation Water Quality Criteria, Gary W. Hergert, Delno Knudsen Jan 1977

G77-328 Irrigation Water Quality Criteria, Gary W. Hergert, Delno Knudsen

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide is intended to provide guidelines to help understand and interpret chemical water quality test results.

All well and stream waters contain dissolved minerals. The amounts and kinds of minerals vary from one location to another and may vary with time. When irrigation water is applied, the mineral salts are left in the soil after the crop has used the water. Most of these mineral salts are beneficial to crop growth and soil condition, but in some cases they may be harmful. Irrigation water quality problems may be caused by (1) total mineral salts accumulating so that crops no ...


G77-384 Common Milkweed (Revised July 1984), Alex Martin, O.C. Burnside Jan 1977

G77-384 Common Milkweed (Revised July 1984), Alex Martin, O.C. Burnside

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses milkweed and how to control it in farmland.

Common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca L.) is a perennial, broadleaf weed native to North America. It is most common in eastern and central Nebraska, but is occasionally found farther west in moist sites.


G77-382 Right Crop Stage For Herbicide Use Corn, Sorghum, Small Grains (Revised May 1992), Drew J. Lyon, Robert G. Wilson Jr., Alex Martin Jan 1977

G77-382 Right Crop Stage For Herbicide Use Corn, Sorghum, Small Grains (Revised May 1992), Drew J. Lyon, Robert G. Wilson Jr., Alex Martin

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Herbicides recommended for postemergence application in corn, sorghum, and small grains are discussed in this NebGuide. Proper timing of postemergence herbicides is essential to achieve maximum weed control and minimum crop injury. As field crops grow and mature, their tolerance to herbicides changes. As a general rule, annual and biennial weeds are more susceptible to postemergence herbicides when they are in the seedling stage. As they mature they become increasingly difficult to control, facing the grower with the problem of when to apply the herbicide to achieve the least crop injury and the most satisfactory weed control. Field crops differ ...


G77-330 Estimating Pork Carcass Lean (Revised June 1994), Dennis E. Burson Jan 1977

G77-330 Estimating Pork Carcass Lean (Revised June 1994), Dennis E. Burson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Four procedures for pork carcass evaluation are given here, along with illustrations.

Pork carcass value is an important factor affecting the profitability of the pork industry. Reproduction traits and growth performance are easily recognized as keys to the profitability and health of the pork industry, yet carcass value also plays an important role. Differences in carcass product value are monetarily recognized by recognizing differences in carcass weight and grade. In addition, the pork industry recognizes that consumption of pork may key on public health concerns relating to reducing fat consumption and the resulting consumer demand for lower fat products.


G77-358 Artesian (Confinsed) Aquifers And Effect Of Pumping, Darryll T. Pederson, Deon D. Axthelm Jan 1977

G77-358 Artesian (Confinsed) Aquifers And Effect Of Pumping, Darryll T. Pederson, Deon D. Axthelm

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Nebraskans are concerned about declining water levels in some domestic and stock wells.

Nebraskans are concerned about declining water levels in some domestic and stock wells. Drought and irrigation well development have been major factors. Water level declines have been especially pronounced during the pumping season in places where the aquifer is artesian or confined (a confined aquifer is also referred to as an artesian aquifer). Many domestic and livestock pumps may have to be set deeper in order to yield water. In nearly all cases water levels recover rapidly when the pumping season ends. Large water-level fluctuations are normal ...


G77-383 Marketing Your Timber, Mark Shasby, Neal E. Jennings Jan 1977

G77-383 Marketing Your Timber, Mark Shasby, Neal E. Jennings

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Marketing is the key to getting the most from your timber.

Buying and selling trees is a business transaction. Marketing is the key to getting the most for your timber. Anyone can sell something if they are not concerned about the price received. When you market something, you are selling in a competitive market for the best possible price.

A satisfactory sale occurs when the needs of both buyer and seller are met. The buyer must acquire material at current market prices in order to stay in business and still remain competitive. The timber owner should be paid the fair ...


Heg77-78 It's About Time, Kathleen Prochaska-Cue Jan 1977

Heg77-78 It's About Time, Kathleen Prochaska-Cue

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide looks at a simple time management system.

An unusual resource each of us has is time. It's unusual because you can't save it for tomorrow, you can't borrow today some you had left over yesterday, you can't lend it to someone else, you can't leave it behind, you can't take it with you.

You can do only two things with time; use it now or lose it forever.