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A Meta-Analysis Of The Effects Of Problem- And Project-Based Learning On Academic Achievement In Grades 6-12 Populations, Kimberly J. Jensen Aug 2015

A Meta-Analysis Of The Effects Of Problem- And Project-Based Learning On Academic Achievement In Grades 6-12 Populations, Kimberly J. Jensen

Education Dissertations

Researchers and proponents of problem- and project-based learning (PBL) indicate that PBL as a curriculum and instruction approach (Savery, 2006; Schmidt, Loyens, Van Gog, & Paas, 2007) provides an effective way for teachers to respond to students’ needs, provides opportunities for students to actively engage in and take responsibility for learning by engaging in meaningful and relevant work, and provides students opportunities to directly apply their knowledge and skills (Hmelo-Silver & DeSimone, 2013; McCombs, 2010; Parker et al., 2011). Although primary research within secondary (6-12) contexts indicated that problem-and project based learning (PBL) is often superior to traditional, lecture-based instruction (Mergendoller, Maxwell, & Bellisimo, 2006; Wirkala & Kuhn, 2011) and meta-analyses at the post-secondary level indicated that PBL is at par with or superior to traditional, lecture-based instruction (Dochy, Segers, Van den Bossche, & Gijbels, 2003; Vernon & Blake, 1993; Walker & Leary, 2009), a synthesized and quantified exploration of the strength of relationship between PBL and academic achievement within middle high school student populations (Grades 6-12) was needed. The results in this meta-analysis indicate that overall, PBL students outperformed traditionally instructed students, g = 0.54, on content and skills exams across academic subject types and grade levels. Analysis of the funnel plot suggests publication bias; however, an adjustment of the mean effect using Duval and Tweedie’s (2000) Trim and Fill rendered a similar summary effect of g = 0.50. Although the mean summary effect is relatively robust, effect sizes varied depending on subject area and specific types of ...


The Effect Of Thinking Maps® On The Reading Achievement Of Middle School Students: An Ex Post Facto Causal Comparative Study, Karen Ogden Woodford May 2015

The Effect Of Thinking Maps® On The Reading Achievement Of Middle School Students: An Ex Post Facto Causal Comparative Study, Karen Ogden Woodford

Doctoral Dissertations and Projects

The purpose of this study was to determine what, if any, relationship existed between Thinking Maps® instruction used as a school-wide strategy and student achievement in middle school students in the area of reading as reported by the Virginia State Standards of Learning Test scores. The association was tested through full implementation and instruction of Thinking Maps® as a school-wide strategy. Using a quantitative design, this ex post facto, causal comparative included a comparison of sixth, seventh, and eighth grade students' Virginia Reading SOL scores from 2011, 2012, and 2013 after schools implemented Thinking Maps® as a school-wide strategy compared ...