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Agriculture

1992

Articles 1 - 11 of 11

Full-Text Articles in Education

G92-1081 Factors That Affect Soil-Applied Herbicides, R. S. Moomaw, Robert N. Klein, Alex Martin, Fred Roeth, P.J. Shea, G.A. Wicks, R. G. Wilson Jan 1992

G92-1081 Factors That Affect Soil-Applied Herbicides, R. S. Moomaw, Robert N. Klein, Alex Martin, Fred Roeth, P.J. Shea, G.A. Wicks, R. G. Wilson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Characteristics of soil-applied herbicides are discussed, including site of uptake by weeds, solubility, adsorption, persistence, leaching potential, photodecomposition, and volatility. For best performance, preemergence and preplant herbicides must be placed in the top 0 to 3 inches of soil. Placement is important because the herbicide must enter the germinating weed seedling in order to kill it. Herbicides can be blended into the soil by mechanical incorporation, rainfall, or sprinkler irrigation, depending on the herbicide. Herbicide characteristics that determine their performance are site of uptake by weeds, solubility, adsorption, persistence, leaching potential, photodecomposition, and volatility. An understanding of these factors will ...


G92-1100 Sugar Beet Nematode, Eric D. Kerr, F.A. Gray, G.D. Franc Jan 1992

G92-1100 Sugar Beet Nematode, Eric D. Kerr, F.A. Gray, G.D. Franc

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Symptoms, life cycle and control of sugar beet nematodes are among the topics covered here.

The sugar beet nematode, schachtii, is a major parasite of sugar beets, causing serious stand and yield reductions. It was first identified in 1859 on sugar beets near Halle, Germany. It was first observed in the United States as early as 1895 and was reported in two fields near Gering, Nebraska in 1926.


G92-1103 White Mold Of Dry Beans, James R. Steadman, Howard F. Schwartz, Eric D. Kerr Jan 1992

G92-1103 White Mold Of Dry Beans, James R. Steadman, Howard F. Schwartz, Eric D. Kerr

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

White mold symptoms, infection and control are covered here.

One of the most important diseases affecting dry beans in western Nebraska and Colorado is white mold caused by the fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. In a recent year, losses from this disease averaged as high as 20 percent, with a few individual field losses exceeding 65 percent.


G92-1119 Rust Diseases Of Turfgrass, John E. Watkins, Roch E. Gaussoin Jan 1992

G92-1119 Rust Diseases Of Turfgrass, John E. Watkins, Roch E. Gaussoin

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide describes the various rust diseases common to Nebraska and offers suggestions for maintaining a vigorous and disease-resistant lawn.

Rust diseases occur on all turfgrasses; however, most rust problems occur on Kentucky bluegrass, perennial ryegrass, tall fescue and zoysia. In the cool-temperate regions of North America, cool season turfgrasses may suffer severe injury late in summer by attack from one of the rust pathogens. In addition, rust-weakened plants are much more susceptible to injury from environmental stresses and to attack by other turfgrass pathogens.


G92-1096 Understand Your Soil Test: Ph-Excess Lime-Lime Needs, K.D. Frank, Delno Knudsen Jan 1992

G92-1096 Understand Your Soil Test: Ph-Excess Lime-Lime Needs, K.D. Frank, Delno Knudsen

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The relationships among pH, soil type, and lime requirements are explained.

Accurate soil tests can be an excellent management tool. Misuse of soil tests leads to increased production costs, yield losses, or both. The elements required by plants for proper growth have been determined by experimentation. Experience has shown that soils across Nebraska differ greatly in their capacity to supply these elements. The amount of each element supplied by a soil depends on several factors. Two important ones are: (1) the type of material from which the soil was formed, and (2) the treatment the soil has received since being ...


Ec92-125 On-Farm Trials For Farmers Using The Randomized Complete Block Design, Phil Rzewnicki Jan 1992

Ec92-125 On-Farm Trials For Farmers Using The Randomized Complete Block Design, Phil Rzewnicki

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Farmers are interested in evaluating new agricultural practices on their own farms. To produce results credible to themselves, other farmers, and researchers, a systematic method of testing should be used. If a comparison of agricultural practices results in one practice yielding a few more bushels of crop than another, this does not necessarily mean it is a more valuable practice. The difference may simply be due to field variation or chance.

This circular discusses the on-farm trials and incorporation of the two basic requirements in designing experiments: randomization and replication.


Ec92-1245 Buffalograss: A Warm-Season Native Grass For Turf, S.A. Deshazer, Terrance P. Riordan, Frederick P. Baxendale, Roch E. Gaussoin Jan 1992

Ec92-1245 Buffalograss: A Warm-Season Native Grass For Turf, S.A. Deshazer, Terrance P. Riordan, Frederick P. Baxendale, Roch E. Gaussoin

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Buffalograss is a native grass species which has prospered on the Great Plains for centuries. Both cyclic and prolonged droughts have challenged it to evolve water use efficiency and sod forming ability. People are considering this short, fine-leaved prairie grass for an ecologically sound and energy efficient turf.


G92-1121 Winter Deicing Agents For The Homeowner, Jay Fitzgerald, Donald E. Janssen Jan 1992

G92-1121 Winter Deicing Agents For The Homeowner, Jay Fitzgerald, Donald E. Janssen

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Information on deicers and how they affect plants is covered here.

Slick sidewalks and roads are hazardous. Removing compacted snow and ice with shovels or snow blowers is not always an easy task. Deicers can help by "undercutting," or loosening the snow or ice because they lower the freezing point of water.

Do not use deicers to completely melt snow or ice, but to make their removal easier. Deicers melt down through the ice or snow to the hard surface, then spread out underneath. This undercuts and loosens the snow so shoveling and plowing can be done.


G92-1112 Lice Control On Cattle, John B. Campbell Jan 1992

G92-1112 Lice Control On Cattle, John B. Campbell

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Identifying and controlling lice on cattle both are covered here.

Cattle lice may be the most underestimated livestock insect in terms of economic losses. The USDA estimates that U.S. livestock producers lose $125 million a year to cattle lice.

Heavy louse populations cause lowered milk production, loss of flesh, stunted growth, general unthriftiness and anemia. "Chronic" or "carrier" cows may abort due to louse-induced anemia. During severe winters, louse-infested animals are more susceptible to respiratory diseases.


G92-1094 Controlling External Swine Parasites, John B. Campbell, Barbara Straw Jan 1992

G92-1094 Controlling External Swine Parasites, John B. Campbell, Barbara Straw

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Mixing, safety, restrictions, and precautions for insecticides used to control external swine parasites.

Hog Lice and Mange Mites

External parasites of swine include the hog louse and two species of mange mites (the common itch mite and the less common hog follicle mite). Excessive scratching and rubbing by pigs nearly always indicate an infestation of hog lice or mange mites.

Hog lice and mange mites infest a high percentage of swine slaughtered at Midwest slaughter plants.


Mp92-64 The Stable Fly: A Pest Of Humans And Domestic Animals, Gustave D. Thomas, Steven R. Skoda Jan 1992

Mp92-64 The Stable Fly: A Pest Of Humans And Domestic Animals, Gustave D. Thomas, Steven R. Skoda

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Many species of flies are pests. Many people, if you were to ask them about flies, would be at least vaguely aware of the potential to flies to transmit disease organisms. But yet, for the most part, a fly is a fly is a fly. Sayings like "It must be about to rain, the house flies are biting" are still common and show a general need for more, readily accessible information, particularly about some of the pest flies.

Stable flies, obligate blood-feeders, are very important pests to the cattle industry and, at times, are pests to other groups (they're ...